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  1. Joshua D. Margolis (forthcoming). Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Joshua D. Margolis & Adam M. Grant (2007). And Andrew L. Molinsky. In Ashly Pinnington, Rob Macklin & Tom Campbell (eds.), Human Resource Management: Ethics and Employment. Oup Oxford. 237.
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  3. Joshua D. Margolis (2004). Responsibility, Inconsistency, and the Paradoxes of Morality in Human Nature De Waal's Window Into Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:43-52.
    Efforts to trace the evolutionary antecedents of human morality introduce challenges and opportunities for business ethics. The biological precedents of responsibility suggest that human tendencies to respond morally are deeply rooted. This does not mean, however, that those tendencies are always consistent with ends human beings seek to pursue. This paper investigates the conflicts that may arise between human beings’ moral predispositions and the purposes human beings pursue.
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  4. Joshua D. Margolis (2001). Responsibility in Organizational Context. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):431-454.
    Why does it matter that every negative thought you have had about car salespeople, they have likely had about you? The answerto this question opens up the distinctive challenges, and opportunities, facing business ethics. Those challenges and opportunitiesemerge from the significant bearing organizational reality has upon individuals’ conduct. As we consider how to assign responsibilityfor misconduct; how to provide guidance to organizational actors about what they ought to do; and how to develop responsive ethicaltheory, we need to take psychological and (...)
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  5. Joshua D. Margolis (1999). Toward an Ethics of Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):619-638.
    The organization is importantly different from both the nation-state and the individual and hence needs its own ethical models and theories, distinct from political and moral theory. To develop a case for organizational ethics, this paper advances arguments in three directions. First, it highlights the growing role of organizations and their distinctive attributes. Second, it illuminates the incongruities between organizations and moral and political philosophy. Third, it takes these incongruities, as well as organizations’ distinctive attributes, as a starting point for (...)
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  6. Joshua D. Margolis (1998). Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people inbusiness organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in turn, (...)
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