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  1. Cyrlene Claasen & Julia Roloff (2012). The Link Between Responsibility and Legitimacy: The Case of De Beers in Namibia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):379-398.
    This article investigates the link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and the reasons for which legitimacy is ascribed or denied. It fills a gap in the literature on CSR and legitimacy that lacks empirical studies regarding the question whether CSR contributes to organisational legitimacy. The problem is discussed by referring to the case of De Beers’s diamond mining partnership with the Government of Namibia. A total of 42 interviews were conducted—41 with stakeholders and one with the focal organisation Namdeb. (...)
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  2. Julia Roloff & Michael S. Aßländer (2010). Corporate Autonomy and Buyer—Supplier Relationships: The Case of Unsafe Mattel Toys. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):517 - 534.
    This article analyses supplier-buyer relationships where the suppliers adapt to the buyers' needs and expectations to gain mutual advantages. In some cases, such closely knit relationships lead to violations of the autonomy of one or both partners. A concept of corporate autonomy (CA) is developed to analyze this problem. Three different facets can be distinguished: rule autonomy, executive autonomy, and control autonomy. A case study of Mattel's problems with lead-contaminated toys produced in China shows that the CA of buyer and (...)
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  3. Julia Roloff (2008). A Life Cycle Model of Multi-Stakeholder Networks. Business Ethics 17 (3):311–325.
    In multi-stakeholder networks, actors from civil society, business and governmental institutions come together in order to find a common solution to a problem that affects all of them. Problems approached by such networks often affect people across national boundaries, tend to be very complex and are not sufficiently understood. In multi-stakeholder networks, information concerning a problem is gathered from different sources, learning takes place, conflicts between participants are addressed and cooperation is sought. Corporations are key actors in many networks, because (...)
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  4. Julia Roloff (2008). Learning From Multi-Stakeholder Networks: Issue-Focussed Stakeholder Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):233 - 250.
    From an analysis of the role of companies in multi-stakeholder networks and a critical review of stakeholder theory, it is argued that companies practise two different types of stakeholder management: they focus on their organization’s welfare (organization- focussed stakeholder management) or on an issue that affects their relationship with other societal groups and organizations (issue-focussed stakeholder management). These two approaches supplement each other. It is demonstrated that issue-focussed stakeholder management dominates in multi-stakeholder networks, because it enables corporations to address complex (...)
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