Search results for 'Juaeo-Arabic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tzvi Langermann (2003). Saving the Soul by Knowing the Soul: A Medieval Yemeni Interpretation of Song of Songs. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (2):147-166.score: 30.0
    Discussion of salvation by self-knowledge in Yemeni-Jewish philosophy, and possible sources in Avicennan, Ishraqi, and Indian texts.
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  2. Riccardo Strobino (2012). Avicenna’s Use of the Arabic Translations of the Posterior Analytics and the Ancient Commentary Tradition. Oriens 40 (2):355–389.score: 18.0
    In this paper I shall discuss the relationship between the two known Arabic translations of Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics and Avicenna’s Kitāb al-Burhān. I shall argue that Avicenna relies on both (1) Abū Bishr Mattā’s translation and (2) the anonymous translation used by Averroes in the Long Commentary as well as in the Middle Commentary (and also indirectly preserved by Gerard of Cremona’s Latin translation of Aristotle’s work). Although, generally speaking, the problem is relevant to the history of the transmission of (...)
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  3. Georges Bohas (1990). The Arabic Linguistic Tradition. Routledge.score: 18.0
    GENERAL INTRODUCTION THE GROWTH OF THE ARABIC LINGUISTIC TRADITION: A HISTORICAL SURVEY Early grammatical thinking to the end of the second/eighth century ...
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  4. Dag Nikolaus Hasse (2008). The Early Albertus Magnus and His Arabic Sources on the Theory of the Soul. Vivarium 46 (3):232-252.score: 18.0
    Albertus Magnus favours the Aristotelian definition of the soul as the first actuality or perfection of a natural body having life potentially. But he interprets Aristotle's vocabulary in a way that it becomes compatible with the separability of the soul from the body. The term “perfectio” is understood as referring to the soul's activity only, not to its essence. The term “forma” is avoided as inadequate for defining the soul's essence. The soul is understood as a substance which exists independently (...)
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  5. Uwe Vagelpohl (2010). The Prior Analytics in the Syriac and Arabic Tradition. Vivarium 48 (1-2):134-158.score: 18.0
    The reception history of Aristotle's Prior Analytics in the Islamic world began even before its ninth-century translation into Arabic. Three generations earlier, Arabic authors already absorbed echoes of the varied and extensive logical teaching tradition of Greek- and Syriac-speaking religious communities in the new Islamic state. Once translated into Arabic, the Prior Analytics inspired a rich tradition of logical studies, culminating in the creation of an independent Islamic logical tradition by Ibn Sina (d. 1037), Ibn Rušd (d. 1098) and others. (...)
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  6. Jeffrey A. Oaks (2007). Medieval Arabic Algebra as an Artificial Language. Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (5-6):543-575.score: 18.0
    Medieval Arabic algebra is a good example of an artificial language.Yet despite its abstract, formal structure, its utility was restricted to problem solving. Geometry was the branch of mathematics used for expressing theories. While algebra was an art concerned with finding specific unknown numbers, geometry dealtwith generalmagnitudes.Algebra did possess the generosity needed to raise it to a more theoretical level—in the ninth century Abū Kāmil reinterpreted the algebraic unknown “thing” to prove a general result. But mathematicians had no motive to (...)
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  7. Gregg De Young (2012). Mathematical Diagrams From Manuscript to Print: Examples From the Arabic Euclidean Transmission. Synthese 186 (1):21-54.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I explore general features of the “architecture” (relations of white space, diagram, and text on the page) of medieval manuscripts and early printed editions of Euclidean geometry. My focus is primarily on diagrams in the Arabic transmission, although I use some examples from both Byzantine Greek and medieval Latin manuscripts as a foil to throw light on distinctive features of the Arabic transmission. My investigations suggest that the “architecture” often takes shape against the backdrop of an educational (...)
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  8. Haitham Taha & Asaid Khateb (2013). Resolving the Orthographic Ambiguity During Visual Word Recognition in Arabic: An Event-Related Potential Investigation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:821.score: 18.0
    The Arabic alphabetical orthographic system has various unique features that include the existence of emphatic phonemic letters. These represent several pairs of letters that share a phonological similarity and use the same parts of the articulation system. The phonological and articulatory similarities between these letters lead to spelling errors where the subject tends to produce a pseudohomophone (PHw) instead of the correct word. Here, we investigated whether or not the unique orthographic features of the written Arabic words modulate early orthographic (...)
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  9. Ahmad Y. Al-hassan (2009). An Eighth Century Arabic Treatise on the Colouring of Glass: Kitāb Al-Durra Al-Maknūna (the Book of the Hidden Pearl) of Jābir Ibn Ayyān (C. 721–C. 815). [REVIEW] Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 19 (1):121-156.score: 15.0
    This paper examines the history of glass colouring. It reviews Kitna of Jayybir as a philosopher and chemist. The art of lustre-painting on glass originated in Syria during the Umayyad Caliphate in the eighth century and was soon practised in the neighbouring area. The paper reviews Arabic literature that deals with the colouring of glass until the 13th century, and with pre-Islamic and Latin books of recipes that deal with glass colouring. Recipes for cast coloured glass are very few and (...)
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  10. Gerhard Endress, Rüdiger Arnzen & J. Thielmann (eds.) (2004). Words, Texts, and Concepts Cruising the Mediterranean Sea: Studies on the Sources, Contents and Influences of Islamic Civilization and Arabic Philosophy and Science: Dedicated to Gerhard Endress on His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Peeters.score: 15.0
    This statement by the late Franz Rosenthal is, in a sense, the uniting theme of the present volume's 35 articles by renowned scholars of Islamic Studies, Middle ...
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  11. Ali Moussa (2010). The Trigonometric Functions, as They Were in the Arabic-Islamic Civilization. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 20 (1):93-104.score: 15.0
    In the Greek/Indian period, it is noticeable that different radii were used in connection with the chord. This manner continued in the Indian period with the sine, i.e. different sine tables existed. But throughout the Arabic-Islamic period, there was stability in the radius (for the sine). At the time of al-Batt new terms were introduced, not as functions of angles but as lengths, and again different tables for the same term. Here these terms were not bounded to the circle, and (...)
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  12. Peter E. Pormann (2008). Case Notes and Clinicians: Galen's Commentary on the Hippocratic Epidemics in the Arabic Tradition. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 18 (2):247-284.score: 15.0
    Galenunayn ibn Isq (d. c. 873) is of crucial importance because it preserves large sections now lost in Greek, and because it helped to establish an Arabic clinical literature. The present contribution investigate the translation of this seminal work into Syriac and Arabic. It provides a first survey of the manuscript tradition, and explores how physicians in the medieval Muslim world drew on it both to teach medicine to students, and to develop a framework for their own clinical research.
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  13. Michele Barontini & Tito M. Tonietti (2010). ʿumar Al-Khayyām's Contribution to the Arabic Mathematical Theory of Music. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 20 (02):255-280.score: 15.0
    We here present the Arabic text, with an English translation, of certain pages dedicated by al-Khayym with other Arabic theories of Music, and with those coming from other traditions.
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  14. Cristina D'Ancona Costa (1999). Porphyry, Universal Soul and the Arabic Plotinus. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 9 (01):47-.score: 15.0
    Scholars working in the field of Graeco-Arabic Neoplatonism often discuss the role Porphyry, the editor of Plotinus, must be credited with in the formation of the Arabic Plotinian corpus. A note in this corpus apparently suggests that Porphyry provided a commentary to the so-called Theology of Aristotle, i.e., parts of some treatises of Enneads IV-VI. Consequently, Porphyry has been considered as responsible for the (sometimes relevant) doctrinal shifts which affect the Arabic Plotinian paraphrase with respect to the original text. This (...)
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  15. Eberhard Knobloch (2002). The Knowledge of Arabic Mathematics by Clavius. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (2):257-284.score: 15.0
    The article deals with the Arabic sources of Chr. Clavius in Rome and the six different ways they were used by him in mathematics and astronomy. It inquires especially into his attitude towards al-Farghani, Thabit ibn Qurra, al-Bi[tdotu]ruji, Ibn Rushd, Mu[hdotu]ammad al-Baghdadi, Pseudo-Ibn al-Haytham, Jabir ibn Afla[hdotu], and Pseudo-al-[Tuotu]usi.
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  16. Y. Tzvi Langermann (1996). Arabic Writings in Hebrew Manuscripts: A Preliminary Relisting. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 6 (01):137-.score: 15.0
    For many centuries Jews in Arabic-speaking lands have transcribed books written by non-Jews into the Hebrew alphabet; the language remains Arabic, but the writing is Hebrew. This was done mainly for the benefit of those who knew the Arabic language but not the script. The majority of these transcriptions are scientific or philosophical texts. Transcriptions are of value to scholars for two reasons. Some entire texts, or more complete or accurate versions of texts, are preserved only in transcription. In addition, (...)
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  17. Bassam I. El-Eswed (2002). Lead and Tin in Arabic Alchemy. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (1):139-153.score: 15.0
    The present article is devoted to two issues. The first is the identification of lead and tin in medieval Arabic alchemy. The second is the investigation of whether Arabic alchemists differentiate between these problematic substances or not. These two issues are investigated in the light of a comparison which is made between the facts that are stated about the two problematic substances in the original Arabic alchemical works and those stated in modern chemical literature. It is proved that Arabic alchemists (...)
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  18. André Allard (1991). The Arabic Origins and Development of Latin Algorisms in the Twelfth Century. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 1 (02):233-.score: 15.0
    In the absence of the Arabic text of al-Khw's Arithmetic (ca. 825), which has not yet been found, the oldest Latin adaptations from the twelfth century are the only evidence documenting the genesis and the first spreading of a decimal arithmetic that uses nine figures and zero, i.e. the Indian reckoning known in the Middle Ages as algorismus. This paper studies these texts, their content, their sources, and identifies their authors and the milieus in which they were written.
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  19. Tito M. Tonietti (2010). ʿumar Al-Khayyām's Contribution to the Arabic Mathematical Theory of Music. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 20 (2):255-280.score: 15.0
    We here present the Arabic text, with an English translation, of certain pages dedicated by al-Khayym with other Arabic theories of Music, and with those coming from other traditions.
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  20. Gregg de Young (1996). Ex Aequali Ratios in the Greek and Arabic Euclidean Traditions. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 6 (02):167-.score: 15.0
    Euclid discusses the ex aequali relationship twice in the Elements. The first is in Book V (based on definitions 17 and 18, propositions 22 and 23), during his discussion of arithmetical relations between mathematical magnitudes in general. The second is in Books VIIIX (numbers), he was not much troubled by the differences between his treatment of ex aequali ratios in these two contexts. Later generations of mathematicians, however, found these differences less acceptable and tried to minimize them in various ways. (...)
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  21. Tony Lévy (2003). Arabic Algebra in Hebrew Texts (1). An Unpublished Work by Isaac Ben Salomon Al-a[Hudot]Dab (14th Century). Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):269-301.score: 15.0
    It has long been considered that Arabic algebra scarcely left any traces in mathematical literature of Hebrew expression. Thanks to the unpublished sources we have discovered, and to an attentive examination of already-known texts, one can no longer subscribe to such a judgement. The evidence we examine in this first article sheds light on the circulation, in erudite Jewish circles, of Arabic algebraic knowledge in Spain, Italy, Provence, and Sicily, between the 12th and the 14th centuries. The Epistle on number (...)
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  22. Malcom C. Lyons (2002). Poetic Quotations in the Arabic Version of Aristotle's Rhetoric. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (2):197-216.score: 15.0
    The influence of Greek sources on the Arab philosophers is both obvious and important. What is less clear is how the quality of the translations from which the philosophers worked affected their understanding of the points that the Greek writers were making. This article investigates one small but self-contained topic from within the field of translation literature, covering the translations of poetic quotations in the Rhetoric of Aristotle in its Arabic translation, together with an analysis of the types of mistakes (...)
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  23. Soheil M. Afnan (1964). Philosophical Terminology in Arabic and Persian. Leiden, E.J. Brill.score: 15.0
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  24. Karine Chemla (1994). Similarities Between Chinese and Arabic Mathematical Writings: (I) Root Extraction. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 4 (02):207-.score: 15.0
    First century Chinese, fifth century Indian, and Arabic documents from the 9th century onwards, contain similar tabular procedures to extract square and cube roots on place-value numeration systems. Moreover, an 11th century Chinese astronomer, Jia Xian, as well as al-Samaw'al, a 12th century Arab mathematician, extracted roots of higher order with the so-called Ruffini-Horner procedure. This article attempts to define a textual method to organize this corpus, by distinguishing relevant criteria for identifying similarities and differences from a historical as well (...)
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  25. Donald Hill (1991). Arabic Mechanical Engineering: Survey of the Historical Sources. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 1 (02):167-.score: 15.0
    The first and more important section of this article lists all the known treatises in Arabic on Fine Technology – water-clocks, automata, pumps, trick vessels, fountains, etc. The ideas, techniques and components in these treatises are of great importance in the history of machine technology. For each treatise information is given on the provenance of MSS, editions in Arabic and translations, paraphrases or commentaries in modern European languages. In addition to treatises by Arabic writers, similar information is also given on (...)
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  26. Christoph Rymatzki (2012). Johann Heinrich Callenbergs Arabic Publications of De Veritate to the Conversion of Jews and Moslems. Grotiana 33 (1):106-118.score: 15.0
    In the missionary activities that Halle theologians developed in the first half of the 18th century Grotius’ De veritate plays an interesting role that deserves exploration. To that purpose, the history and nature of the publication of missionary tracts in Halle will be surveyed, the role therein of Johann Heinrich Callenberg and his Institutum Judaicum at Muhammedicum described and the distribution and reception of the texts among the Muslims and Jews that were the target of the Halle missions all over (...)
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  27. Elvira Wakelnig (2013). Al-Anṭākī's Use of the Lost Arabic Version of Philoponus'contra Proclum. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 23 (2):291-317.score: 15.0
    Ibn al-Fa's Kitmin, the Book of the Delight of the Believer preserves, in the first part, in at least three of its 100 philosophical and theological problems, passages from the hitherto lost Arabic version of Philoponus' De Aeternitate mundi contra Proclum. All quotations are taken from the refutation of the first proof, one of them from the beginning which is also lost in Greek. For this latter passage a parallel is found in al-Isfiz who draws on the same Philoponus source (...)
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  28. Leila Behrens (1999). Qualities, Objects, Sorts, and Other Treasures: Gold-Digging in English and Arabic. Kölnuniversität Zu Köln, Institut für Sprachwissenschaft.score: 15.0
     
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  29. Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 14.0
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers (such as al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes) or groups, (...)
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  30. De Lacy O'Leary (1939/2003). Arabic Thought and its Place in History. Dover Publications.score: 14.0
    Fascinating and well-documented in its details of cultural migration and evolution, this book offers a well-balanced perspective on the mutual influence of Arabic and Western worlds during the Middle Ages. It traces the transmission of Greek philosophy and science to the Islamic world, forming a portrait of medieval Muslim thought that illustrates its commonalities with Judaic and Christian teachings as well as its points of divergence. He shows how a particular type of Hellenistic culture made its way through the Syrian (...)
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  31. Cecilia Martini Bonadeo (2007). The Arabic Aristotle in the 10th Century Bagdad: The Case of Yaiya Ibn 'Adi's Commentary on Metaph. Alpha Elatton. Veritas 52 (3).score: 14.0
    In this study, we want to show, through the analysis of a Christian author of the 10th. century, how commentaries on the works of Aristotle were continuously made, from the Greek commentators until Averroes. Taking as an example some texts of the Metaphysics, we can see that, even without direct contact with the original Greek version, several translations, both from the Greek and the Syriac, were compared by the author. In those cases, it was not only a translation, but also (...)
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  32. Florentin Smarandache (2007). Neutrosophy in Arabic Philosophy. Renaissance High Press.score: 14.0
    Examples of Neutrosophy used in Arabic philosophy:- While Avicenna promotes the idea that the world is contingent if it is necessitated by its causes, Averroes ...
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  33. Lacy O'Leardey (1939/2003). Arabic Thought and its Place in History. Dover Publications.score: 14.0
    Fascinating and well-documented in its details of cultural migration and evolution, this book offers a well-balanced perspective on the mutual influence of Arabic and Western worlds during the Middle Ages. It traces the transmission of Greek philosophy and science to the Islamic world, forming a portrait of medieval Muslim thought that illustrates its commonalities with Judaic and Christian teachings as well as its points of divergence. He shows how a particular type of Hellenistic culture made its way through the Syrian (...)
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  34. Carmela Baffioni (ed.) (2010). Epistles of the Brethren of Purity: On Logic: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 10-14. Oxford University Press in Association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies.score: 14.0
    The Ikhwan al-Safa (Brethren of Purity), the anonymous adepts of a tenth-century esoteric fraternity based in Basra and Baghdad, hold an eminent position in the history of science and philosophy in Islam due to the wide reception and assimilation of their monumental encyclopaedia, the Rasa'il Ikhwan al-Safa ( Epistles of the Brethren of Purity ). This compendium contains fifty-two epistles offering synoptic accounts of the classical sciences and philosophies of the age; divided into four classificatory parts, it treats themes in (...)
     
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  35. Miklós Maróth (2002). The Changes of Metaphor in Arabic Literature. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (2):241-255.score: 13.0
    Metaphor was based on similarity. During their history the Arabs adopted different logical systems in their scientific investigations. They shifted from Aristotle's logic accepted by the philosophers to that of the theologians and jurisconsults, and later again back to Aristotle's logic. In all these logical systems the definition of metaphor was dependent on the ever changing meaning of “similarity”. The seemingly unchanging definition of metaphor implies different interpretations in different ages parallel to the changing logical background.
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  36. Ahmed Alwishah & David Sanson (2009). The Early Arabic Liar: The Liar Paradox in the Islamic World From the Mid-Ninth to the Mid-Thirteenth Centuries Ce. Vivarium (1):97-127.score: 12.0
    We describe the earliest occurrences of the Liar Paradox in the Arabic tradition. e early Mutakallimūn claim the Liar Sentence is both true and false; they also associate the Liar with problems concerning plural subjects, which is somewhat puzzling. Abharī (1200-1265) ascribes an unsatisfiable truth condition to the Liar Sentence—as he puts it, its being true is the conjunction of its being true and false—and so concludes that the sentence is not true. Tūsī (1201-1274) argues that self-referential sentences, like the (...)
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  37. Marwa Elshakry (2011). Muslim Hermeneutics and Arabic Views of Evolution. Zygon 46 (2):330-344.score: 12.0
    Abstract. Over the last century and a half, discussions of Darwin in Arabic have involved a complex intertwining of sources of authority. This paper reads one of the earliest Muslim responses to modern evolution against those in more recent times to show how questions of epistemology and exegesis have been critically revisited. This involved, on the one hand, the resuscitation of long-standing debates over claims regarding the nature of evidence, certainty, and doubt, and on the other, arguments about the use (...)
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  38. Amos Bertolacci (2005). On the Arabic Translations of Aristotle's Metaphysics. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 15 (2):241-275.score: 12.0
  39. David C. Reisman (2004). Plato's Republic in Arabic a Newly Discovered Passage. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 14 (2):263-300.score: 12.0
  40. Ahmad Y. Al-Hassan (2004). The Arabic Original of Liber de Compositione Alchemiae the Epistle of Maryanus, the Hermit and Philosopher, to Prince Khalid Ibn Yazid. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 14 (2):213-231.score: 12.0
  41. Alexander Treiger (2007). Andrei Iakovlevic Borisov (1903–1942) and His Studies of Medieval Arabic Philosophy. •A.Ia. Borisov, Materialy I Issledovaniia Po Istorii Neoplatonizma Na Srednevekovom Vostoke [=Materials and Studies on the History of Neoplatonism in the Medieval East], Ed. By K. B. Starkova, Pravoslavnyi Palestinskii Sbornik, Issue 99 (36), St. Petersburg, 2002, 256pp., ISBN 5-86007-216-. [REVIEW] Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 17 (1):159-195.score: 12.0
  42. Khaled El-Rouayheb (2009). Impossible Antecedents and Their Consequences: Some Thirteenth-Century Arabic Discussions. History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (3):209-225.score: 12.0
    The principle that a necessarily false proposition implies any proposition, and that a necessarily true proposition is implied by any proposition, was apparently first propounded in twelfth century Latin logic, and came to be widely, though not universally, accepted in the fourteenth century. These principles seem never to have been accepted, or even seriously entertained, by Arabic logicians. In the present study, I explore some thirteenth century Arabic discussions of conditionals with impossible antecedents. The Persian-born scholar Afdal al-Dīn al-Kh najī (...)
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  43. Theophrastus (2010). Theophrastus On First Principles: (Known as His Metaphysics) : Greek Text and Medieval Arabic Translation. Brill Academic Publishers.score: 12.0
    Simultaneous critical editions based on all available evidence, with an introduction, English translations, and commentaries of the Greek text and a medieval Arabic translation of Theophrastus s "On First Principles" ( metaphysics ), ...
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  44. Luis Xavier López-Farjeat (2007). Determinism and Free Will in Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Arabic Tradition. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:161-177.score: 12.0
    The Arabic tradition knew Alexander’s treatises On Fate and On Providence. Alexander criticizes the Stoic determinism with some peripatetic arguments. In those treatises we can find, at least, two positions: the peripatetic and “libertarian” position represented by Alexander, and Stoic determinism. A very similar discussion can be found in Islamic tradition. As S. Van den Bergh has insisted, Islamic theological schools had some Stoic influences. One of the issues in which we can find some common views is, precisely, the problem (...)
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  45. Amir Ljubović (2008). The Works in Logic by Bosniac Authors in Arabic. Brill.score: 12.0
    This book provides a historical and comparative study of logic in Arabic in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from the first texts, 16th century, to the end of the 19th ...
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  46. Nicholas Rescher (1967). Studies in Arabic Philosophy. [Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 12.0
    The ten essays in this book present the thoughts of major Arabic philosophers in history, while speaking to their basis in Greek philosophy and the influence of ...
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  47. Paul Kiparsky, Syllables and Moras in Arabic.score: 12.0
    Some of the most salient differences among Arabic vernaculars have to do with syllable structure. This study focuses on the syllabification patterns of three dialect groups, (1) VC-dialects, (2) C-dialects, and (3) CV-dialects,1 and argues that they differ in the licencing of SEMISYLLA- BLES, moras unaffiliated with syllables and adjoined to higher prosodic constituents. The analysis provides some evidence for a constraint-based version of Lexical Phonology, which treats word phonology and sentence phonology as distinct constraint systems which interact in serial (...)
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  48. Charles E. Butterworth & Blake Andrée Kessel (eds.) (1994). The Introduction of Arabic Philosophy Into Europe. E.J. Brill.score: 12.0
    These essays on the way medieval Arabic philosophy was first introduced into European universities explain their formal working and provide fascinating accounts ...
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  49. George Saliba (2012). In Search of the Unity of the Arabic Science. Metascience 21 (3):741-744.score: 12.0
    In Search of the unity of the Arabic science Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9625-2 Authors George Saliba, Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, 606 West 122nd St, Room 312, New York, NY 10027, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  50. Spence Green & Christopher D. Manning, NP Subject Detection in Verb-Initial Arabic Clauses.score: 12.0
    Phrase re-ordering is a well-known obstacle to robust machine translation for language pairs with significantly different word orderings. For Arabic-English, two languages that usually differ in the ordering of subject and verb, the subject and its modifiers must be accurately moved to produce a grammatical translation. This operation requires more than base phrase chunking and often defies current phrase-based statistical decoders. We present a conditional random field sequence classi- fier that detects the full scope of Arabic noun phrase subjects in (...)
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