Search results for 'Judgment (Logic History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    MauriceA Finocchiaro (1988). Empiricism, Judgment, and Argument; Toward an Informal Logic of Science. Argumentation 2 (3):313-335.
    In an attempt to explore the role of argumentation in scientific inquiry, I explore the conception of argument that appears fruitful in the light of the recent trends in the philosophy of science, away from logical empiricism, and toward a greater emphasis on change, disagreement, and history. I begin by contrasting typical instances philosopers’ theories of both empiricism and apriorism, with typical instances of scientists’ uses of these two attitudes, suggesting that such practice shows a judiciousness lacking in epistemological (...)
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  2. Wayne Martin (2006). Theories of Judgment: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology. Cambridge University Press.
    The exercise of judgement is an aspect of human endeavour from our most mundane acts to our most momentous decisions. In this book Wayne Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgement, focusing on treatments of judgement in psychology, logic, phenomenology and painting. He traces attempts to develop theories of judgement in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, experimental neuropsychology and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but (...)
     
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  3. Wayne Martin (2009). Theories of Judgment: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology. Cambridge University Press.
    The exercise of judgement is an aspect of human endeavour from our most mundane acts to our most momentous decisions. In this book Wayne Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgement, focusing on treatments of judgement in psychology, logic, phenomenology and painting. He traces attempts to develop theories of judgement in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, experimental neuropsychology and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but (...)
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  4. Jean-François Lyotard (1994). Lessons on the Analytic of the Sublime: Kant's Critique of Judgment, [Sections] 23-29. Stanford University Press.
    Philosophical aesthetics have seen an amazing revival over the past decade, as a radical questioning of the very grounds of Western epistemology has revealed that descriptions of what used to be seen as specific to aesthetic experience can instead be viewed as a general model for human cognition. In this revival, no text in the classical corpus of Western philosophy has been more frequently discussed and debated than the dense, complex paragraphs inserted into Kant's Critique of Judgment as sections (...)
     
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  5.  15
    Corey W. Dyck, Kant on Wolff's General Logic.
    In this paper, I consider the basis for Kant's praise of Wolff's general logic as "the best we have." I argue that Wolff's logic was highly esteemed by Kant on account of its novel analysis of the three operations of the mind (tres operationes mentis), in the course of which Wolff formulates an argument for the priority of the understanding's activity of judging.
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  6. der Schaar & Maria Sandra (1991). G.F. Stout's Theory of Judgment and Proposition: Proefschrift Ter Verkrijging Van De Graad Van Doktor. M.S. Van Der Schaar.
  7. Graham Wallas (1934). Social Judgment. London, G. Allen & Unwin.
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  8.  75
    Kevin J. Harrelson (2015). Logic and Ontology in Hegel's Theory of Predication. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1259-1280.
    In this paper I sketch some arguments that underlie Hegel's chapter on judgment, and I attempt to place them within a broad tradition in the history of logic. Focusing on his analysis of simple predicative assertions or ‘positive judgments’, I first argue that Hegel supplies an instructive alternative to the classical technique of existential quantification. The main advantage of his theory lies in his treatment of the ontological implications of judgments, implications that are inadequately captured by quantification. The (...)
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  9.  39
    Günter Zöller (2008). Kant and the Problem of Existential Judgment: Critical Comments on Wayne Martin's Theories of Judgment. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 137 (1):121 - 134.
    The paper assesses Martin's recent logico-phenomenological account of judgment that is cast in the form of an eclectic history of judging, from Hume and Kant through the 19th century to Frege and Heidegger as well as current neuroscience. After a preliminary discussion of the complex unity and temporal modalities of judgment that draws on a reading of Titian's "Allegory of Prudence" (National Gallery, London), the remainder of the paper focuses on Martin's views on Kant's logic in general (...)
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  10.  17
    Peter Baumanns (1981). Kant's Logic of Aesthetic Judgment. Philosophy and History 14 (1):23-25.
  11.  10
    Luke O'Sullivan (2008). Our Knowledge of the Past: Tucker, Bayes, and the Logic of Historical Judgment. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (2):250-262.
  12. Ralph Walker (1994). New Kant Books: The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant: Vol. I, Theoretical Philosophy, 1755-1770. Ed. And Tr. By D. Walford in Collaboration with R. Meerbote, Cambridge University Press, 1992. Lxxxi + 543 Pp. Pound50.00 The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant: Vol. DC, Lectures on Logic. Ed. And Tr. By J. Michael Young, Cambridge University Press, 1992. Xxxii + 695 Pp. Pound50.00 The Genesis of Kant's Critique of Judgment by John H. Zammito, University of Chicago Press, 1992.490 Pp. Pound51.95 Hb; Pound15.25 Pb. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (1):165-174.
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  13.  32
    Robert Wicks (2007). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Kant on Judgment. Routledge.
    Kant’s Critique of Judgment is one of the most important texts in the history of modern aesthetics. This GuideBook discusses the third Critique section by section, and introduces and assesses: Kant's life and the background of the Critique of Judgment the ideas and text of the Critique of Judgment , including a critical explanation of Kant’s theories of natural beauty The continuing relevance of Kant’s work to contemporary philosophy and aesthetics This GuideBook is an accessible introduction (...)
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  14.  2
    John Loius Lucaites & Charles A. Taylor (1993). Theorizing the Grounds of Rhetorical Judgment. Informal Logic 15 (1).
    Prudence has long been an important topic for rhetorical theorists and its place in intellectual history is becoming increasingly well documented. This essay develops a conception of prudence as an ideological construct, a term crafted in the history of its public usages to govern the relationship between common sense and political action as enacted in the name of historically situated social actors. From this perspective, prudence represents the recursive interaction between a rhetoric of judgment and the grounds (...)
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  15.  29
    Philip R. Shields (1993). Logic and Sin in the Writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein. University of Chicago Press.
    Philip R. Shields shows that ethical and religious concerns inform even the most technical writings on logic and language, and that, for Wittgenstein, the need to establish clear limitations is both a logical and an ethical demand. Rather than merely saying specific things about theology and religion, major texts from the Tractatus to the Philosophical Investigations express their fundamentally religious nature by showing that there are powers which bear down upon and sustain us. Shields finds a religious view of the (...)
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  16.  3
    Wayne Martin (2008). Theories of Judgment. Philosophical Studies 137 (1):121-134.
    The paper assesses Martin's recent logico-phenomenological account of judgment that is cast in the form of an eclectic history of judging, from Hume and Kant through the 19th century to Frege and Heidegger as well as current neuroscience. After a preliminary discussion of the complex unity and temporal modalities of judgment that draws on a reading of Titian's "Allegory of Prudence" , the remainder of the paper focuses on Martin's views on Kant's logic in general and his (...)
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  17.  1
    Bernard Bosanquet (1912). Logic, or the Morphology of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 21 (6):716-716.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. Much of his work focused on the place of logic in philosophy, especially its role in metaphysical thought - the area where he is considered to have made (...)
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  18.  40
    Rudolf A. Makkreel (1990). Imagination and Interpretation in Kant: The Hermeneutical Import of the Critique of Judgment. University of Chicago Press.
    In this illuminating study of Kant's theory of imagination and its role in interpretation, Rudolf A. Makkreel argues against the commonly held notion that Kant's transcendental philosophy is incompatible with hermeneutics. The charge that Kant's foundational philosophy is inadequate to the task of interpretation can be rebutted, explains Makkreel, if we fully understand the role of imagination in his work. In identifying this role, Makkreel also reevaluates the relationship among Kant's discussions of the feeling of life, common sense, and the (...)
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  19.  3
    Christopher Fear (2013). The Question-and-Answer Logic of Historical Context. History of the Human Sciences 26 (3):68-81.
    Quentin Skinner has enduringly insisted that a past text cannot be ‘understood’ without the reader knowing something about its historical and linguistic context. But since the 1970s he has been attacked on this central point of all his work by authors maintaining that the text itself is the fundamental guide to the author’s intention, and that a separate study of the context cannot tell the historian anything that the text itself could not. Mark Bevir has spent much of the last (...)
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  20.  45
    Wayne Martin, Fichte's Logical Legacy: Thetic Judgment From the Wissenschaftslehre to Brentano.
    It is not usual to think of Fichte as a logician, nor indeed to think of him as leaving a legacy that shaped the subsequent history of symbolic logic. But I argue here that there is such a legacy, and that Fichte formulated an agenda in formal logic that his students (and their students in turn) used to spark a logical revolution. That revolution arguably reached its culmination in the logical writings of Franz Brentano, better known as a founding (...)
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  21. Bernard Bosanquet (1885). Knowledge and Reality a Criticism of Mr. F.H. Bradley's "Principles of Logic". Kegan Paul, Trench.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. He wrote numerous articles before beginning this book, which was his first and was published in 1885 as a response to the Principles of Logic, published in 1883, (...)
     
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  22. Bernard Bosanquet (2012). Knowledge and Reality: A Criticism of Mr F. H. Bradley's ‘Principles of Logic'. Cambridge University Press.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. He wrote numerous articles before beginning this book, which was his first and was published in 1885 as a response to the Principles of Logic, published in 1883, (...)
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  23. Bernard Bosanquet (2011). Logic: Or, the Morphology of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. Much of his work focused on the place of logic in philosophy, especially its role in metaphysical thought - the area where he is considered to have made (...)
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  24. Bernard Bosanquet (2011). Logic 2 Volume Set: Or, the Morphology of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. Much of his work focused on the place of logic in philosophy, especially its role in metaphysical thought - the area where he is considered to have made (...)
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  25. Bernard Bosanquet (2012). Logic: Volume 1: Or, the Morphology of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. Much of his work focused on the place of logic in philosophy, especially its role in metaphysical thought - the area where he is considered to have made (...)
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  26. Bernard Bosanquet (2013). Logic: Volume 2: Or, the Morphology of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. Much of his work focused on the place of logic in philosophy, especially its role in metaphysical thought - the area where he is considered to have made (...)
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  27. Maria Concetta Di Maio (1992). Inductive Logic and the Foundations of Probability Theory: A Revaluation of Carnap's Program. Dissertation, Princeton University
    In this thesis I defend and pursue that line about the foundations of probability theory which has come to be known as "the logicist view about probability", and, in particular, the shape which it took in Carnap's Inductive Logic. ;Most philosophers who now deal with probability theory claim that Carnap's program of Inductive Logic has failed. The main aim of my thesis is to show that this judgment is based on a fundamental misunderstanding about the nature and the aim (...)
     
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  28. Scott L. Pratt (2015). Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order. Wiley.
    _An enlightening introduction to the study of logic: its history, philosophical foundations, and formal structures_ _Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order_ is the first book of its kind to frame the study of introductory logic in terms of problems connected to wider issues of knowledge and judgment that arise in the context of racial, cultural, and religious diversity. With its accessible style and integration of philosophical inquiry and real-life concerns, this book offers a novel approach to the theory of (...)
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  29. Scott L. Pratt (2015). Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order. Wiley.
    _An enlightening introduction to the study of logic: its history, philosophical foundations, and formal structures_ _Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order_ is the first book of its kind to frame the study of introductory logic in terms of problems connected to wider issues of knowledge and judgment that arise in the context of racial, cultural, and religious diversity. With its accessible style and integration of philosophical inquiry and real-life concerns, this book offers a novel approach to the theory of (...)
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  30. Scott L. Pratt (2015). Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order. Wiley.
    _An enlightening introduction to the study of logic: its history, philosophical foundations, and formal structures_ _Logic: Inquiry, Argument, and Order_ is the first book of its kind to frame the study of introductory logic in terms of problems connected to wider issues of knowledge and judgment that arise in the context of racial, cultural, and religious diversity. With its accessible style and integration of philosophical inquiry and real-life concerns, this book offers a novel approach to the theory of (...)
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  31.  31
    Dirk Greimann (2014). Frege on Truth, Assertoric Force and the Essence of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (3):272-288.
    In a posthumous text written in 1915, Frege makes some puzzling remarks about the essence of logic, arguing that the essence of logic is indicated, properly speaking, not by the word ‘true’, but by the assertoric force. William Taschek has recently shown that these remarks, which have received only little attention, are very important for understanding Frege's conception of logic. On Taschek's reconstruction, Frege characterizes logic in terms of assertoric force in order to stress the normative role that the logical (...)
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  32.  36
    Maria van Der Schaar (2008). Locke and Arnauld on Judgment and Proposition. History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (4):327-341.
    To understand pre-Fregean theories of judgment and proposition, such as those found in Locke and the Port-Royal logic, it is important to distinguish between propositions in the modern sense and propositions in the pre-Fregean sense. By making this distinction it becomes clear that these pre-Fregean theories cannot be meant to solve the propositional attitude problem. Notwithstanding this fact, Locke and Arnauld are able to make a distinction between asserted and unasserted propositions (in their sense). The way Locke makes this (...)
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  33.  43
    Gregory Landini (1991). A New Interpretation of Russell's Multiple-Relation Theory of Judgment. History and Philosophy of Logic 12 (1):37-69.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Russell's multiple-relation theory of judgment which characterizes it as direct application of the 1905 theory of definite descriptions. The paper maintains that it was by regarding propositional symbols (when occurring as subordinate clauses) as disguised descriptions of complexes, that Russell generated the philosophical explanation of the hierarchy of orders and the ramified theory of types of _Principia mathematica (1910). The interpretation provides a new understanding of Russell's abandoned book _Theory of Knowledge (1913), the (...)
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  34.  64
    Michael Kremer (2000). Judgment and Truth in Frege. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):549-581.
    Thomas Ricketts has developed a powerful interpretation of Frege on judgment, truth and logic. Recently, Ricketts has modified his reading, holding that judgment is an act of knowledge-acquisition; this rules out incorrect judgment. I argue that Ricketts goes too far here. I criticize the textual basis for Ricketts's new view, and show that the interpretive problems which led him to this change can be met without such extreme measures. Thus, I defend Ricketts' earlier view against his own (...)
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  35.  52
    Leslie Stevenson (2004). Freedom of Judgement in Descartes, Hume, Spinoza and Kant. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):223 – 246.
    Is our judgement of the truth-value of propositions subject to the will? Do we have any voluntary control over the formation of our beliefs – and if so, how does it compare with the control we have over our actions? These questions lead into interestingly unclear philosophical and psychological territory which remains a focus of debate today. I will first examine the classic early modern discussions in Descartes, Spinoza and Hume. Then I will review some relevant themes in Kant, including (...)
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  36.  51
    Edward Witherspoon (2002). Logic and the Inexpressible in Frege and Heidegger. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):89-113.
    Frege and Heidegger appear to appear to have diametrically opposed attitudes towards logic. Frege thinks logic must govern any investigation whatsoever, whereas Heidegger (in "What is Metaphysics?") apparently wants to dismantle logic. But when they try to explicate the nature of judgment, a striking similarity emerges. For while their accounts of judgment are radically different, each finds his account to be, by his own lights, _inexpressible. This paper shows how Heidegger and Frege arrive at their respective accounts of (...)
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  37.  17
    Mark Textor (2013). 'Thereby We Have Broken with the Old Logical Dualism'–Reinach on Negative Judgement and Negation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):570 - 590.
    Does (affirmative) judgement have a logical dual, negative judgement? Whether there is such a logical dualism was hotly debated at the beginning of the twentieth century. Frege argued in ?Negation? (1918/9) that logic can dispense with negative judgement. Frege's arguments shaped the views of later generations of analytic philosophers, but they will not have convinced such opponents as Brentano or Windelband. These philosophers believed in negative judgement for psychological, not logical, reasons. Reinach's ?On the Theory of Negative Judgement? (1911) spoke (...)
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  38.  5
    W. R. Lund (1992). Hobbes on Opinion, Private Judgment and Civil War. History of Political Thought 13 (1):51.
    The precise relationship between Hobbes's political philosophy and his late history of the English Civil War remains something of a puzzle. Given his well known doubts about the epistemological status of history, Behemoth or the Long Parliament is often treated as little more than a procrustean effort at forcing complex historical events into the bed of abstract theory that he had developed earlier. On this view, even Noam Flinker, who offers one of the few studies devoted to a (...)
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  39.  17
    Thomas S. Weston (2008). The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 490-491.
    As the subtitle suggests, the book is organized around the themes of judgment, inference and truth. Material for the first two topics is largely taken from the second edition of Bradley's Principles of Logic. The discussion of his conception of truth relies on essays written in reply to various authors. In general, the book is to be welcomed by students of Bradley for its remarkably clear and unpretentious exposition of central themes in these difficult topics.Much of the book is (...)
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  40. Donald Kelley (1987). Ancient Verses on New Ideas: Legal Tradition and the French Historical School. History and Theory 26 (3):319-338.
    Romantic, po st- Revolutionary French historiography can be described as "ancient verses on new ideas." The "new history" of this period, with its antiquarian nature, shared more with its predecessors than its practitioners acknowledged. Historical and legal scholars of the Restoration belonged to a long intellectual tradition of a shared hermeneutical "community of interpretation," based on common origins, though not necessarily goals. A belief in the historical grounding of knowledge and judgment united Restoration historians and legal scholars to (...)
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  41.  67
    Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2004). Multigrade Predicates. Mind 113 (452):609-681.
    The history of the idea of predicate is the history of its emancipation. The lesson of this paper is that there are two more steps to take. The first is to recognize that predicates need not have a fixed degree, the second that they can combine with plural terms. We begin by articulating the notion of a multigrade predicate: one that takes variably many arguments. We counter objections to the very idea posed by Peirce, Dummett's Frege, and Strawson. (...)
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  42.  44
    John Turri (forthcoming). Perceptions of Philosophical Inquiry: A Survey. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-12.
    Six hundred three people completed a survey measuring perceptions of traditional areas of philosophical inquiry and their relationship to empirical science. The ten areas studied were: aesthetics, epistemology, ethics, history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and political philosophy. For each area, participants rated whether it is currently central to philosophy, whether its centrality depends on integration with science, and whether work in the area is sufficiently integrated with science. Centrality judgments tended (...)
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  43.  8
    Maurice A. Finocchiaro (2005). Arguments About Arguments: Systematic, Critical, and Historical Essays in Logical Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Following an approach that is empirical but not psychological, and dialectical but not dialogical, Maurice Finocchiaro defines concepts such as reasoning, argument, argument analysis, critical reasoning, methodological reflection, judgment, critical thinking, and informal logic. Including extended critiques of the views of many contemporary scholars, he also integrates into the discussion Arnauld's Port-Royal Logic, Gramsci's theory of intellectuals, and case studies from the history of science, particularly the work of Galileo, Newton, Huygens, and Lavoisier.
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  44.  32
    Chris Fraser (2013). Distinctions, Judgment, and Reasoning in Classical Chinese Thought. History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (1):1-24.
  45.  49
    Jennifer Mensch (2011). Intuition and Nature in Kant and Goethe. European Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):431-453.
    Abstract: This essay addresses three specific moments in the history of the role played by intuition in Kant's system. Part one develops Kant's attitude toward intuition in order to understand how ‘sensible intuition’ becomes the first step in his development of transcendental idealism and how this in turn requires him to reject the possibility of an ‘intellectual intuition’ for human cognition. Part two considers the role of Jacobi when it came to interpreting both Kant's epistemic achievement and what were (...)
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  46. M. van der Schaar (2009). Judgement, Belief and Accepance. In Giuseppe Primiero (ed.), Acts of Knowledge: History, Philosophy and Logic. College Publications
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  47.  24
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida (...)
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  48.  23
    Shuren Wang (2009). The Roots of Chinese Philosophy and Culture — an Introduction to “ Xiang ” and “ Xiang Thinking”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):1-12.
    To grasp the truth in traditional Chinese classics, we need to uncover the long obscured xiang 象 (image) thinking, which has long been overshadowed by Occidentalism. xiang thinking is the most fundamental thought of human beings. The logic of linguistics all comes from xiang thinking . Through conceptual thinking, people can understand Western classics on metaphysics, yet they may not completely understand the various schools of Chinese classics. The difference between Chinese and Western ways of thinking originated in the difference (...)
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  49.  14
    Henrik Lübker (2012). The Method of In-Between in the Grotesque and the Works of Leif Lage. Continent 2 (3):170-181.
    “Artworks are not being but a process of becoming” —Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory In the everyday use of the concept, saying that something is grotesque rarely implies anything other than saying that something is a bit outside of the normal structure of language or meaning – that something is a peculiarity. But in its historical use the concept has often had more far reaching connotations. In different phases of history the grotesque has manifested its forms as a means (...)
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  50.  10
    Shahid Rahman (forthcoming). Essay on Russell on Modalities and Frege on Judgement. History and Philosophy of Logic.
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