Search results for 'Judy Attfield' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Judy Attfield (ed.) (1999). Utility Reassessed: The Role of Ethics in the Practice of Design. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.score: 120.0
    This sparkling collection of essays both defines and reassesses the concept of Utility. Using it as a touchstone for the consideration of the place of ethics in the recent history of design, the collection offers a way into the issues which concern design decision-makers today. It offers previously unpublished research into diverse topics such as the investigation into the hitherto undiscovered designs for a utility vehicle, and it reveals a fresh perspective on the philosophy behind the concept of Utility as (...)
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  2. Robin Attfield (2001). To Do No Harm? The Precautionary Principle and Moral Values. Philosophy of Management 1 (3):11-20.score: 60.0
    From over 2000 years ago the ideal expressed in the Hippocratic Oath has encouraged doctors never knowingly to do harm: primum non nocere. Over 25 years ago the management writer Peter Drucker proposed it as the basis of a management ethic, ‘the right rule for the ethics managers need, the ethics of responsibility’. He argued then that the rule had wide scope encompassing for instance executive compensation, management rhetoric and the management of business impacts. In 2000 the United Nations Global (...)
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  3. Robin Attfield (1998). Environmental Ethics and Intergenerational Equity. Inquiry 41 (2):207 – 222.score: 30.0
    Possible environmental and related impacts of human activity are shown to include the extinction of humanity and other sentient species, excessive human numbers, and a deteriorating quality of life (I). I proceed to argue that neither future rights, nor Kantian respect for future people's autonomy, nor a contract between the generations supplies a plausible basis of obligations with regard to future generations. Obligations concern rather promoting the well-being of the members of future generations, whoever they may be, as well as (...)
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  4. Robin Attfield (1981). The Good of Trees. Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (1):35-54.score: 30.0
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  5. Robin Attfield (2010). Darwin's Doubt, Non-Deterministic Darwinism and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Philosophy 85 (4):465-483.score: 30.0
    Alvin Plantinga, echoing a worry of Charles Darwin which he calls 'Darwin's doubt', argues that given Darwinian evolutionary theory our beliefs are unreliable, since they are determined to be what they are by evolutionary pressures and could have had no other content. This papers surveys in turn deterministic and non-deterministic interpretations of Darwinism, and concludes that Plantinga's argument poses a problem for the former alone and not for the latter. Some parallel problems arise for the Cognitive Science of Religion, and (...)
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  6. Robin Attfield (2009). Mediated Responsibilities, Global Warming, and the Scope of Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):225-236.score: 30.0
  7. Robin Attfield (2005). Biocentric Consequentialism and Value-Pluralism: A Response to Alan Carter. Utilitas 17 (1):85-92.score: 30.0
    My theory of biocentric consequentialism is first shown not to be significantly inegalitarian, despite not advocating treating all creatures equally. I then respond to Carter's objections concerning population, species extinctions, the supposed minimax implication, endangered interests, autonomy and thought-experiments. Biocentric consequentialism is capable of supporting a sustainable human population at a level compatible with preserving most non-human species, as opposed to catastrophic population increases or catastrophic decimation. Nor is it undermined by the mere conceivable possibility of counter-intuitive implications. While Carter (...)
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  8. Robin Attfield (2006). The Shape of a Global Ethic. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (1):5-19.score: 30.0
    A global ethic needs to be cosmopolitan in a sense which is explained; this excludes certain kinds of communitarian ethic. Contracttheories, Kantianism, basic-rights theories, Ross-type deontology and theories of virtue ethics are reviewed and found to encounter severe problems. Consequentialist theories, however, are found capable of coping with Williams’ objections, and practice-consequentialist theories capable of coping with right-making practices and with Lenman's unpredictability objection. Variants that exclude from consideration unintended consequences, the results of omissions, or impacts on possible people, or (...)
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  9. Robin Attfield (1988). Francis Bacon and Modernity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):665-667.score: 30.0
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  10. Robin Attfield (2009). Reviews What is Biodiversity by James Maclaurin and Kim Sterelny University of Chicago Press, 2008. £31/£12.50. Philosophy 84 (4):605-609.score: 30.0
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  11. Robin Attfield (1979). Supererogation and Double Standards. Mind 88 (352):481-499.score: 30.0
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  12. Robin Attfield (2011). Nolt, Future Harm and Future Quality of Life. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):11-13.score: 30.0
  13. Robin Attfield (2010). Ecological Issues of Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):147-154.score: 30.0
    In the first part of this article the author explores the implications for justice of the wider range of parties holding moral standing that environmental ethics has recently disclosed. These implications concern the equitable treatment of future generations and nonhuman creatures, and are relevant both to policies, such as approaches to global warming, and procedures, which may need to be revised to give an equitable voice to unrepresented interests. Later the author considers some radical implications of regarding humanity as stewards (...)
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  14. Robin Attfield (2011). Schmidtz on Species Egalitarianism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):139 - 141.score: 30.0
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 139-141, June 2011.
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  15. Robin Attfield (2004). Rousseau, Clarke, Butler and Critiques of Deism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):429 – 443.score: 30.0
    Rousseau’s stance on natural religion, revealed religion and their relation are outlined (section 1), and then his agreements and disagreements with Samuel Clarke (section 2). After a survey of Joseph Butler's critique of deism (section 3), Rousseau’s arguments emerge as capable of supplying a counter-critique sufficient to show that deism could claim to have survived the eighteenth-century undefeated (section 4). If the attempted refutation of theistic arguments on the parts of David Hume and of Immanuel Kant was inconclusive (section 5), (...)
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  16. Robin Attfield (2011). Beyond Anthropocentrism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:29-46.score: 30.0
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  17. Robin Attfield & Barry Wilkins (eds.) (1992). International Justice and the Third World: Studies in the Philosophy of Development. Routledge.score: 30.0
    International Justice and the Third World examines the conceptual and ethical issues surrounding the idea of development. The contributors forcefully contest the view that there is no such thing as justice beween societies of unequal power, and no obligation to assist poor people in distant countries. While attentive to and explicatory of the presuppositions adhering to development models, Liberal and Marxist approaches to universal responsibilities are forwarded and these approaches' ability to manage global issues of equity are weighed.
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  18. Robin Attfield (1979). How Not to Be a Moral Relativist. The Monist 62 (4):510-523.score: 30.0
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  19. Robin Attfield (1990). Deep Ecology and Intrinsic Value. Cogito 4 (1):61-66.score: 30.0
  20. Robin Attfield (2007). Is the Concept of Nature Dispensable? The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 5 (25):59-63.score: 30.0
    In response to the arguments of Bill McKibben and of Stephen Vogel that nature is at an end and that the very concept of nature should be discarded, I argue that, far from this being the case, the concept of nature is indispensable. A third sense of 'nature' besides the two distinguished by Vogel, that of the nature of an organism, is brought to attention and shown, through five arguments, to be indispensable for environmental philosophy and ethics, and for ethics (...)
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  21. Robin Attfield (2003). Biocentric Consequentialism, Pluralism, and 'The Minimax Implication': A Reply to Alan Carter. Utilitas 15 (01):76-.score: 30.0
    Alan Carter's recent review in Mind of my Ethics of the Global Environment combines praise of biocentric consequentialism (as presented there and in Value, Obligation and Meta-Ethics) with criticisms that it could advocate both minimal satisfaction of human needs and the extinction of for the sake of generating extra people; Carter also maintains that as a monistic theory it is predictably inadequate to cover the full range of ethical issues, since only a pluralistic theory has this capacity. In this reply, (...)
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  22. Robin Attfield (1974). On Being Human. Inquiry 17 (1-4):175 – 192.score: 30.0
    After a clarification of the concept of concept the project of analysing the concept of man is defended (I), and it is concluded that to be human involves being both of a certain anatomical structure and a member of a race most of whose members are capable of theoretical and practical reasoning (II). Since further the development of essential capacities is necessary for members of a species to flourish, the ability to exercise the essential human capacities for theoretical and practical (...)
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  23. Robin Attfield (2000). Evolution, Theodicy and Value. Heythrop Journal 41 (3):281–296.score: 30.0
  24. Robin Attfield (2009). Non-Reciprocal Responsibilities and the Banquet of the Kingdom. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):33 – 42.score: 30.0
    Granted the far-flung impacts of humanity on the future and the biosphere, Hans Jonas has rightly called for our responsibilities to be reconceptualised, and where responsibilities are non-reciprocal Chris Groves has put forward a model of the ethics of care to underpin them. In view, however, of Derek Parfit's work on responsibilities with regard to the possible but unidentifiable people of alternative possible futures, the author suggests that an ethical model grounded in relations, while helpful, is insufficient with regard to (...)
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  25. R. Attfield (1970). Berkeley and Imagination. Philosophy 45 (173):237 - 239.score: 30.0
  26. Robin Attfield (1984). Value in the Wilderness. Metaphilosophy 15 (3-4):289-304.score: 30.0
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  27. David G. Attfield (1978). Motivation in Moral Education: The Case for Virtue. Journal of Moral Education 7 (3):158-165.score: 30.0
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  28. Robin Attfield (2001). Postmodernism, Value and Objectivity. Environmental Values 10 (2):145 - 162.score: 30.0
    The first half of this paper replies to three postmodernist challenges to belief in objective intrinsic value. One lies in the claim that the language of objective value presupposes a flawed, dualistic distinction between subjects and objects. The second lies in the claim that there are no objective values which do not arise within and/or depend upon particular cultures or valuational frameworks. The third comprises the suggestion that belief in objective values embodies the representational theory of perception. In the second (...)
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  29. Robin Attfield (1990). Ethics and Environmental Responsibility. Philosophical Books 31 (3):172-173.score: 30.0
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  30. Robin Attfield (1989). Holmes Rolston, III: Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 11 (4):363-368.score: 30.0
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  31. Robin Attfield (2012). Synthetic Biology, Deontology and Synthetic Bioethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):29 - 32.score: 30.0
    Paul Thompson argues that current synthetic biology amounts to synthetic genomics, comprising a ?platform? technology, and that Christopher Preston's deontological objections based on its supposed rejection of the historical process of evolution miscarry. This makes it surprising that Thompson's normative ethic consists in a deontological appeal to Kantian duties of imperfect obligation. Construed as obligations subject to choice, such constraints risk being excessively malleable where the ethical objections to deployment of this technology concern land rights and/or exploitation. Thompson's advocacy of (...)
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  32. Robin Attfield & Michael Durrant (1973). The Irreducibility of `Meaning'. Noûs 7 (3):282-298.score: 30.0
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  33. Robin Attfield (2001). Are Promises to Repay International Debt Binding? Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):505–511.score: 30.0
  34. Robin Attfield (1983). Miller, Kripke, Bach and the Meaning of Proper Names. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):153-158.score: 30.0
    Examples are presented which raise problems for theories of proper names which deny their equivalence either with descriptions (miller, Kripke) or with non-Trivial descriptions (bach). These examples of names equivalent to the same descriptions for all the possible worlds in which their bearers exist require the theories to be abandoned or at least modified as to their scope.
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  35. Robin Attfield (2011). Cultural Evolution, Sperber, Memes and Religion. Philosophical Inquiry 35 (3-4):36-55.score: 30.0
    Cultural transmission in non-literate societies (including that of Homer) is first discussed, partly to test some theories of Dan Sperber, and partly to consider thetheory of memes, which is sometimes held applicable to Homeric formulae, and is considered next. After discussing Sperber's criticism of memeticism, I turn toSperber's susceptibility theory of culture, and his discussions of religion and of music. Further examples drawn from Homeric religion are found to be in tension with aspects of this theory. Two diverse interpretations of (...)
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  36. Robin Attfield (2005). In Defense of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):335-336.score: 30.0
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  37. R. Attfield (1982). Optimific, Right, but Not Obligatory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):317 - 320.score: 30.0
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  38. Robin Attfield (1975). Toward a Defence of Teleology. Ethics 85 (2):123-135.score: 30.0
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  39. Robin Attfield (1986). Understanding Social Science: A Philosophical Introduction to the Social Sciences By Roger Trigg Oxford and New York: Basil Blackwell, 1985, 24 Pp., £5.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy 61 (238):544-.score: 30.0
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  40. Robin Attfield (1977). Clarke, Collins and Compounds. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (1):45-54.score: 30.0
    Can room be found in between the matter and void of a Newtonian universe for an immaterial and immortal soul? Can followers of Locke with his agnosticism about the nature of substances claim to know that some of them are immaterial? Samuel Clarke, well versed in Locke's thought and a defender both of Newtonian science and Christian orthodoxy, believed he could do both and attempted to prove his case by means of some hard-boiled reductionism. Anthony Collins, a deist whose only (...)
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  41. David Attfield (1978). Is Religious Education Possible? A Reply to Roger Marples. Journal of Philosophy of Education 12 (1):93–97.score: 30.0
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  42. Robin Attfield (1995). John Laird Andthe Idea of Value. Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (1):103-114.score: 30.0
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  43. David G. Attfield (1978). Problems with Virtues. Journal of Moral Education 7 (2):75-80.score: 30.0
    Abstract Four problems in the teaching of virtues are discussed. 1. Which virtues to teach is to be decided by distinguishing moral from natural virtues and by choosing the former. 2. Indoctrination is avoided by inculcating only non?controversial virtues, the ones that reflect moral rules as distinct from those reflecting individual ideals. 3. It is conceded that single?track virtues presuppose rules and are therefore inessential in moral education but this objection does not hold for multi?track virtues. 4. Single track virtues (...)
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  44. Robin Attfield (1980). Religious Symbols and the Voyage of Analogy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):225 - 238.score: 30.0
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  45. Robin Attfield (2007). Sustainable Development Revisited. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-189.score: 30.0
    My aim is to defend the concept of sustainable development both against economists' interpretations that make it involve perpetual gains to human well-being, and against sceptical accounts that make its meaning vary from speaker to speaker, serving as a cloak for the status quo and the suggestion that it be discarded. The assumptions of the economists' interpretation are questioned, and the centrality among early advocates of sustainable development of sustainable practices and of sustainability being social and ecological as well as (...)
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  46. Robin Attfield (2011). Sober, Environmentalists, Species, and Ignorance. Environmental Ethics 33 (3):307-316.score: 30.0
    In an influential paper, Elliott Sober raises philosophical problems for environmentalism, and proposes a basis for being an environmentalist without discarding familiar, traditional ethical theories, a basis consisting in the aesthetic value of nature and natural entities. Two of his themes are problematic. One is his objection to arguments from the unknown value of endangered species, which he designates “the argument from ignorance,” but which should instead be understood as arguments from probability. The other concerns his attempt to avoid holistic (...)
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  47. Simon Attfield & Ann Blandford (2010). Discovery-Led Refinement in E-Discovery Investigations: Sensemaking, Cognitive Ergonomics and System Design. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):387-412.score: 30.0
    Given the very large numbers of documents involved in e-discovery investigations, lawyers face a considerable challenge of collaborative sensemaking. We report findings from three workplace studies which looked at different aspects of how this challenge was met. From a sociotechnical perspective, the studies aimed to understand how investigators collectively and individually worked with information to support sensemaking and decision making. Here, we focus on discovery-led refinement; specifically, how engaging with the materials of the investigations led to discoveries that supported refinement (...)
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  48. Robin Attfield (2007). Beyond the Earth Charter. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):359-367.score: 30.0
    The Earth Charter is largely a wholesome embodiment of a commendable and globally applicable ecological ethic. But it fails to treat responsibilities towardfuture generations with sufficient clarity, presenting these generations as comparable to present and past generations, whose members are identifiable, whenin fact most future people are of unknown identity, and when the very existence of most of them depends on current actions. It can be claimed that we still haveobligations with regard to whoever there will be whom we could (...)
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  49. Robin Attfield (1993). Clarke, Independence and Necessity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (2):67 – 82.score: 30.0
  50. Robin Attfield (1999). Depth, Trusteeship, and Redistribution. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:159-168.score: 30.0
    I review some themes of Naess’s “The Shallow and the Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movements” article and Routley’s “Is there a Need for a New, An Environmental Ethic?” presentation at the 1973 World Congress. Naess’s affiliation to the Deep Ecology Movement deserves acclaim, theoretic entanglements notwithstanding. Routley advocated a new ethic because no Judaeo-Christian ethical tradition could cope with widespread environmental intuitions. However, the ethical tradition of stewardship can satisfy such concerns. It is compatible with environmental values, need not be managerial, (...)
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