5 found
Sort by:
  1. Joyce F. Benenson, Robert Tennyson & Richard W. Wrangham (2011). Male More Than Female Infants Imitate Propulsive Motion. Cognition 121 (2):262-267.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Henry Markovits & Joyce F. Benenson (2010). Males Outperform Females in Translating Social Relations Into Spatial Positions. Cognition 117 (3):332-340.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Joyce F. Benenson (2009). Dominating Versus Eliminating the Competition: Sex Differences in Human Intrasexual Aggression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):268-269.
    Archer presents a traditional view of intrasexual competition. Knowledge of a species' social structure provides a more complete picture. Human males compete against individuals with whom they may cooperate later in inter-group aggression. By contrast, females compete against individuals for a mate's continued support. Females' aggression may aim at eliminating the competition, whereas males simply may attempt to dominate others.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joyce F. Benenson (1999). Females' Desire for Status Cannot Be Measured Using Male Definitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):216-217.
    The development of physical traits and the formation of alliances are two important means of attaining status for both sexes. The types of physical traits and alliances that are linked with status, however, differ for the two sexes. Sex differences in the characteristics that lead to the acquisition of status must be considered before concluding that females are less concerned than males with status.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joyce F. Benenson, Tamara Morganstein & Rosanne Roy (1998). Sex Differences in Children's Investment in Peers. Human Nature 9 (4):369-390.
    It is hypothesized from within an evolutionary framework that females should be less invested in peer relations than males. Investment was operationalized as enjoyment in Study 1 and as preference for interaction in Study 2. In the first study, four- and six-year-old children’s enjoyment of peer interaction was observed in 26 groups of same-sex peers. Girls were rated as enjoying their interactions significantly less than boys. In the second study, six- and nine-year-old children were interviewed about the individuals with whom (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation