12 found
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  1. Noam Sagiv, Julia Simner, James Collins, Brian Butterworth & Jamie Ward (2006). What is the Relationship Between Synaesthesia and Visuo-Spatial Number Forms? Cognition 101 (1):114-28.
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  2.  41
    Julia Simner (2007). Beyond Perception: Synaesthesia as a Psycholinguistic Phenomenon. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):23-29.
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  3.  13
    Jamie Ward & Julia Simner (2003). Lexical-Gustatory Synaesthesia: Linguistic and Conceptual Factors. Cognition 89 (3):237-261.
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  4.  6
    Julia Simner (2013). The “Rules” of Synesthesia. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press 149.
    Until relatively recently, researchers believed that synaesthetic sensations and their triggers were arbitrarily paired, and entirely idiosyncratic from one synaesthete to the next. Put differently, they believed that no two synaesthetes would have similar experiences from the same set of triggers, unless this had occurred by chance. This position likely arose because, prior to the internet, it was extremely difficult to recruit more than a small handful of synaesthete participants, and on the surface, synaesthetes do tend to disagree on their (...)
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  5.  9
    Julia Simner, Wan-Yu Hung & Richard Shillcock (2011). Synaesthesia in a Logographic Language: The Colouring of Chinese Characters and Pinyin/Bopomo Spellings. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1376-1392.
    Studies of linguistic synaesthesias in English have shown a range of fine-grained language mechanisms governing the associations between colours on the one hand, and graphemes, phonemes and words on the other. However, virtually nothing is known about how synaesthetic colouring might operate in non-alphabetic systems. The current study shows how synaesthetic speakers of Mandarin Chinese come to colour the logographic units of their language. Both native and non-native Chinese speakers experienced synaesthetic colours for characters, and for words spelled in the (...)
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  6.  3
    Mary Jane Spiller, Clare N. Jonas, Julia Simner & Ashok Jansari (2015). Beyond Visual Imagery: How Modality-Specific is Enhanced Mental Imagery in Synesthesia? Consciousness and Cognition 31:73-85.
  7.  9
    Kaitlyn Bankieris & Julia Simner (2015). What is the Link Between Synaesthesia and Sound Symbolism? Cognition 136:186-195.
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  8.  3
    Julia Simner & Sarah L. Haywood (2009). Tasty Non-Words and Neighbours: The Cognitive Roots of Lexical-Gustatory Synaesthesia. Cognition 110 (2):171-181.
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  9.  5
    Wan-Yu Hung, Julia Simner, Richard Shillcock & David M. Eagleman (2014). Synaesthesia in Chinese Characters: The Role of Radical Function and Position. Consciousness and Cognition 24 (1):38-48.
    Grapheme-colour synaesthetes experience unusual colour percepts when they encounter letters and/or digits. Studies of English-speaking grapheme-colour synaesthetes have shown that synaesthetic colours are sometimes triggered by rule-based linguistic mechanisms . In contrast, little is known about synaesthesia in logographic languages such as Chinese. The current study shows the mechanisms by which synaesthetic speakers of Chinese colour their language. One hypothesis is that Chinese characters might be coloured by their constituent morphological units, known as radicals, and we tested this by eliciting (...)
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  10.  3
    Jennifer L. Mankin, Christopher Thompson, Holly P. Branigan & Julia Simner (2016). Processing Compound Words: Evidence From Synaesthesia. Cognition 150:1-9.
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  11.  1
    Brian F. Gray & Julia Simner (2015). Synesthesia and Release Phenomena in Sensory and Motor Grounding. Cases of Disinhibited Embodiment? Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  12.  1
    Julia Simner & Edward M. Hubbard (2013). Synesthesia in School-Aged Children. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press 64.
    This chapter looks at synaesthesia in school aged children from approximately 5-6 years onwards. We examine how synaesthesia develops from its earliest roots both behaviourally and neurologically, and describe how this development can be affected by literacy and learning. We present evidence showing that synaesthesia emerges over time undergoing stages of 'growth' from an immature to more mature form. We also discuss the prevalence of childhood synaesthesia and the methodologies available for testing this. Next we consider how the condition can (...)
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