Search results for 'Judith Areen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Judith Areen (1991). Advance Directives Under State Law and Judicial Decisions. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 19 (1-2):91-100.
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  2. Judith Areen (1991). Advance Directives Under State Law and Judicial Decisions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):91-100.
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  3.  37
    A. C. Rietjens Judith, J. Der Maas Pauvanl, D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen Bregje, J. M. Delden Johannevans & Agnes van der Heide (2009). Two Decades of Research on Euthanasia From the Netherlands. What Have We Learnt and What Questions Remain? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3).
    Two decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to the regulating and public control of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. No slippery slope seems to have occurred. Physicians seem to adhere to the criteria for due care in the large majority of cases. Further, it has been shown (...)
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  4. Sánchez Flores & Mónica Judith (2005). Political Philosophy for the Global Age. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In a time of globalization, Political Philosophy for the Global Age provides a theoretical basis for the convergence of human values in terms of legitimate conceptions of time, language, and notions of self. Sánchez Flores reviews what she considers to be the most important positions in the current debate on political theory (liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and postcolonialism) and also proposes her own original contribution. Sánchez Flores’s unique approach is a critique of a type of morality formulated solely on the basis (...)
     
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  5.  31
    Carolyn Culbertson (2013). The Ethics of Relationality: Judith Butler and Social Critique. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):449-463.
    This article takes up the work of Judith Butler in order to present a vision of ethics that avoids two common yet problematic positions: on the one hand, the skeptical position that ethical norms are so constitutive of who we are that they are ultimately impossible to assess and, on the other hand, the notion that we are justified in our commitment to any ethical norm that appears foundational to our identity. With particular attention to the trajectory of Butler’s (...)
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  6.  17
    Shaun Young (2007). Avoiding the Unavoidable? Judith Shklar's Unwilling Search for an Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 13 (3):231-253.
    No less an authority than John Rawls identified Judith Shklar as a ‘political’ liberal. However, though their respective conceptions of political liberalism are similar in a number of important respects, Shklar emphasizes that her vision differs notably from that of Rawls. In particular, she explicitly eschews Rawls’s focus on establishing and sustaining an overlapping consensus, arguing that his belief in the possibility of securing such a consensus is naïve and, indeed, dangerous insofar as it embodies an obvious disregard for (...)
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  7. Gabriel Girard, Olivier Neveux & Judith Butler (2009). VIOLENCE D'ÉTAT, COALITIONS, SUJETS: Un Entretien de Gabriel GIRARD Et Olivier NEVEUX Avec Judith BUTLER. Actuel Marx 45:164 - 174.
    State Violence, Coalitions, Subjects After a consideration of the reception of her work in France , Judith Butler assesses the political contribution of queer movements and minority struggles. She addresses the need for the left to reappropriate the forthright critique of the State and its violence and to examine the way minorities are produced. To do so, her analysis starts from the question of immigrant persons. She highlights the issues and the difficulties which are involved, if there is to (...)
     
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  8. Judith Butler & Sara Salih (2004). The Judith Butler Reader.
  9.  90
    K. Forrester (2012). Judith Shklar, Bernard Williams and Political Realism. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):247-272.
    In light of recent interest among political theorists in the idea of political realism, Judith Shklar’s liberalism of fear has come to be associated with anti-Rawlsian thought. This paper seeks to show that, on the contrary, Shklar’s specific formulation of political realism, unlike more recent variations, was not motivated by a critique of Rawls. This paper will address three concerns: first, it will show what exactly Shklar’s initial realism was responding to; second, it will consider the implications of this (...)
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  10.  17
    Elena Loizidou (2007). Judith Butler: Ethics, Law, Politics. Routledge-Cavendish.
    The first to use Judith Butlers work as a reading of how the legal subject is formed, this book traces how Butler comes to the themes of ethics, law and ...
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  11.  33
    Judith Butler, Drucilla Cornell, Pheng Cheah & E. A. Grosz (1998). The Future of Sexual Difference: An Interview with Judith Butler and Drucilla Cornell. Diacritics 28 (1):19-42.
  12.  34
    Sara Salih (2002). Judith Butler. Routledge.
    A welcome addition to the Routledge Critical Thinkers series, Judith Butler is the first guidebook on this renowned feminist and queer theory scholar, which will help not only students of literary criticism but also students of law, sociology, philosophy, film and cultural studies. Examining Butler's work through a variety of contexts, including the formation of gender performativity, identity and subjecthood, Sarah Salih address Butler's crucial ideas on the gender agenda, the body, pornography, race, gay self-expression and power and (...)
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  13.  30
    Joris Vlieghe (2010). Judith Butler and the Public Dimension of the Body: Education, Critique and Corporeal Vulnerability. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):153-170.
    In this paper I discuss some thoughts Judith Butler presents regarding corporeal vulnerability. This might help to elucidate the problem of whether critical education is still possible today. I first explain why precisely the possibility of critique within education is a problem for us today. This is because the traditional means of enhancing a critical attitude in pupils, stimulating their self-reflective capacities, contributes to the continued existence and strengthening of the current societal and political regime. A way out of (...)
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  14.  39
    Alison Stone (2005). Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4-24.
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within (...)
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  15.  33
    Kathy Dow Magnus (2006). The Unaccountable Subject: Judith Butler and the Social Conditions of Intersubjective Agency. Hypatia 21 (2):81 - 103.
    Judith Butler's Kritik der ethischen Gewalt represents a significant refinement of her position on the relationship between the construction of the subject and her social subjection. While Butler's earlier texts reflect a somewhat restricted notion of agency, her Adorno Lectures formulate a notion of agency that extends beyond mere resistance. This essay traces the development of Butler's account of agency and evaluates it in light of feminist projects of social transformation.
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  16. Amy Allen (2005). Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that (...)
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  17.  2
    Matthew C. Halteman (2015). Review of Judith Wolfe's Heidegger and Theology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 112.
    When a slim, winsomely-written introductory volume manages accessibly to survey many of the most important signposts across Heidegger's path, does so in a way that both excavates new sources and puts them to constructive use, is historically-informed but futurally-minded and generous but critical -- that's an achievement. What's more, Judith Wolfe accomplishes these things while illuminating the rich but underemphasized hermeneutic significance for Heidegger's work of his lifelong struggle to reconcile himself to the Christian moorings of his (...)
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  18.  25
    James Stanescu (2012). Species Trouble: Judith Butler, Mourning, and the Precarious Lives of Animals. Hypatia 27 (3):567-582.
    This article utilizes the work of Judith Butler in order to chart a queer and feminist animal studies, an animal studies that celebrates our shared embodied finitude. Butler's commentary on other animals remains dispersed and fragmented throughout books, lectures, and interviews over the course of the last several years. This work is critically synthesized in conjunction with her work on mourning and precarious lives. By developing an anti-anthropocentric understanding of mourning and precarious lives, this article hopes to create ontological, (...)
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  19.  3
    Kamila Stullerova (2014). The Knowledge of Suffering: On Judith Shklar’s ‘Putting Cruelty First’. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):23-45.
    Stullerova, K.. The Knowledge of Suffering: On Judith Shklar's 'Putting Cruelty First'. Contemporary Political Theory, 13, 23-45.
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  20.  26
    Francis J. Beckwith (2014). Does Judith Jarvis Thomson Really Grant the Pro-Life View of Fetal Personhood in Her Defense of Abortion? International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):443-451.
    In her ground-breaking 1971 article, “A Defense of Abortion,” Judith Jarvis Thomson argues that even if one grants to the prolifer her most important premise—that the fetus is a person—the prolifer’s conclusion, the intrinsic wrongness of abortion, does not follow. However, in her 1995 article, “Abortion: Whose Right?,” Thomson employs Rawlsian liberalism to argue that even though the prolifer’s view of fetal personhood is not unreasonable, the prochoice advocate is not unreasonable in rejecting it. Thus, because we should err (...)
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  21.  34
    E. Ferrarese (2011). Judith Butler's 'Not Particularly Postmodern Insight' of Recognition. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):759-773.
    Although Judith Butler regards recognition as the theme unifying her work, one finds a striking absence of dialogue between her and the authors of the normative theories of recognition – Honneth, Habermas, Ricoeur, etc. In the present article I seek to call into question this sentiment, shared by the two sides, of a radical theoretical heterogeneity. First I seek to show that the theory of performativity which Butler developed initially, contrary to all expectations, sets her relatively apart from the (...)
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  22. Gilbert Harman (2011). Judith Jarvis Thomson's Normativity. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 154 (3):435 - 441.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson’s Normativity Content Type Journal Article Pages 435-441 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9737-y Authors Gilbert Harman, Department of Philosophy, Princeton University, 1879 Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116 Journal Volume Volume 154 Journal Issue Volume 154, Number 3.
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  23.  4
    Ariel Martínez (2015). The tension between materiality and discourse: Judith Butler’s notion of body. Cinta de Moebio 54:325-335.
    This article proposes to analyse the way in which the body is addressed in the philosophical works of Judith Butler. The constructionism that characterizes her initial articles has been widely spread in the contemporary debates about sex and gender diversity, since in those articles she links the body to a discursive ontology that denounces the contingent and unnecessary welding between body -which is considered as the substantial and natural basis of gender and sexuality- and subjective identities. Such an epistemological (...)
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  24.  9
    Cécile Fabre (2010). Preparing for Politics: Judith Butler's Ethical Dispositions. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):284-303.
    The question of Judith Butler's ‘politics’ and their normative justification has been raised by critics and supporters alike for some time. The number of recent texts dedicated to this topic suggests that it remains an unresolved and still pressing question. I argue that in order to identify and evaluate the political implications of Butler's work, we must first recognize the relationship and distinction between four vectors of her thinking: her diagnosis of the human condition, her expression of specific normative (...)
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  25.  57
    C. Leah Devlin & P. J. Capelotti (1996). Proximity to Seacoast: G. W. Field and the Marine Laboratory at Point Judith Pond, Rhode Island, 1896-1900. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 29 (2):251 - 265.
    By the time George Wilton Field concluded his work at the marine laboratory his initial scientific concerns had forced him directly into local politics. He pleaded with little success with the community of South Kingstown, and with no success with the town of Narragansett, to create and maintain a permanent breach:Is it not possible for the acute business sense and the broad philanthropy of the community to sweep aside petty, local, and personal jealousies which are now blocking practical progress for (...)
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  26.  20
    Judith Butler & William E. Connolly (2000). Politics, Power and Ethics: A Discussion Between Judith Butler and William Connolly. Theory and Event 4 (2).
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  27.  29
    Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.) (2008). Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
    Judith Butler has been arguably the most important gender theorist of the past twenty years. This edited volume draws leading international political theorists into dialogue with her political theory. Each chapter is written by an acclaimed political theorist and concentrates on a particular aspect of Butler's work. The book is divided into five sections which reflect the interdisciplinary nature of Butler's work and activism: Butler and Philosophy: explores Butler’s unique relationship to the discipline of philosophy, considering her work in (...)
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  28.  5
    V. Bell (1999). On Speech, Race and Melancholia: An Interview with Judith Butler. Theory, Culture and Society 16 (2):163-174.
    In this interview, Judith Butler speaks about her most recent work, especially Excitable Speech , in terms of how it represents a continuation of certain themes and how it represents moves into new terrains of debate. In particular, she addresses both possible critiques of her work, expecially around the issue of the possibility of political visions and the attention to speech when theorizing subjectification, and responds to questions around certain related themes such as: just what is the possibility of (...)
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  29. Judith Butler & Bronwyn Davies (eds.) (2007). Judith Butler in Conversation: Analyzing the Texts and Talk of Everyday Life. Routledge.
     
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  30. Peter Osborne, Lynne Segal & Judith Butler (1994). Interview: Judith Butler: Gender as Performance. Radical Philosophy 67.
  31.  8
    Tom Boland (2007). Critique as a Technique of Self: A Butlerian Analysis of Judith Butler's Prefaces. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):105-122.
    This article considers `critique' as performative, being on the one hand a reiterative performance, that enacts the `critic' through the act of critique, and on the other hand reflecting the constitution of the subject. While this approach takes on the conceptual framework of Judith Butler's work, it differs by refusing critique — or its correlates; parody, subversion or similar — any special status. Like any other performance critique is taken here as a cultural practice, as a Foucauldian `technique of (...)
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  32.  33
    Christa Hodapp (2013). Giving an Account of Oneself by Judith Butler (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):115-118.
    The chapters of Judith Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself originally were given as the Spinoza Lectures for the Department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam in the spring of 2002. In this work, Butler returns to the problem of subjectivity and subject formation, but this time in the context of ethics and ethical philosophy. Pulling together ethical considerations and theories of the self from authors including Nietzsche, Foucault, Adorno, and Levinas, Butler deftly and successfully decenters and refocuses (...)
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  33.  3
    Iwona Janicka (2015). Queering Girard—De-Freuding Butler: A Theoretical Encounter Between Judith Butler's Gender Performativity and René Girard's Mimetic Theory. Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 22 (1):43-64.
    This article attempts to respond to the fractional presence of feminist discourse around René Girard’s theory of mimetic desire. I will first briefly examine the relevant critical stands on mimesis and then proceed to rehabilitate it for feminism via an analysis of Judith Butler’s theory of performative gender. By bringing together selected aspects of Girard and Butler’s work, it will be possible to build a constructive dialogue between the two thinkers. Due to the scope of the paper I will (...)
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  34.  18
    Michael Feola (2014). Norms, Vision and Violence: Judith Butler on the Politics of Legibility. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):130-148.
    Judith Butler’s meditations on precarity have received considerable attention in recent years. This article proposes that an undertheorized strain of her argument offers productive resources for theorizing violence. The question extends beyond material acts, to ask how certain groups are rendered eligible for heightened, regularized violence – and, by extension, how liberal subjects are rendered complicit with policies at odds with their universalist commitments. At stake is a politics of sensibility that complicates and enriches juridico-institutionalist models. That said, when (...)
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  35.  16
    David W. McIvor (2012). Bringing Ourselves to Grief: Judith Butler and the Politics of Mourning. Political Theory 40 (4):409 - 436.
    Within political theory there has been a recent surge of interest in the themes of loss, grief, and mourning. In this paper i address questions about the politics of mourning through a critical engagement of the work of Judith Butler. I argue that Butler's work remains tethered to an account of melancholic subjectivity derived from her early reading of Freud. These investments in melancholia compromise Butler's recent ethico-political interventions by obscuring the ambivalence of political engagements and the possibilities of (...)
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  36.  24
    Noela Davis (2012). Subjected Subjects? On Judith Butler's Paradox of Interpellation. Hypatia 27 (3):881 - 897.
    Judith Butler's theory of the constitution of subjectivity conceptualizes the subject as a performative materialization of its social environment. In her theory Butler utilizes Louis Althusser's notion of interpellation, and she critiques the constitutive paradoxes to which its tautological framing leads. Although there is no pre-existing subject, as it is constituted in the turn to the interpellative hail, Butler nonetheless theorizes a guilt and compulsion acting on an “individual” that compels his or her turn to answer the hail. There (...)
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  37.  10
    Laecio Almeida Gomes & Thaline Luize Ribeiro Fontenele (2010). LINS, Maria Judith Sucupira da Costa. Educação Moral na Perspectiva de Alasdair MacIntyre. Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 1 (1):77-81.
    Resenha do livro de Maria Judith Sucupira da Costa Lins "Educação Moral na Perspectiva de Alasdair MacIntyre".
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  38.  36
    Marcel Stoetzler (2005). Subject Trouble: Judith Butler and Dialectics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (3):343-368.
    In this essay I explore the role of dialectics for how social theory can take account of the problem of structure and agency, or, determination and freedom, in a critical and emancipatory way. I discuss the limits and possibilities of dialectical, and of anti-dialectical, criticisms of Hegelian dialectics. For this purpose, I look at Judith Butler’s discussion of dialectics and the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ in her writings between 1987 ( Subjects of Desire ; republished 1999) and 1990 (...)
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  39.  36
    Kathleen Dow Magnus (2006). The Unaccountable Subject: Judith Butler and the Social Conditions of Intersubjective Agency. Hypatia 21 (2):81-103.
    : Judith Butler's Kritik der ethischen Gewalt represents a significant refinement of her position on the relationship between the construction of the subject and her social subjection. While Butler's earlier texts reflect a somewhat restricted notion of agency, her Adorno Lectures formulate a notion of agency that extends beyond mere resistance. This essay traces the development of Butler's account of agency and evaluates it in light of feminist projects of social transformation.
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  40.  3
    Amy Billingsley (2015). Hope in a Vice: Carole Pateman, Judith Butler, and Suspicious Hope. Hypatia 30 (3):597-612.
    Eve Sedgwick critiques paranoid methodologies for denying a plurality of affective approaches. Instead, she emphasizes affects such as hope, but her description of hope's openness does not address how hope can avoid discourses that appear to offer amelioration while deceptively masking subjugation. In this context, I will argue that suspicion in feminist political philosophy, as shown in the earlier work of Carole Pateman and Judith Butler, provides a cautious approach toward hope's openness without precluding hope altogether. This analysis (...)
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  41.  8
    Tatjana Schönwälder-Kuntze (2010). Zwischen Ansprache und Anspruch. Judith Butlers moraltheoretischer Entwurf. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 58 (1):83-104.
    The article focuses on three aspects of Judith Butler′s ethical deliberations: On the one hand it presents Butler′s tri-relational ethic′s model with its three moments – social norms, the speaking 'You′ and the addressed 'I′ – all depending on each other reciprocally. Butler states that ethical models theorizing subjectification which ignore the constitutive function of these three moments are at risk of being violent, because they make demands which cannot be met. On the other hand the article investigates the (...)
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  42.  11
    M. G. Weiss (2013). Non-Dualistic Sex. Josef Mitterer's Non-Dualistic Philosophy in the Light of Judith Butler's (De)Constructivist Feminism. Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):183-189.
    Context: Josef Mitterer has become known for criticizing the main exponents of analytic and constructivist philosophy for their blind adoption of a dualistic epistemology based on an alleged ontological difference between world and words. Judith Butler, who has developed an influential model of (de)constructivist feminism and has been labeled a linguistic constructivist, has been criticized for sustaining exactly what, according to Mitterer, most modern philosophy fails to acknowledge: namely that there is no ontological difference between objective facts beyond language (...)
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  43.  4
    Stacy Clifford Simplican (2015). Care, Disability, and Violence: Theorizing Complex Dependency in Eva Kittay and Judith Butler. Hypatia 30 (1):217-233.
    How do we theorize the experiences of caregivers abused by their children with autism without intensifying stigma toward disability? Eva Kittay emphasizes examples of extreme vulnerability to overturn myths of independence, but she ignores the possibility that dependents with disabilities may be vulnerable and aggressive. Instead, her work over-emphasizes caregivers' capabilities and the constancy of disabled dependents' vulnerability. I turn to Judith Butler's ethics and her conception of the self as opaque to rethink care amid conflict. Person-centered planning approaches, (...)
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  44.  6
    Sara Rushing (2010). Preparing for Politics: Judith Butler's Ethical Dispositions. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):284.
    The question of Judith Butler's ‘politics’ and their normative justification has been raised by critics and supporters alike for some time. The number of recent texts dedicated to this topic suggests that it remains an unresolved and still pressing question. I argue that in order to identify and evaluate the political implications of Butler's work, we must first recognize the relationship and distinction between four vectors of her thinking: her diagnosis of the human condition, her expression of specific normative (...)
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  45.  19
    Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.
  46.  6
    Kamila Stullerova (2014). The Knowledge of Suffering: On Judith Shklar|[Rsquo]|s |[Lsquo]|Putting Cruelty First|[Rsquo]|. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):23.
    Judith Shklar’s dictum, ‘the worst evil of cruelty’, is well known. What this means for her political theory and how such theory is construed are rarely explored. This article maintains that Shklar’s turn towards cruelty/suffering has a specific role in the development of her political argument. It allows her both to curb her long-standing skepticism, and to use it creatively. This is because suffering must be examined from the perspectives of history and philosophy, which produce two sets of knowledge, (...)
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  47.  4
    Katrina Forrester (2011). Hope and Memory in the Thought of Judith Shklar. Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):591-620.
    Current interpretations of the political theory of Judith Shklar focus to a disabling extent on her short, late article (1989); commentators take this late essay as representative of her work as a whole and thus characterize her as an anti-totalitarian, Cold War liberal. Other interpretations situate her political thought alongside followers of John Rawls and liberal political philosophy. Challenging the centrality of fear in Shklar's thought, this essay examines her writings on utopian and normative thought, the role of history (...)
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  48.  3
    V. Bell (1999). Mimesis as Cultural Survival: Judith Butler and Anti-Semitism. Theory, Culture and Society 16 (2):133-161.
    In this interview, Judith Butler speaks about her most recent work, especially Excitable Speech , in terms of how it represents a continuation of certain themes and how it represents moves into new terrains of debate. In particular, she addresses both possible critiques of her work, expecially around the issue of the possibility of political visions and the attention to speech when theorizing subjectification, and responds to questions around certain related themes such as: just what is the possibility of (...)
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  49.  4
    Anabella Di Tullio & Romina Smiraglia (2012). Debatiendo el papel de la reflexión feminista contemporánea: Judith Butler y Martha Nussbaum. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13:443-453.
    A partir del análisis crítico que Martha Nussbaum realizara sobre la obra de Judith Butler, proponemos examinar el vínculo entre la reflexión filosófica y la práctica política en el marco del feminismo. Para ello analizaremos el modo en que cada una de estas autoras reflexiona en torno al lenguaje, las identidades, el poder, la dominación y las formas de subvertirla.
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  50.  15
    Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.
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