Search results for 'Josiah Tucker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Josiah Tucker (1781). A Treatise Concerning Civil Government. New York, A. M. Kelley.
    ... Foundation of Civil Government, according to Mr. Locke and his ...
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  2. George Tucker (2004). The Life and Philosophy of George Tucker. Thoemmes Continuum.
    v. 1. Tucker's life and writings -- v. 2. Essays on various subjects of taste, morals, and national policy -- v. 3. A voyage to the moon -- v. 4. Essays, moral and metaphysical.
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  3.  22
    Adam Tucker (2012). Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Ingenuity of the Human Rights Act: A Review of Aileen Kavanagh's Constitutional Review Under the UK Human Rights Act by Adam Tucker. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 3 (1):307-318.
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  4.  4
    T. G. Tucker (1903). Tucker's Choephori of Aeschylus Tucker's Choephori of Aeschylus. The Classical Review 17 (02):125-128.
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  5.  3
    B. W. Young (1996). Christianity, Commerce and the Canon: Josiah Tucker and Richard Woodward on Political Economy. History of European Ideas 22 (5-6):385-400.
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  6. Peter Stallybrass (1985). Josiah Tucker, Dean of Gloucester, 1745. Matthew Arnold's Famous Opposition Between Culture and Anarchy Can, Perhaps, Be Seen as One Way of Constructing an Opposition Between Rhetoric and Violence. Rhetoric, at Least The'legitimate'rhetoric of the Classic Text, Becomes a Machine to Overcome Time, a Transhistorical Reason. [REVIEW] Semiotica 54:113.
     
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  7.  37
    Aviezer Tucker (2004). Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography. Cambridge University Press.
    How do historians, comparative linguists, biblical and textual critics and evolutionary biologists establish beliefs about the past? How do they know the past? This book presents a philosophical analysis of the disciplines that offer scientific knowledge of the past. Using the analytic tools of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science the book covers such topics as evidence, theory, methodology, explanation, determination and underdetermination, coincidence, contingency and counterfactuals in historiography. Aviezer Tucker's central claim is that historiography as a scientific discipline (...)
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  8.  19
    Bram Tucker & Lisa Rende Taylor (2007). The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues. Human Nature 18 (3):181-189.
    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as a tool to help the people (...)
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  9. Aviezer Tucker (2004). Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography. Cambridge University Press.
    How do historians, comparative linguists, biblical and textual critics and evolutionary biologists establish beliefs about the past? How do they know the past? This book presents a philosophical analysis of the disciplines that offer scientific knowledge of the past. Using the analytic tools of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science the book covers such topics as evidence, theory, methodology, explanation, determination and underdetermination, coincidence, contingency and counterfactuals in historiography. Aviezer Tucker's central claim is that historiography as a scientific discipline (...)
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  10. Aviezer Tucker (2009). Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography. Cambridge University Press.
    How do historians, comparative linguists, biblical and textual critics and evolutionary biologists establish beliefs about the past? How do they know the past? This book presents a philosophical analysis of the disciplines that offer scientific knowledge of the past. Using the analytic tools of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science the book covers such topics as evidence, theory, methodology, explanation, determination and underdetermination, coincidence, contingency and counterfactuals in historiography. Aviezer Tucker's central claim is that historiography as a scientific discipline (...)
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  11. Mary Evelyn Tucker (2014). The Emerging Alliance of Religion and Ecology. University of Utah Press.
    The environmental crisis is most frequently viewed through the lens of science, policy, law, and economics. In recent years the moral and spiritual dimensions of this crisis are becoming more visible. Indeed, the world religions are bringing their texts and traditions, along with their ethics and practices, into dialogue with environmental problems. In a lecture delivered at the University of Utah, Tucker explores this growing movement and highlights why it holds great promise for long term changes for the flourishing (...)
     
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  12. N. Tucker (2009). Understanding the Mass Media. Cambridge University Press.
    The average British fourteen-year-old watches a great deal of TV. He helps to spend a quarter of a million pounds on pop records every Saturday. Like the rest of us he is beset by advertisements. As an adult he is virtually certain to read mass-circulation daily and Sunday newspapers. This is his mental world. The modern teacher wants to bring this world to the classroom but if he merely tries the Old Testament prophet stance and says its all corrupt, he (...)
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  13.  75
    Moritz Baumstark (2012). The End of Empire and the Death of Religion : A Reconsideration of Hume's Later Political Thought. In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press
    This essay reconsiders David Hume’s thinking on the fate of the British Empire and the future of established religion. It provides a detailed reconstruction of the development of Hume’s views on Britain’s successive attempts to impose or regain its authority over its North American colonies and compares these views with the stance taken during the American Crisis by Adam Smith and Josiah Tucker. Fresh light is shed on this area of Hume’s later political thought by a new letter, (...)
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  14. Chris Tucker (2010). When Transmission Fails. Philosophical Review 119 (4):497-529.
    The Neo-Moorean Deduction (I have a hand, so I am not a brain-in-a-vat) and the Zebra Deduction (the creature is a zebra, so isn’t a cleverly disguised mule) are notorious. Crispin Wright, Martin Davies, Fred Dretske, and Brian McLaughlin, among others, argue that these deductions are instances of transmission failure. That is, they argue that these deductions cannot transmit justification to their conclusions. I contend, however, that the notoriety of these deductions is undeserved. My strategy is to clarify, attack, defend, (...)
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  15. Chris Tucker (2010). Why Open-Minded People Should Endorse Dogmatism. Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):529-545.
    Open-minded people should endorse dogmatism because of its explanatory power. Dogmatism holds that, in the absence of defeaters, a seeming that P necessarily provides non-inferential justification for P. I show that dogmatism provides an intuitive explanation of four issues concerning non-inferential justification. It is particularly impressive that dogmatism can explain these issues because prominent epistemologists have argued that it can’t address at least two of them. Prominent epistemologists also object that dogmatism is absurdly permissive because it allows a seeming to (...)
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  16. Chris Tucker (2014). If Dogmatists Have a Problem with Cognitive Penetration, You Do Too. Dialectica 68 (1):35-62.
    Perceptual dogmatism holds that if it perceptually seems to S that P, then S thereby has prima facie perceptual justification for P. But suppose Wishful Willy's desire for gold cognitively penetrates his perceptual experience and makes it seem to him that the yellow object is a gold nugget. Intuitively, his desire-penetrated seeming can't provide him with prima facie justification for thinking that the object is gold. If this intuitive response is correct, dogmatists have a problem. But if dogmatists have a (...)
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  17.  46
    Chris Tucker (ed.) (2013). Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. OUP USA.
    The primary aim of this book is to understand how seemings relate to justification and whether some version of dogmatism or phenomenal conservatism can be sustained. It also addresses a number of other issues, including the nature of seemings, cognitive penetration, Bayesianism, and the epistemology of morality and disagreement.
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  18. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority of (...)
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  19. Ericka Tucker (2011). Baruch Spinoza. In Deen Chatterjee (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer
  20. Ericka Tucker (2013). Community Radio in Political Theory and Development Practice. Journal of Development and Communication Studies 2 (2-3):392 - 420.
    While to political theorists in the United States ‘community radio’ may seem a quaint holdover of the democratization movements of the 1960s, community radio has been an important tool in development contexts for decades. In this paper I investigate how community radio is conceptualized within and outside of the development frame, as a solution to development problems, as part of development projects communication strategy, and as a tool for increasing democratic political participation in development projects. I want to show that (...)
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  21. Chris Tucker (2014). On What Inferentially Justifies What: The Vices of Reliabilism and Proper Functionalism. Synthese 191 (14):3311-3328.
    We commonly say that some evidence supports a hypothesis or that some premise evidentially supports a conclusion. Both internalists and externalists attempt to analyze this notion of evidential support, and the primary purpose of this paper is to argue that reliabilist and proper functionalist accounts of this relation fail. Since evidential support is one component of inferential justification, the upshot of this failure is that their accounts of inferential justification also fail. In Sect. 2, I clarify the evidential support relation. (...)
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  22. Karen B. Westerfield Tucker (2006). Polemic Against Stillness in the Hymns on the Lord's Supper. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 88 (2):101-119.
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  23. Chris Tucker (2011). Phenomenal Conservatism and Evidentialism in Religious Epistemology. In Kelly James Clark & Raymond J. VanArragon (eds.), Evidence and Religious Belief. Oxford University Press 52--73.
    Phenomenal conservatism holds, roughly, that if it seems to S that P, then S has evidence for P. I argue for two main conclusions. The first is that phenomenal conservatism is better suited than is proper functionalism to explain how a particular type of religious belief formation can lead to non-inferentially justified religious beliefs. The second is that phenomenal conservatism makes evidence so easy to obtain that the truth of evidentialism would not be a significant obstacle to justified religious belief. (...)
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  24. Chris Tucker (2012). Movin' on Up: Higher-Level Requirements and Inferential Justification. Philosophical Studies 157 (3):323-340.
    Does inferential justification require the subject to be aware that her premises support her conclusion? Externalists tend to answer “no” and internalists tend to answer “yes”. In fact, internalists often hold the strong higher-level requirement that an argument justifies its conclusion only if the subject justifiably believes that her premises support her conclusion. I argue for a middle ground. Against most externalists, I argue that inferential justification requires that one be aware that her premises support her conclusion. Against many internalists, (...)
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  25. Ericka Tucker (2014). Feminist Political Theory. In Gibbons Michael (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. New York: Wiley Blackwell. Blackwell
  26. Joan Tronto, Nel Noddings, Eloise Buker, Selma Sevenhuijsen, Vivienne Bozalek, Amanda Gouws, Marie Minnaar-Mcdonald, Deborah Little, Margaret Urban Walker, Fiona Robinson, Judith Stadtman Tucker & Cheryl Brandsen (2006). Socializing Care: Feminist Ethics and Public Issues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Contributors to this volume demonstrate how the ethics of care factors into a variety of social policies and institutions, and can indeed be useful in thinking about a number of different social problems. Divided into two sections, the first looks at care as a model for an evaluative framework that rethinks social institutions, liberal society, and citizenship at a basic conceptual level. The second explores care values in the context of specific social practices or settings, as a framework that should (...)
     
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  27. Chris Tucker (2016). Acquaintance and Fallible Non-Inferential Justification. In Michael Bergmann & Brett Coppenger (eds.), Intellectual Assurance: Essays on Traditional Epistemic Internalism. Oxford University Press 43-60.
    Classical acquaintance theory is any version of classical foundationalism that appeals to acquaintance in order to account for non-inferential justification. Such theories are well suited to account for a kind of infallible non-inferential justification. Why am I justified in believing that I’m in pain? An initially attractive (partial) answer is that I’m acquainted with my pain. But since I can’t be acquainted with what isn’t there, acquaintance with my pain guarantees that I’m in pain. What’s less clear is whether, given (...)
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  28. P. Grossenbacher, P. Compton, Mi Posner & D. Tucker (1991). Combining Isolable Physical and Semantic Codes. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):518-518.
     
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  29. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, I argue that (...)
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  30. W. Dennis Tucker (forthcoming). Book Review: Psalms. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (3):315-315.
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  31. Ericka Tucker (2012). Illuminating the Radical Democratic Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Studies in Social and Political Thought 20:138-141.
  32. Ericka Tucker (2013). Affective Disorders of the State. Journal of East-West Thought 3 (2):97-120.
    The problems of contemporary states are in large part “affective disorders”; they are failures of states to properly understand and coordinate the emotions of the individuals within and in some instances outside the state. By excluding, imprisoning, and marginalizing members of their societies, states create internal enemies who ultimately enervate their own power and the possibility of peace and freedom within the state. Spinoza’s political theory, based on the notion that the best forms of state are those that coordinate the (...)
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  33.  13
    Mark H. Johnson & Leslie A. Tucker, The Emergence of the Social Brain Network: Evidence From Typical and Atypical Development.
    Several research groups have identified a network of regions of the adult cortex that are activated during social perception and cognition tasks. In this paper we focus on the development of components of this social brain network during early childhood and test aspects of a particular viewpoint on human functional brain development: “interactive specialization.” Specifically, we apply new data analysis techniques to a previously published data set of event-related potential ~ERP! studies involving 3-, 4-, and 12-month-old infants viewing faces of (...)
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  34. Jeffrey A. Tucker & Llewellyn H. Rockwell (1991). The Cultural Thought of Ludwig von Mises. Journal of Libertarian Studies 10 (1):23-52.
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  35. W. Dennis Tucker (forthcoming). Psalm 31:1–5, 15–16. Interpretation 65 (1):70-71.
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  36. Chris Tucker (2009). Perceptual Justification and Warrant by Default. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87: 445-63 87 (3):445-63.
    As I use the term, ‘entitlement’ is any warrant one has by default—i.e. without acquiring it. Some philosophers not only affirm the existence of entitlement, but also give it a crucial role in the justification of our perceptual beliefs. These philosophers affirm the Entitlement Thesis: An essential part of what makes our perceptual beliefs justified is our entitlement to the proposition that I am not a brain-in-a-vat. Crispin Wright, Stewart Cohen, and Roger White are among those who endorse this controversial (...)
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  37.  81
    Chris Tucker (2008). Divine Hiddenness and the Value of Divine–Creature Relationships. Religious Studies 44 (3):269-287.
    Apparently, relationships between God (if He exists) and His creatures would be very valuable. Appreciating this value raises the question of whether it can motivate a certain premise in John Schellenberg’s argument from divine hiddenness, a premise which claims, roughly, that if some capable, non-resistant subject fails to believe in God, then God does not exist. In this paper, I argue that the value of divine–creature relationships can justify this premise only if we have reason to believe that the counterfactuals (...)
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  38.  10
    Pamela Yeow, Alison Dean & Danielle Tucker (2013). Bags for Life: The Embedding of Ethical Consumerism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-13.
    The aim of this paper is to understand why some ethical behaviours fail to embed, and importantly what can be done about it. We address this by looking at an example where ethical behaviour has not become the norm, i.e. the widespread, habitual, use of ‘bags for life’. This is an interesting case because whilst a consistent message of ‘saving the environment’ has been the basis of the promotion of ‘bags for life’ in the United Kingdom for many years, their (...)
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  39.  88
    Gene M. Tucker (forthcoming). Book Review: The Book of Amos: A Commentary. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (3):304-305.
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  40.  22
    Bonnie Poitras Tucker (1998). Deaf Culture, Cochlear Implants, and Elective Disability. Hastings Center Report 28 (4):6-14.
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  41.  8
    Mary Evelyn Tucker (2014). The Earth Charter and Journey of the Universe: An Integrated Framework for Biodemocracy. Zygon 49 (4):910-916.
    The principles of the Earth Charter and the cosmological story of Journey of the Universe provide a unique synergy for rethinking a sustainable future. The Great Story inspires the Great Work of the transformation of the political, social, and economic orders. Such a synergy can contribute to the broadened understanding of sustainability as including economic, ecological, social, and spiritual well-being. This integrated understanding may be a basis for creating biodemocracies, which will involve long-term policies, programs, and practices for a planetary (...)
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  42. John Allen Tucker (2004). From Nativism to Numerology: Yamaga Soko's Final Excursion Into the Metaphysics of Change. Philosophy East and West 54 (2):194-217.
    : Most discussions of Yamaga Soko's philosophical development as a Confucian scholar in Tokugawa Japan suggest that in his later years he moved away from Confucianism and toward a religio-philosophical celebration of Japan's supposed uniqueness. It is shown here, however, that Soko's nativism, set forth in his Chucho jijitsu, was later eclipsed by his final philosophical work, the Gengen hakki, wherein he articulated a kind of naturalistic numerology, based vaguely on the Yijing. This shift in Soko's thought can be viewed (...)
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  43.  19
    Sean Tucker, Nick Turner, Julian Barling, Erin M. Reid & Cecilia Elving (2006). Apologies and Transformational Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):195 - 207.
    This empirical investigation showed that contrary to the popular notion that apologies signify weakness, the victims of mistakes made by leaders consistently perceived leaders who apologized as more transformational than those who did not apologize. In a field experiment (Study 1), male referees who were perceived as having apologized for mistakes made officiating hockey games were rated by male coaches (n = 93) as more transformational than when no apology was made. Studies 2 (n = 50) and 3 (n = (...)
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  44.  21
    Lewis R. Tucker, Vlasis Stathakopolous & Charles H. Patti (1999). A Multidimensional Assessment of Ethical Codes: The Professional Business Association Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 19 (3):287 - 300.
    This article develops a multidimensional approach for the investigation of the ethical codes of professional associations. The authors: (a) examine various ethical frameworks to identify ethical constructs, (b) select ethical constructs to apply to the assessment of professional codes of ethics, (c) content analyze conceptual and descriptive similarities and differences across a large sample of professional codes of ethics, (d) address organizational variables that affect the development of ethical codes, and (e) investigate through survey research the beliefs and attitudes of (...)
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  45.  92
    Dustin Tucker & Richmond H. Thomason (2011). Paradoxes of Intensionality. Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (3):394-411.
    We identify a class of paradoxes that is neither set-theoretical nor semantical, but that seems to depend on intensionality. In particular, these paradoxes arise out of plausible properties of propositional attitudes and their objects. We try to explain why logicians have neglected these paradoxes, and to show that, like the Russell Paradox and the direct discourse Liar Paradox, these intensional paradoxes are recalcitrant and challenge logical analysis. Indeed, when we take these paradoxes seriously, we may need to rethink the commonly (...)
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  46. William Kneale, John Tucker, A. C. Ewing, David Braine, R. M. Hare, Rush Rhees, Herbert Heidelberger, Mary Warnock & John J. Jenkins (1968). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 77 (307):441-459.
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  47.  43
    Aviezer Tucker (2003). The Epistemic Significance of Consensus. Inquiry 46 (4):501 – 521.
    Philosophers have often noted that science displays an uncommon degree of consensus on beliefs among its practitioners. Yet consensus in the sciences is not a goal in itself. I consider cases of consensus on beliefs as concrete events. Consensus on beliefs is neither a sufficient nor a necessary condition for presuming that these beliefs constitute knowledge. A concrete consensus on a set of beliefs by a group of people at a given historical period may be explained by different factors according (...)
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  48.  32
    Chris Tucker (2010). Transmission and Transmission Failure in Epistemology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  49.  97
    Chris Tucker (2013). Seemings and Justification: An Introduction. In Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. Oxford University Press 1-29.
    It is natural to think that many of our beliefs are rational because they are based on seemings, or on the way things seem. This is especially clear in the case of perception. Many of our mathematical, moral, and memory beliefs also appear to be based on seemings. In each of these cases, it is natural to think that our beliefs are not only based on a seeming, but also that they are rationally based on these seemings—at least assuming there (...)
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  50. John Tucker (1969). A Comment on I. J. Good's Note on Richard's Paradox. Mind 78 (310):272.
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