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  1. Daniel Mendelsohn, Charles S. Haw & Judy Illes (2014). Convergent Expert Views on Decision-Making for Decompressive Craniectomy in Malignant MCA Syndrome. Neuroethics 7 (3):365-372.
    Background and PurposeThe decision to perform decompressive craniectomy for patients with malignant MCA syndrome can be ethically complex. We investigated factors that clinicians consider in this decision-making process.MethodsA survey including clinical vignettes and attitudes questions surrounding the use of hemicraniectomy in malignant MCA syndrome was distributed to 203 neurosurgeons, neurologists, staff and residents, and nurses and allied health members specializing in the care of neurological patients. These were practicing health care providers situated in an urban setting in Canada where access (...)
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  2. Emily Borgelt, James A. Anderson & Judy Illes (2013). Managing Incidental Findings: Lessons From Neuroimaging. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):46 - 47.
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  3. Shaun Stevenson, B. L. Beattie, Richard Vedan, Emily Dwosh, Lindsey Bruce & Judy Illes (2013). Neuroethics, Confidentiality, and a Cultural Imperative in Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: A Case Study with a First Nation Population. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):15.
    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society’s immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics provides (...)
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  4. Emily Borgelt, Daniel Buchman & Judy Illes (2012). Practicioners' Views on Neuroimaging : Mental Health, Patient Consent, and Choice. In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. Nina di Pietro, Louise Whiteley & Judy Illes (2012). Treatments and Services for Neurodevelopmental Disorders on Advocacy Websites: Information or Evaluation? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):197-209.
    The Internet has quickly gained popularity as a major source of health-related information, but its impact is unclear. Here, we investigate the extent to which advocacy websites for three neurodevelopmental disorders—cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)—inform stakeholders about treatment options, and discuss the ethical challenges inherent in providing such information online. We identified major advocacy websites for each disorder and assessed website accountability, the number, attributes, and accessibility of treatments described, and the valence (...)
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  6. Emily Borgelt, Daniel Buchman & Judy Illes (2011). Erratum: “ This is Why You've Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):107-107.
    Erratum: “ This is Why you’ve Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care Content Type Journal Article Pages 107-107 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9284-4 Authors Emily Borgelt, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Daniel Z. Buchman, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Judy Illes, National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume (...)
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  7. Daniel Buchman, Judy Illes & Peter Reiner (2011). The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience. Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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  8. Julie Robillard, Carole Federico, Kate Tairyan, Adrian Ivinson & Judy Illes (2011). Untapped Ethical Resources for Neurodegeneration Research. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):9-.
    Background: The research community has a mandate to discover effective treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. The ethics landscape surrounding this mandate is in a constant state of flux, and ongoing challenges place ever greater demands on investigators to be accountable to the public and to answer questions about the implications of their work for health care, society, and policy. Methods: We surveyed US-based investigators involved in neurodegenerative diseases research about how they value ethics-related issues, what motivates them to give consideration to (...)
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  9. Joanne Reimer, Emily Borgelt & Judy Illes (2010). In Pursuit of “Informed Hope” in the Stem Cell Discourse. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):31-32.
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  10. Jocelyn Grunwell, Judy Illes & Katrina Karkazis (2009). Advancing Neuroregenerative Medicine: A Call for Expanded Collaboration Between Scientists and Ethicists. Neuroethics 2 (1):13-20.
    To date, ethics discussions about stem cell research overwhelmingly have centered on the morality and acceptability of using human embryonic stem cells. Governments in many jurisdictions have now answered these “first-level questions” and many have now begun to address ethical issues related to the donation of cells, gametes, or embryos for research. In this commentary, we move beyond these ethical concerns to discuss new themes that scientists on the forefront of NRM development anticipate, providing a preliminary framework for further discussion (...)
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  11. Judy Illes (2009). Neurologisms. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):1-1.
  12. Patricia Lau & Judy Illes (2009). The Gray Zones of Privatized Imaging. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (4):21-22.
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  13. Sofia Lombera & Judy Illes (2009). The International Dimensions of Neuroethics. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):57-64.
    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International Monetary Fund (IMF) (...)
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  14. Joseph J. Fins & Judy Illes (2008). Lights, Camera, Inaction? Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):W1 – W3.
  15. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  16. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Participants of the Working Meeting on Ethics, Neuroimaging and Limited States of Consciousness. Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. Am J Bioethics 8 (9):3-12.
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  17. Judy Illes & Vivian Nora Chin (2008). Bridging Philosophical and Practical Implications of Incidental Findings in Brain Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):298-304.
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  18. Eric Racine & Judy Illes (2008). Neuroethics. In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. 495--503.
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  19. Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2008). Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
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  20. Judy Illes (2007). Ipsa Scientia Potestas Est (Knowledge is Power). American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):1 – 2.
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  21. Judy Illes (2007). Not Forgetting Forgetting. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):1 – 2.
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  22. Judy Illes & Emily R. Murphy (2007). Chimeras of Nurture. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):1 – 2.
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  23. Judy Illes & Eric Racine (2007). Guest Editorial: Neuroethics—From Neurotechnology to Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):125-128.
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  24. Eric Racine, Hz Adriaan van Der Loos & Judy Illes (2007). Internet Marketing of Neuroproducts: New Practices and Healthcare Policy Challenges. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):181-194.
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  25. Eric Racine, Sarah Waldman, Nicole Palmour, David Risse & Judy Illes (2007). “Currents of Hope”: Neurostimulation Techniques in U.S. And U.K. Print Media. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):312-316.
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  26. Judy Illes, Raymond de Vries, Mildred Cho & Pam Schraedley-Desmond (2006). ELSI Priorities for Brain Imaging. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W24-W31.
    As one of the most compelling technologies for imaging the brain, functional MRI (fMRI) produces measurements and persuasive pictures of research subjects making cognitive judgments and even reasoning through difficult moral decisions. Even after centuries of studying the link between brain and behavior, this capability presents a number of novel significant questions. For example, what are the implications of biologizing human experience? How might neuroimaging disrupt the mysteries of human nature, spirituality, and personal identity? Rather than waiting for an ethical (...)
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  27. Judy Illes (ed.) (2005). Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. OUP Oxford.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our behavior and lose our free will? Should certain brain scan studies be disallowed on the basis of moral grounds? Why is the media so interested in (...)
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  28. Judy Illes, Eric Racine & Kirschen & P. Matthew (2005). A Picture is Worth 1000 Words, but Which 1000? In , Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oup Oxford.
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  29. Judy Illes & Eric Racine (2005). Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty of (...)
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