Search results for 'Julia Epstein' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Julia Epstein (1994). Unbecoming Women: British Women Writers and the Novel of Development (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):147-148.score: 240.0
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  2. Rl Epstein (1987). ASH, CJ, Categoricity in Hyperarithmetical Degrees (1) BALDWIN, JT and HARRINGTON, L., Trivial Pursuit: Re-Marks on the Main Gap (3) COOPER, SB and EPSTEIN, RL, Complementing Below Re-Cursively Enumerable Degrees (1). [REVIEW] Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 34:311.score: 180.0
     
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  3. Spring Epstein (1987). Edwin M. Epstein. The Corporate Social Policy Process: Beyond Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Corporate Social Responsiveness, California Management Review 29:99-114.score: 180.0
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  4. L. W. Roberts, J. Battaglia, M. Smithpeter & R. S. Epstein (2000). Health Care on Main Street-Laura Weiss Roberts, John Battaglia, Margaret Smithpeter, and Richard S. Epstein Reply. Hastings Center Report 30 (3):5-6.score: 180.0
     
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  5. Brian Epstein (2015). The Ant Trap: Rebuilding the Foundations of the Social Sciences. Oxford.score: 60.0
    We live in a world of crowds and corporations, artworks and artifacts, legislatures and languages, money and markets. These are all social objects — they are made, at least in part, by people and by communities. But what exactly are these things? How are they made, and what is the role of people in making them? In The Ant Trap, Brian Epstein rewrites our understanding of the nature of the social world and the foundations of the social sciences. (...) explains and challenges the three prevailing traditions about how the social world is made. One tradition takes the social world to be built out of people, much as traffic is built out of cars. A second tradition also takes people to be the building blocks of the social world, but focuses on thoughts and attitudes we have toward one another. And a third tradition takes the social world to be a collective projection onto the physical world. Epstein shows that these share critical flaws. Most fundamentally, all three traditions overestimate the role of people in building the social world: they are overly anthropocentric. Epstein starts from scratch, bringing the resources of contemporary metaphysics to bear. In the place of traditional theories, he introduces a model based on a new distinction between the grounds and the anchors of social facts. Epstein illustrates the model with a study of the nature of law, and shows how to interpret the prevailing traditions about the social world. Then he turns to social groups, and to what it means for a group to take an action or have an intention. Contrary to the overwhelming consensus, these often depend on more than the actions and intentions of group members. (shrink)
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  6. Gita Martohardjono, Samuel David Epstein & Suzanne Flynn (1998). Universal Grammar: Hypothesis Space or Grammar Selection Procedures? Is UG Affected by Critical Periods? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):612-614.score: 60.0
    Universal Grammar (UG) can be interpreted as a constraint on the form of possible grammars (hypothesis space) or as a constraint on acquisition strategies (selection procedures). In this response to Herschensohn we reiterate the position outlined in Epstein et al. (1996a, r), that in the evaluation of L2 acquisition as a UG- constrained process the former (possible grammars/ knowledge states) is critical, not the latter. Selection procedures, on the other hand, are important in that they may have a bearing (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Epstein (2012). Anne O'Byrne: Natality and Finitude. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):153-159.score: 60.0
    Anne O’Byrne: Natality and finitude Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11007-011-9203-8 Authors Jeffrey Epstein, SUNY Stony Brook, 213 Harriman Hall, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3750, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  8. Brian Epstein (2012). The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences, Edited by Jarvie and Zamora-Bonilla. SAGE Publications, 2011, Xvii + 749 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):428-435.score: 60.0
    Book Reviews Brian Epstein, Economics and Philosophy , FirstView Article.
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  9. Mikhail Epstein (2010). . Common Knowledge 16 (3):367-403.score: 60.0
    In this guest column, Epstein offers “a new sign” that, he argues, resolves difficulties that have arisen in many theories and practices, including linguistics, semiotics, literary theory, poetics, aesthetics, ecology, ecophilology, eco-ethics, metaphysics, theology, psychology, and phenomenology. The new sign, a pair of quotation marks around a blank space, signfies the absence of any sign. Most generally, “ ” relates to the blank space that surrounds and underlies a text; by locating “ ” within the text, the margins are (...)
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  10. Brian Epstein (2009). Ontological Individualism Reconsidered. Synthese 166 (1):187-213.score: 30.0
    The thesis of methodological individualism in social science is commonly divided into two different claims—explanatory individualism and ontological individualism. Ontological individualism is the thesis that facts about individuals exhaustively determine social facts. Initially taken to be a claim about the identity of groups with sets of individuals or their properties, ontological individualism has more recently been understood as a global supervenience claim. While explanatory individualism has remained controversial, ontological individualism thus understood is almost universally accepted. In this paper I argue (...)
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  11. Robert Epstein, R. P. Lanza & B. F. Skinner (1981). "Self-Awareness" in the Pigeon. Science 212 (4495):695-96.score: 30.0
  12. Steven Epstein (1994). A Queer Encounter: Sociology and the Study of Sexuality. Sociological Theory 12 (2):188-202.score: 30.0
    The term queer has recently come into wide use to designate distinctive emphases in the politics and the intellectual study of sexuality. This article explores the unfortunate irony that most work falling under the rubric of queer theory has been undertaken largely at some remove from the discipline of sociology, despite the pioneering role that an earlier generation of sociologists played in formulating influential conceptions of the social construction of sexuality. The article suggests important continuities between the earlier sociological theories (...)
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  13. S. Epstein (1994). Integration of the Cognitive and the Psychodynamic Unconscious. American Psychologist 49:409-24.score: 30.0
  14. Russell Epstein (2000). The Neural-Cognitive Basis of the Jamesian Stream of Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):550-575.score: 30.0
    William James described the stream of thought as having two components: (1) a nucleus of highly conscious, often perceptual material; and (2) a fringe of dimly felt contextual information that controls the entry of information into the nucleus and guides the progression of internally directed thought. Here I examine the neural and cognitive correlates of this phenomenology. A survey of the cognitive neuroscience literature suggests that the nucleus corresponds to a dynamic global buffer formed by interactions between different regions of (...)
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  15. Ron Epstein, Ethical Dangers of Genetic Engineering.score: 30.0
    From the very first milk you suckle, your food is genetically engineered. The natural world is completely made over, invaded and distorted beyond recognition by genetically engineered trees, plants, animals, insects, bacteria, and viruses, both planned and run amok. Illnesses are very different too. Most of the old ones are gone or mutated into new forms, yet most people are suffering from genetically engineered pathogens, either used in biowarfare, or mistakenly released into the environment, or recombined in toxic form from (...)
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  16. Ron Epstein, Ethical and Spiritual Issues in Genetic Engineering.score: 30.0
    The choices I will be talking about have to do with biotechnology and genetic engineering, choices which we are currently not making consciously because we really don't know what is going on. I would like to tell you what is going on in these areas, and then talk about how we might approach this matter in ethical ways.
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  17. William M. Epstein & Gary Hatfield (1994). Gestalt Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):163-181.score: 30.0
    The Gestalt psychologists adopted a set of positions on mind-body issues that seem like an odd mix. They sought to combine a version of naturalism and physiological reductionism with an insistence on the reality of the phenomenal and the attribution of meanings to objects as natural characteristics. After reviewing basic positions in contemporary philosophy of mind, we examine the Gestalt position, characterizing it m terms of phenomenal realism and programmatic reductionism. We then distinguish Gestalt philosophy of mind from instrumentalism and (...)
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  18. Brian Epstein (2012). Sortals and Criteria of Identity. Analysis 72 (3):474-478.score: 30.0
    In a recent article, Harold Noonan argues that application conditions and criteria of identity are not distinct from one another. This seems to threaten the standard approach to distinguishing sortals from adjectival terms. I propose that his observation, while correct, does not have this consequence. I present a simple scheme for distinguishing sortals from adjectival terms. I also propose an amended version of the standard canonical form of criteria of identity.
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  19. Richard A. Epstein (2005). One Step Beyond Nozick's Minimal State: The Role of Forced Exchanges in Political Theory. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):286-313.score: 30.0
    In Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick seeks to demonstrate that principles of justice in acquisition and transfer can be applied to justify the minimal state, and no state greater than the minimal state. That approach fails to acknowledge the critical role that forced exchanges play in overcoming a range of public goods and coordination problems. These ends are accomplished by taking property for which the owner is compensated in cash or in kind in an amount that leaves him better (...)
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  20. Brian Epstein (2012). Review of Creations of the Mind, Ed. Margolis and Laurence. [REVIEW] Mind 121 (481):200-204.score: 30.0
    This fascinating collection on artifacts brings together seven papers by philosophers with nine by psychologists, biologists, and an archaeologist. The psychological papers include two excellent discussions of empirical work on the mental representation of artifact concepts – an assessment by Malt and Sloman of a large variety of studies on the conflicting ways we classify artifacts and extend our applications of artifact categories to new cases, and a review by Mahon and Caramazza of data from semantically impaired patients and from (...)
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  21. Edwin M. Epstein (1989). Business Ethics, Corporate Good Citizenship and the Corporate Social Policy Process: A View From the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (8):583 - 595.score: 30.0
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  22. Ron Epstein, A Buddhist Perspective on Animal Rights.score: 30.0
    I want to relate to you two striking examples of animals acting with more humanity than most humans. My point is not that animals are more humane than humans, but that there is dramatic evidence that animals can act in ways that do not support certain Western stereotypes about their capacities.
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  23. Russell Epstein (2004). Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.score: 30.0
  24. Lawrence A. Shapiro & William M. Epstein (1998). Evolutionary Theory Meets Cognitive Psychology: A More Selective Perspective. Mind and Language 13 (2):171-94.score: 30.0
    Quite unexpectedly, cognitive psychologists find their field intimately connected to a whole new intellectual landscape that had previously seemed remote, unfamiliar, and all but irrelevant. Yet the proliferating connections tying together the cognitive and evolutionary communities promise to transform both fields, with each supplying necessary principles, methods, and a species of rigor that the other lacks. (Cosmides and Tooby, 1994, p. 85).
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  25. Brian Epstein (2008). When Local Models Fail. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):3-24.score: 30.0
    Models treating the simple properties of social groups have a common shortcoming. Typically, they focus on the local properties of group members and the features of the world with which group members interact. I consider economic models of bureaucratic corruption, to show that (a) simple properties of groups are often constituted by the properties of the wider population, and (b) even sophisticated models are commonly inadequate to account for many simple social properties. Adequate models and social policies must treat certain (...)
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  26. Richard A. Epstein (2008). Should Antidiscrimination Laws Limit Freedom of Association? The Dangerous Allure of Human Rights Legislation. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):123-156.score: 30.0
    This article defends the classical liberal view of human interactions that gives strong protection to associational freedom except in cases that involve the use of force or fraud or the exercise of monopoly power. That conception is at war with the modern antidiscrimination or human rights laws that operate in competitive markets in such vital areas as employment and housing, with respect to matters of race, sex, age, and increasingly, disability. The article further argues that using the label to boost (...)
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  27. Ron Epstein, The Inner Ecology: Buddhist Ethics and Practice.score: 30.0
    Buddhists call Buddhism the Buddha Dharma: the Dharma, a collection of methods for getting enlightened, taught by a Buddha, a Fully Enlightened One. Buddhists refer to themselves as people who have taken refuge with the Three Jewels: 1) the Buddhas or Fully Enlightened Ones, 2) the Dharma or methods taught for reaching enlightenment, 3) and the Sangha or community of Buddhist monks and nuns, called Bhikshus and Bhikshunis. In formally becoming a Buddhist one becomes a disciple of a Buddhist master, (...)
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  28. Brian Epstein (2011). Agent-Based Modeling and the Fallacies of Individualism. In Paul Humphreys & Cyrille Imbert (eds.), Models, Simulations, and Representations. Routledge. 115444.score: 30.0
    Agent-​​based modeling is showing great promise in the social sciences. However, two misconceptions about the relation between social macroproperties and microproperties afflict agent-based models. These lead current models to systematically ignore factors relevant to the properties they intend to model, and to overlook a wide range of model designs. Correcting for these brings painful trade-​​offs, but has the potential to transform the utility of such models.
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  29. Ron Epstein, Genetic Engineering: A Buddhist Assessment.score: 30.0
    What might it be like to be a Buddhist in a future world where your life started with your parents designing your genes? In addition to screening for unwanted genetic diseases, they would have selected your genes for sex; height; eye, hair, and skin color; and, if your parents are Buddhists, maybe even for genes that allow you to sit easily in the full lotus position. Pressured by current social fads, they may also have chosen genes whose overall functions are (...)
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  30. Susan L. Epstein (1992). The Role of Memory and Concepts in Learning. Minds and Machines 2 (3):239-265.score: 30.0
    The extent to which concepts, memory, and planning are necessary to the simulation of intelligent behavior is a fundamental philosophical issue in Artificial Intelligence. An active and productive segement of the AI community has taken the position that multiple low-level agents, properly organized, can account for high-level behavior. Empirical research on these questions with fully operational systems has been restricted to mobile robots that do simple tasks. This paper recounts experiments with Hoyle, a system in a cerebral, rather than a (...)
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  31. Ron Epstein, Genetic Engineering: A Major Threat to Vegetarians.score: 30.0
    Imagine a world in which as part of their basic substances tomatoes contain fish and tobacco, potatoes contain chicken, moths and other insects, and corn contains fireflies. Is this science-fiction? No, these plant-animal hybrids already exist today and may soon be on your supermarket shelves without any special labeling to warn you. Furthermore, in a few years the types of these genetically engineered "vegetables" are sure to increase and may very possibly also include human genes. If you are a vegetarian, (...)
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  32. Brian Epstein (2010). History and the Critique of Social Concepts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (1):3-29.score: 30.0
    Many theorists, including Nietzsche, Adorno, and Foucault, have regarded genealogy as an important technique for social criticism. But it has been unclear how genealogy can go beyond the accomplishments of other, more mundane, critical methods. I propose a new approach to understanding the critical potential of history. I argue that theorists have been misled by the assumption that if a claim is deserving of criticism, it is because the claim is false. Turning to the criticism of concepts rather than criticism (...)
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  33. Michele F. Epstein (1975). The Common Ground of Merleau-Ponty's and Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Man. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (2):221-234.score: 30.0
  34. Brian Epstein (2008). The Realpolitik of Reference. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (1):1–20.score: 30.0
    What are the conditions for fixing the reference of a proper name? Debate on this point has recently been rekindled by Scott Soames, Robin Jeshion, and others. In this paper, I sketch a new pragmatic approach to the justification of reference-fixing procedures, in opposition to accounts that insist on an invariant set of conditions for fixing reference across environments and linguistic communities. Comparing reference to other relations whose instances are introduced through "initiation" procedures, I outline a picture in which the (...)
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  35. Richard A. Epstein (2002). Can Anyone Beat the Flat Tax? Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (1):140-171.score: 30.0
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  36. Brian Epstein (2008). The Internal and the External in Linguistic Explanation. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22):77-111.score: 30.0
    Chomsky and others have denied the relevance of external linguistic entities, such as E-languages, to linguistic explanation, and have questioned their coherence altogether. I discuss a new approach to understanding the nature of linguistic entities, focusing in particular on making sense of the varieties of kinds of “words” that are employed in linguistic theorizing. This treatment of linguistic entities in general is applied to constructing an understanding of external linguistic entities.
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  37. Brian Epstein (2006). Review of Millikan, Ruth Garrett, Language: A Biological Model. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 30.0
    Ruth Mil­likan is one of the most inter­est­ing and influ­en­tial philoso­phers alive. Her work is also hard to pen­e­trate. In this review, I try to present and assess her work on the nature of lan­guage, which is col­lected in this anthol­ogy. I also crit­i­cize her analy­sis of “nat­ural con­ven­tion” as well as her dis­cus­sion of illo­cu­tion­ary acts.
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  38. Richard Allen Epstein (2003). Let the Shoemaker Stick to His Last: A Defense of the "Old" Public Health. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S138-S159.score: 30.0
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  39. Fanny L. Epstein (1973). The Metaphysics of Mind-Body Identity Theories. American Philosophical Quarterly 10 (April):111-121.score: 30.0
    The article is an attempt to uncover the metaphysical assumptions implicit in the otherwise highly scientific contemporary identity theories. 1) the identity statement, Being a philosophical interpretation of dualistic psychophysical correspondence, Requires for its support a justificatory ontological or linguistic premise. 2) the conception of the mental as the hidden, Unobservable, Subjective and private is a metaphysical distortion with historical roots in an empiricist and positivist interpretation of the cartesian dichotomy of thinking and extended thing. 3) acceptance of an artificial (...)
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  40. Samuel D. Epstein (2007). Physiological Linguistics, and Some Implications Regarding Disciplinary Autonomy and Unification. Mind and Language 22 (1):44–67.score: 30.0
    Chomsky's current Biolinguistic (Minimalist) methodology is shown to comport with what might be called 'established' aspects of biological method, thereby raising, in the biolinguistic domain, issues concerning biological autonomy from the physical sciences. At least current irreducibility of biology, including biolinguistics, stems in at least some cases from the very nature of what I will claim is physiological, or inter-organ/inter-component, macro-levels of explanation which play a new and central explanatory role in Chomsky's inter-componential (interface-based) explanation of certain (anatomical) properties of (...)
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  41. Seymour Epstein (1985). The Implications of Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory for Research in Social Psychology and Personality. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (3):283–310.score: 30.0
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  42. Richard J. Epstein & Y. Zhao (2008). The Threat That Dare Not Speak Its Name: Human Extinction. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (1):116-125.score: 30.0
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  43. Miran Epstein (2010). How Will the Economic Downturn Affect Academic Bioethics? Bioethics 24 (5):226-233.score: 30.0
    An educated guess about the future of academic bioethics can only be made on the basis of the historical conditions of its success. According to its official history, which attributes its success primarily to the service it has done for the patient, it should be safe at least as long as the patient still needs its service. Like many other academic disciplines, it might suffer under the present economic downturn. However, in the plausible assumption that its social role has not (...)
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  44. Richard L. Epstein (1979). Relatedness and Implication. Philosophical Studies 36 (2):137 - 173.score: 30.0
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  45. Ron Epstein, Clearing Up Some Misconceptions About Buddhism.score: 30.0
    The historical Buddha Shakyamuni denied the divine authority of the Brahmins, the Hindu priestly class. He set up a system of taking refuge with the Three Jewels (Buddha, Dharma, Sangha) in which a member of the Buddhist monastic community becomes the representative of the Three Jewels and the teacher of individual lay Buddhists. He also set up lineages of enlightened masters, who were entrusted with the task of carrying on the authentic teachings.
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  46. Seymour Epstein (2000). The Rationality Debate From the Perspective of Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):671-671.score: 30.0
    A problem with Stanovich & West's inference that there a nonintellectual processing system independent from an intellectual one from data in which they partialled out global intelligence is that they may have controlled for the wrong kind of intellectual intelligence. Research on cognitive-experiential self-theory over the past two decades provides much stronger support for two independent processing systems.
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  47. Rosemary Pacini & Seymour Epstein (1999). The Interaction of Three Facets of Concrete Thinking in a Game of Chance. Thinking and Reasoning 5 (4):303 – 325.score: 30.0
    The ratio-bias (RB) phenomenon refers to the perceived likelihood of a low-probability event as greater when it is presented in the form of larger (e.g. 10-in-100) rather than smaller (e.g. 1-in-10) numbers. According to cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST), the RB effect in a game of chance in a win condition, in which drawing a red jellybean is rewarded, can be accounted for by two facets of concrete thinking, the greater comprehension (at the intuitive-experiential level) of single numbers than of ratios, and (...)
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  48. Richard A. Epstein (1999). Managed Care Under Siege. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):434 – 460.score: 30.0
    Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) are frequently criticized for their marketing mistakes. Often that criticism is leveled against an implicit benchmark of an ideal competitive market or an ideal system of government provision. But any accurate assessment in the choice of health care organizations always requires a comparative measure of error rates. These are high in the provision of health care, given the inherent uncertainties in both the cost and effectiveness of treatment. But the continuous and rapid evolution of private health (...)
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  49. Edwin M. Epstein (2002). Religion and Business – the Critical Role of Religious Traditions in Management Education. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):91 - 96.score: 30.0
    During the past decade many individuals have sought to create a connection between their work persona and their religious/spiritual persona. Management education has a legitimate role to play in introducing teachings drawn from our religious traditions into business ethics and other courses. Thereby, we can help prepare students to consider the possibility that business endeavors, spirituality and religious commitment can be inextricable parts of a coherent life.
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  50. Marc J. Epstein, Ruth Ann McEwen & Roxanne M. Spindle (1994). Shareholder Preferences Concerning Corporate Ethical Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):447 - 453.score: 30.0
    This study surveyed investors to determine the extent to which they preferred ethical behavior to profits and their interest in having information about corporate ethical behavior reported in the corporate annual report. First, investors were asked to determine what penalties should be assessed against employees who engage in profitable, but unethical, behavior. Second, investors were asked about their interest in using the annual report to disclose the ethical performance of the corporation and company officials. Finally, investors were asked if they (...)
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