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  1. Juan-Carlos Gomez (2011). The Ontogeny of Triadic Cooperative Interactions with Humans in an Infant Gorilla. Interaction Studies 11 (3):353-379.
    This paper reports a longitudinal study on the ontogeny of triadic cooperative interactions (involving coordinations of objects and people) in a hand-reared lowland gorilla ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla ) from 6 months to 36 months of age. Using the behavioural categories developed by Hubley and Trevarthen (1979) to characterize the origins of “secondary intersubjectivity” in human babies between 8-12 months of age, I chart the emergence of comparable coordinations of gestures and actions with objects and acts of dyadic communication. The (...)
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  2. Juan-carlos Gómez (2008). The Evolution of Pretence: From Intentional Availability to Intentional Non-Existence. Mind and Language 23 (5):586-606.
    Abstract: I address the issue of how pretence emerged in evolution by reviewing the (mostly negative) evidence about pretend behaviour in non-human primates, and proposing a model of the type of information processing abilities that humans had to evolve in order to be able to pretend. Non-human primates do not typically pretend: there are just a few examples of potential pretend actions mostly produced by apes. The best, but still rare, examples are produced by so-called 'enculturated' apes (reared by humans) (...)
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  3. Juan-Carlos Gómez (2005). Joint Attention and the Notion of Subject: Insights From Apes, Normal Children, and Children with Autism. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter proposes that the cognitive mechanisms of joint attention (defined as a combination of attention following skills with attention contact skills) are not metarepresentational in nature, but based upon the coordination of two different types of intentional understanding — third-person and second-person intentions — that are represented at the level of a sensorimotor notion of others as subjects. This proposal is developed and analyzed from a comparative perspective through a review of findings concerning apes, typically developing children, and children (...)
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  4. Juan-Carlos Gómez (2005). Developmental Interplay Between Number Systems. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):118-125.
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  5. Juan-Carlos Gomez (1998). Some Thoughts About the Evolution of LADS, with Special Reference to TOM and SAM. In P. Carruthers & J. Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought. Cambridge University Press. 76--93.
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  6. Juan-Carlos Gomez (1996). 19 Non-Human Primate Theories of (Non-Human Primate) Minds: Some Issues Concerning the Origins of Mind-Reading. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 330.
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  7. Juan-Carlos Gomez (1996). Ostensive Behavior in Great Apes: The Role of Eye Contact. In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. 131--151.
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