Search results for 'Judith Rodin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Judith Rodin, Carmi Schooler & K. Warner Schaie (eds.) (1990). Self-Directedness: Cause and Effects Throughout the Life Course. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 240.0
    This book, the third in a series on the life course, has significance in today's world of research, professional practice, and public policy because it symbolizes the gradual reemergence of power in the social sciences. Focusing on "self-directedness and efficacy" over the life course, this text addresses the following issues: * the causes of change * how changes affect the individual, the family system, social groups, and society at large * how various disciplines--anthropology, sociology, psychology, epidemiology--approach this field of study, (...)
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  2. Judith Rodin (1990). Control by Any Other Name: Definitions, Concepts, and Processes. In Judith Rodin, Carmi Schooler & K. Warner Schaie (eds.), Self-Directedness: Cause and Effects Throughout the Life Course. L. Erlbaum Associates. 19--50.score: 240.0
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  3. Erica Haimes (1993). Women and the New Reproductive Technologies: Medical, Psychosocial, Legal and Ethical Dilemmas. Edited by Rodin Judith. & Collins Aila. Pp. 171. (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1991.) £22.50. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (2):283-284.score: 72.0
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  4. David Rodin (2004). War and Self-Defense. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (1):63–68.score: 60.0
    When is it right to go to war? The most persuasive answer to this question has always been 'in self-defense'. In a penetrating new analysis, bringing together moral philosophy, political science, and law, David Rodin shows what's wrong with this answer. He proposes a comprehensive new theory of the right of self-defense which resolves many of the perplexing questions that have dogged both jurists and moral philosophers. By applying the theory of self-defense to international relations, Rodin produces a (...)
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  5. David Rodin (2005). War and Self-Defense. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    When is it right to go to war? The most persuasive answer to this question has always been 'in self-defense'. In a penetrating new analysis, bringing together moral philosophy, political science, and law, David Rodin shows what's wrong with this answer. He proposes a comprehensive new theory of the right of self-defense which resolves many of the perplexing questions that have dogged both jurists and philosophers. -/- Winner of the American Philosophical Association Frank Chapman Sharp Memorial Prize.
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  6. Henry Shue & David Rodin (eds.) (2009). Preemption: Military Action and Moral Justification. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The dramatic declaration by U.S. President George W. Bush that, in light of the attacks on 9/11, the United States would henceforth be engaging in "preemption" against such enemies as terrorists armed with weapons of mass destruction forced a wide-open debate about justifiable uses of military force. Opponents saw the declaration as a direct challenge to the consensus, which has formed since the ratification of the Charter of the United Nations, that armed force may be used only in defense. Supporters (...)
     
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  7. David Rodin (2004). Terrorism Without Intention. Ethics 114 (4):752-771.score: 30.0
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  8. Andrei Rodin (2011). Categories Without Structures. Philosophia Mathematica 19 (1):20-46.score: 30.0
    The popular view according to which category theory provides a support for mathematical structuralism is erroneous. Category-theoretic foundations of mathematics require a different philosophy of mathematics. While structural mathematics studies ‘invariant form’ (Awodey) categorical mathematics studies covariant and contravariant transformations which, generally, have no invariants. In this paper I develop a non-structuralist interpretation of categorical mathematics.
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  9. A. C. Rietjens Judith, J. Der Maas Pauvanl, D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen Bregje, J. M. Delden Johannevans & Agnes van der Heide (2009). Two Decades of Research on Euthanasia From the Netherlands. What Have We Learnt and What Questions Remain? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3).score: 30.0
    Two decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to the regulating and public control of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. No slippery slope seems to have occurred. Physicians seem to adhere to the criteria for due care in the large majority of cases. Further, it has been shown (...)
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  10. Andrei Rodin (2010). How Mathematical Concepts Get Their Bodies. Topoi 29 (1):53-60.score: 30.0
    When the traditional distinction between a mathematical concept and a mathematical intuition is tested against examples taken from the real history of mathematics one can observe the following interesting phenomena. First, there are multiple examples where concepts and intuitions do not well fit together; some of these examples can be described as “poorly conceptualised intuitions” while some others can be described as “poorly intuited concepts”. Second, the historical development of mathematics involves two kinds of corresponding processes: poorly conceptualised intuitions are (...)
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  11. David Rodin & Michael Yudkin (2011). Academic Boycotts. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):465-485.score: 30.0
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  12. David Rodin (2006). The Ethics of War: State of the Art. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):241–246.score: 30.0
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  13. Andrei Rodin (2004). The Vessels and the Glue: Space, Time, and Causation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):633-634.score: 30.0
    In addition to the “universal glue,” which is the local mechanical causation, the standard explanatory scheme of classical science presumes two “universal vessels,” which are global space and time. I call this outdated metaphysical setting “black-and-white” because it allows for only two principal scales. A prospective metaphysics able to bind existing sciences together needs to be “colored,” that is, allow for scale relativity and diversification by domain.
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  14. David Rodin (2004). Beyond National Defense. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (1):93–98.score: 30.0
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  15. David Rodin (2006). Defending the Indefensible? Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):379–382.score: 30.0
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  16. David Rodin (2005). The Ownership Model of Business Ethics. Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):163-181.score: 30.0
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  17. Sánchez Flores & Mónica Judith (2005). Political Philosophy for the Global Age. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
    In a time of globalization, Political Philosophy for the Global Age provides a theoretical basis for the convergence of human values in terms of legitimate conceptions of time, language, and notions of self. Sánchez Flores reviews what she considers to be the most important positions in the current debate on political theory (liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and postcolonialism) and also proposes her own original contribution. Sánchez Flores’s unique approach is a critique of a type of morality formulated solely on the basis (...)
     
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  18. David Rodin (2010). Terrorism and Torture. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.score: 30.0
  19. David Rodin (ed.) (2007). War, Torture and Terrorism: Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.0
    This collection by leading scholars represents state of the art writings on the ethics of war. Many of the most important and contested controversies in modern war receive comprehensive discussion: the practice of torture, terrorism, assassination and targeted killing, the bombing of civilians in war, humanitarian intervention, and the invasion of Iraq Analytical introduction provides a guide to recent developments in the ethics of war An excellent overview for general readers interested in the current debate and controversies over the ethics (...)
     
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  20. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). Rodin on Self-Defense and the “Myth” of National Self-Defense: A Refutation. Philosophia 41 (4):1017-1036.score: 18.0
    David Rodin denies that defensive wars against unjust aggression can be justified if the unjust aggression limits itself, for example, to the annexation of territory, the robbery of resources or the restriction of political freedom, but would endanger the lives, bodily integrity or freedom from slavery of the citizens only if the unjustly attacked state (or someone else) actually resisted the aggression. I will argue that Rodin’s position is not correct. First, Rodin’s comments on the necessity condition (...)
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  21. Carolyn Culbertson (2013). The Ethics of Relationality: Judith Butler and Social Critique. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):449-463.score: 18.0
    This article takes up the work of Judith Butler in order to present a vision of ethics that avoids two common yet problematic positions: on the one hand, the skeptical position that ethical norms are so constitutive of who we are that they are ultimately impossible to assess and, on the other hand, the notion that we are justified in our commitment to any ethical norm that appears foundational to our identity. With particular attention to the trajectory of Butler’s (...)
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  22. Per Albert Ilsaas (2008). Blair on Rodin: Rejoinder. Res Publica 14 (4):313-316.score: 18.0
    The article is a brief response to Jacob Blair’s critique of David Rodin’s argument in War and Self-Defense that there are circumstances in which war conceivably could be justified not as self-defence, but as law enforcement or punishment. It argues that while Rodin’s position potentially is less dilemmatic than Blair suggests, Blair nevertheless usefully highlights tensions within it. Blair’s own argument in favour of ar as law-enforcement is suggestive, but in no way conclusive.
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  23. Shaun Young (2007). Avoiding the Unavoidable? Judith Shklar's Unwilling Search for an Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 13 (3):231-253.score: 18.0
    No less an authority than John Rawls identified Judith Shklar as a ‘political’ liberal. However, though their respective conceptions of political liberalism are similar in a number of important respects, Shklar emphasizes that her vision differs notably from that of Rawls. In particular, she explicitly eschews Rawls’s focus on establishing and sustaining an overlapping consensus, arguing that his belief in the possibility of securing such a consensus is naïve and, indeed, dangerous insofar as it embodies an obvious disregard for (...)
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  24. Amy Allen (2005). “Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection”. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that (...)
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  25. Marcel Stoetzler (2005). Subject Trouble: Judith Butler and Dialectics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (3):343-368.score: 12.0
    In this essay I explore the role of dialectics for how social theory can take account of the problem of structure and agency, or, determination and freedom, in a critical and emancipatory way. I discuss the limits and possibilities of dialectical, and of anti-dialectical, criticisms of Hegelian dialectics. For this purpose, I look at Judith Butler’s discussion of dialectics and the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ in her writings between 1987 ( Subjects of Desire ; republished 1999) and 1990 (...)
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  26. E. Ferrarese (2011). Judith Butler's 'Not Particularly Postmodern Insight' of Recognition. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):759-773.score: 12.0
    Although Judith Butler regards recognition as the theme unifying her work, one finds a striking absence of dialogue between her and the authors of the normative theories of recognition – Honneth, Habermas, Ricoeur, etc. In the present article I seek to call into question this sentiment, shared by the two sides, of a radical theoretical heterogeneity. First I seek to show that the theory of performativity which Butler developed initially, contrary to all expectations, sets her relatively apart from the (...)
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  27. Alison Stone (2005). Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within (...)
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  28. K. Forrester (2012). Judith Shklar, Bernard Williams and Political Realism. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):247-272.score: 12.0
    In light of recent interest among political theorists in the idea of political realism, Judith Shklar’s liberalism of fear has come to be associated with anti-Rawlsian thought. This paper seeks to show that, on the contrary, Shklar’s specific formulation of political realism, unlike more recent variations, was not motivated by a critique of Rawls. This paper will address three concerns: first, it will show what exactly Shklar’s initial realism was responding to; second, it will consider the implications of this (...)
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  29. Sara Salih (2002). Judith Butler. Routledge.score: 12.0
    A welcome addition to the Routledge Critical Thinkers series, Judith Butler is the first guidebook on this renowned feminist and queer theory scholar, which will help not only students of literary criticism but also students of law, sociology, philosophy, film and cultural studies. Examining Butler's work through a variety of contexts, including the formation of gender performativity, identity and subjecthood, Sarah Salih address Butler's crucial ideas on the gender agenda, the body, pornography, race, gay self-expression and power and psychoanalysis. (...)
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  30. Kathleen Dow Magnus (2006). The Unaccountable Subject: Judith Butler and the Social Conditions of Intersubjective Agency. Hypatia 21 (2):81-103.score: 12.0
    : Judith Butler's Kritik der ethischen Gewalt represents a significant refinement of her position on the relationship between the construction of the subject and her social subjection. While Butler's earlier texts reflect a somewhat restricted notion of agency, her Adorno Lectures formulate a notion of agency that extends beyond mere resistance. This essay traces the development of Butler's account of agency and evaluates it in light of feminist projects of social transformation.
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  31. Christa Hodapp (2013). Giving an Account of Oneself by Judith Butler (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):115-118.score: 12.0
    The chapters of Judith Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself originally were given as the Spinoza Lectures for the Department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam in the spring of 2002. In this work, Butler returns to the problem of subjectivity and subject formation, but this time in the context of ethics and ethical philosophy. Pulling together ethical considerations and theories of the self from authors including Nietzsche, Foucault, Adorno, and Levinas, Butler deftly and successfully decenters and refocuses (...)
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  32. Joris Vlieghe (2010). Judith Butler and the Public Dimension of the Body: Education, Critique and Corporeal Vulnerability. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):153-170.score: 12.0
    In this paper I discuss some thoughts Judith Butler presents regarding corporeal vulnerability. This might help to elucidate the problem of whether critical education is still possible today. I first explain why precisely the possibility of critique within education is a problem for us today. This is because the traditional means of enhancing a critical attitude in pupils, stimulating their self-reflective capacities, contributes to the continued existence and strengthening of the current societal and political regime. A way out of (...)
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  33. Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.) (2008). Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler has been arguably the most important gender theorist of the past twenty years. This edited volume draws leading international political theorists into dialogue with her political theory. Each chapter is written by an acclaimed political theorist and concentrates on a particular aspect of Butler's work. The book is divided into five sections which reflect the interdisciplinary nature of Butler's work and activism: Butler and Philosophy: explores Butler’s unique relationship to the discipline of philosophy, considering her work in (...)
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  34. Noela Davis (2012). Subjected Subjects? On Judith Butler's Paradox of Interpellation. Hypatia 27 (3):881 - 897.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's theory of the constitution of subjectivity conceptualizes the subject as a performative materialization of its social environment. In her theory Butler utilizes Louis Althusser's notion of interpellation, and she critiques the constitutive paradoxes to which its tautological framing leads. Although there is no pre-existing subject, as it is constituted in the turn to the interpellative hail, Butler nonetheless theorizes a guilt and compulsion acting on an “individual” that compels his or her turn to answer the hail. There (...)
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  35. James Stanescu (2012). Species Trouble: Judith Butler, Mourning, and the Precarious Lives of Animals. Hypatia 27 (3):567-582.score: 12.0
    This article utilizes the work of Judith Butler in order to chart a queer and feminist animal studies, an animal studies that celebrates our shared embodied finitude. Butler's commentary on other animals remains dispersed and fragmented throughout books, lectures, and interviews over the course of the last several years. This work is critically synthesized in conjunction with her work on mourning and precarious lives. By developing an anti-anthropocentric understanding of mourning and precarious lives, this article hopes to create ontological, (...)
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  36. Elena Loizidou (2007). Judith Butler: Ethics, Law, Politics. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 12.0
    The first to use Judith Butlers work as a reading of how the legal subject is formed, this book traces how Butler comes to the themes of ethics, law and ...
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  37. Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.score: 12.0
  38. Judith Felson Duchan (2000). Janet W. Astington, Paul L. Harris and David R. Olson, Eds., Developing Theories of Mind; Henry M. Wellman, the Child's Theory of Mind; Douglas Frye and Chris Moore, Eds., Children's Theories of Mind: Mental States and Social Understanding Judith Felson Duchan. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10 (2):277-288.score: 12.0
  39. Judith Butler, Drucilla Cornell, Pheng Cheah & E. A. Grosz (1998). The Future of Sexual Difference: An Interview with Judith Butler and Drucilla Cornell. Diacritics 28 (1):19-42.score: 12.0
  40. C. Leah Devlin & P. J. Capelotti (1996). Proximity to Seacoast: G. W. Field and the Marine Laboratory at Point Judith Pond, Rhode Island, 1896-1900. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 29 (2):251 - 265.score: 12.0
    By the time George Wilton Field concluded his work at the marine laboratory his initial scientific concerns had forced him directly into local politics. He pleaded with little success with the community of South Kingstown, and with no success with the town of Narragansett, to create and maintain a permanent breach:Is it not possible for the acute business sense and the broad philanthropy of the community to sweep aside petty, local, and personal jealousies which are now blocking practical progress for (...)
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  41. Judith Baker (1993). The Faces of Injustice Judith N. Shklar New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1990, Vii + 144 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 32 (01):197-.score: 12.0
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  42. M. G. Weiss (2013). Non-Dualistic Sex. Josef Mitterer's Non-Dualistic Philosophy in the Light of Judith Butler's (De)Constructivist Feminism. Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):183-189.score: 12.0
    Context: Josef Mitterer has become known for criticizing the main exponents of analytic and constructivist philosophy for their blind adoption of a dualistic epistemology based on an alleged ontological difference between world and words. Judith Butler, who has developed an influential model of (de)constructivist feminism and has been labeled a linguistic constructivist, has been criticized for sustaining exactly what, according to Mitterer, most modern philosophy fails to acknowledge: namely that there is no ontological difference between objective facts beyond language (...)
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  43. Kathy Dow Magnus (2006). The Unaccountable Subject: Judith Butler and the Social Conditions of Intersubjective Agency. Hypatia 21 (2):81 - 103.score: 12.0
    Judith Butler's Kritik der ethischen Gewalt represents a significant refinement of her position on the relationship between the construction of the subject and her social subjection. While Butler's earlier texts reflect a somewhat restricted notion of agency, her Adorno Lectures formulate a notion of agency that extends beyond mere resistance. This essay traces the development of Butler's account of agency and evaluates it in light of feminist projects of social transformation.
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  44. Tom Boland (2007). Critique as a Technique of Self: A Butlerian Analysis of Judith Butler's Prefaces. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):105-122.score: 12.0
    This article considers `critique' as performative, being on the one hand a reiterative performance, that enacts the `critic' through the act of critique, and on the other hand reflecting the constitution of the subject. While this approach takes on the conceptual framework of Judith Butler's work, it differs by refusing critique — or its correlates; parody, subversion or similar — any special status. Like any other performance critique is taken here as a cultural practice, as a Foucauldian `technique of (...)
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  45. David W. McIvor (2012). Bringing Ourselves to Grief: Judith Butler and the Politics of Mourning. Political Theory 40 (4):409 - 436.score: 12.0
    Within political theory there has been a recent surge of interest in the themes of loss, grief, and mourning. In this paper i address questions about the politics of mourning through a critical engagement of the work of Judith Butler. I argue that Butler's work remains tethered to an account of melancholic subjectivity derived from her early reading of Freud. These investments in melancholia compromise Butler's recent ethico-political interventions by obscuring the ambivalence of political engagements and the possibilities of (...)
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  46. Judith Butler & William E. Connolly (2000). Politics, Power and Ethics: A Discussion Between Judith Butler and William Connolly. Theory and Event 4 (2).score: 12.0
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  47. Greg Seals (2007). Classroom Authority: Theory, Research, and Practice. Judith L. Pace and Annette Hemmings, Eds. Mahwah, NJ.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 2006. Pp. 193 $24.50 (Paper). [REVIEW] Educational Studies 41 (3):259-263.score: 12.0
    (2007). Classroom Authority: Theory, Research, and Practice. Judith L. Pace and Annette Hemmings, eds. Mahwah, NJ.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 2006. pp. 193 $24.50 (paper). Educational Studies: Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. 259-263.
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  48. Judith Boss, Giordano Bruno, Vere Chappell, John Cottingham, Peter A. Danielson, Rene Descartes, Thomas Douglas, John Finis, R. J. Hollingdale & Vittorio Hösle (1999). Boss, Judith and James M. Nuzum. Teaching Philosophy 22 (2):237.score: 12.0
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  49. Judith Butler & Bronwyn Davies (eds.) (2007). Judith Butler in Conversation: Analyzing the Texts and Talk of Everyday Life. Routledge.score: 12.0
     
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  50. Céline Coussy (2010). Le Retour de Judith à Béthulie de Botticelli. Clio 2:181-194.score: 12.0
    Sandro Botticelli a choisi de peindre, au début de sa carrière, un épisode de l’Ancien Testament, mettant en scène une femme à la fois très populaire au Moyen Âge et à Florence : Judith. Cet épisode de l’Ancien Testament narre la résistance de la ville juive de Béthulie face au général assyrien, Holopherne. Une belle veuve de Béthulie, Judith, décide de se rendre dans le camp ennemi. La jeune femme, avec l’aide de sa servante, Abra, se pare de (...)
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