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  1.  69
    Ruiping Fan & Julia Tao (2004). Consent to Medical Treatment: The Complex Interplay of Patients, Families, and Physicians. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):139 – 148.
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  2.  5
    Kam-por Yu, Julia Tao & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) (2010). Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. SUNY.
    A consideration of Confucian ethics as a living ethical tradition with contemporary relevance.
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  3. Julia Tao (2005). Beyond Proceduralism: A Chinese Perspective on Cheng (Sincerity) as a Political Virtue. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):64-79.
    This essay aims to provide a philosophical analysis of the Chinese concept of cheng (sincerity) as a political virtue that could be incorporated to ground a duty of civility in liberal deliberative democracy. It is argued here that the virtue of sincerity is an essential feature of the liberal political culture taken for granted by Rawls in his theory of public reason. Ideal procedures and public discourse are not sufficient to generate civic virtues. The goal of this essay is to (...)
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  4.  24
    Julia Po-Wah Lai Tao (2000). Two Perspectives of Care: Confucian Ren and Feminist Care. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):215–240.
  5.  8
    Tse Chun-yan & Julia Tao (2004). Strategic Ambiguities in the Process of Consent: Role of the Family in Decisions to Forgo Life-Sustaining Treatment for Incompetent Elderly Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):207 – 223.
    This paper evaluates the Hong Kong approach to consent regarding the forgoing of life-sustaining treatment for incompetent elderly patients. It analyzes the contextualized approach in the (...)Hong Kong process-based, consensus-building model, in contrast to other role-based models which emphasize the establishment of a system of formal laws and a clear locus of decisional authority.Without embracing relativism, the paper argues that the Hong Kong model offers an instructive example of how strategic ambiguities can both make good sense within particular cultural context and serve important moral goals. (shrink)
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  6.  29
    Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.) (2002). Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Pub..
    This collection of papers explores one of the central debates in the field of bioethics in the new century. It evaluates the controversy between the claim that there is a common morality accepted by all and the opposing view that there are different moral visions and moral rationalities, within which complex bioethical issues demand a solution. Contributions within this volume offer different approaches and perspectives on the pursuit of global ethics in the new century. They are organized under five (...)
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  7.  9
    Julia Tao & Andrew Brennan (2003). Confucian and Liberal Ethics for Public Policy: Holistic or Atomistic? Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):572–589.
  8.  15
    Julia Tao (1990). The Chinese Moral Ethos and the Concept of Individual Rights. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):119-127.
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  9.  9
    Brian Brewer, Anthony B. L. Cheung & Julia Tao (2005). Whose Reason? Which Rationality? Understanding the 'Real Worlds' of Hong Kong's Public Managers. Philosophy of Management 5 (1):3-14.
    Based on empirical data from a qualitative study, this paper explores the complexity of ‘real world’ management in Hong Kong’s public sector, as contrasted with various paradigmatic claims under ‘new public management’ (NPM). A plurality of sub-worlds within the broad public sector is identified, which makes the management roles and responsibilities much less ‘homogenised’ than depicted in NPM exhortations. The instrumental rationality underpinning NPM is identified as too restrictive in understanding the way in which public managers reach decisions. When the (...)
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  10.  3
    Brian Brewer, Anthony B. L. Cheung & Julia Tao (2005). Whose Reason? Which Rationality? Understanding the 'Real Worlds' of Hong Kong's Public Managers. Philosophy of Management 5 (1):3-14.
    Based on empirical data from a qualitative study, this paper explores the complexity of ‘real world’ management in Hong Kong’s public sector, as contrasted with various paradigmatic claims under ‘new public management’ (NPM). A plurality of sub-worlds within the broad public sector is identified, which makes the management roles and responsibilities much less ‘homogenised’ than depicted in NPM exhortations. The instrumental rationality underpinning NPM is identified as too restrictive in understanding the way in which public managers reach decisions. When the (...)
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  11.  9
    Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (2005). Beyond Proceduralism: A Chinese Perspective On. Philosophy East and West 55 (1).
    : This essay aims to provide a philosophical analysis of the Chinese concept of cheng (sincerity) as a political virtue that could be incorporated to ground a duty of civility in liberal deliberative democracy. It is argued here that the virtue of sincerity is an essential feature of the liberal political culture taken for granted by Rawls in his theory of public reason. Ideal procedures and public discourse are not sufficient to generate civic virtues. The goal of this essay is (...)
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  12. Julia Tao, Philip J. Ivanhoe & Kam-por Yu (eds.) (201). Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. SUNY Press.
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  13. Julia Tao, Anthony B. L. Cheung, Martin Painter & Chenyang Li (eds.) (2015). Governance for Harmony in Asia and Beyond. Routledge.
    Harmony has become a major challenge for modern governance in the twenty-first century because of the multi-religious, multi-racial and multi-ethnic character of our increasingly globalized societies. Governments all over the world are facing growing pressure to integrate the many diverse elements and subcultures which make up modern pluralistic societies. This book examines the idea of harmony, and its place in politics and governance, both in theory and practice, in Asia, the West and elsewhere. It explores and analyses the meanings, mechanisms, (...)
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