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Julian Young [47]Julian P. Young [2]Julian Padraic Young [1]
  1.  16
    Julian Young (2001). Heidegger's Later Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Heidegger's later philosophy has often been regarded as a lapse into unintelligible mysticism. While not ignoring its deep and difficult complexities, Julian Young's book explains in simple and straightforward language just what it is all about. It examines Heidegger's identification of loss of 'the gods', the violence of technology, and humanity's 'homelessness' as symptoms of the destitution of modernity, and his notion that overcoming 'oblivion of Being' is the essence of a turning to a post-destitute, genuinely post-modern existence. Young argues (...)
  2.  1
    Julian Young (2010). Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography. Cambridge University Press.
    Da Capo -- Pforta -- Bonn -- Leipzig -- Schopenhauer -- Basel -- Richard Wagner and the birth of The birth of tragedy -- War and aftermath -- Anal philology -- Untimely meditations -- Aimez-vous Brahms? -- Auf Wiedersehen Bayreuth -- Sorrento -- Human, all-too-human -- The wanderer and his shadow -- Dawn -- The gay science -- The Salomé affair -- Zarathustra -- Nietzsche's circle of women -- Beyond good and evil -- Clearing the decks -- The genealogy of (...)
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  3.  44
    Julian Young (2005). Schopenhauer. Routledge.
    Arthur Schopenhauer was one of the greatest writers and German philosophers of the nineteenth century. His work influenced figures as diverse as Wagner, Freud and Nietzsche. Best known as a pessimist, he was one of the few philosophers read and admired by Wittgenstein. In this comprehensive introduction, Julian Young covers all the main aspects of Schopenhauer's philosophy. Beginning with an overview of Schopenhauer's life and work, he introduces the central aspects of his metaphysics fundamental to understanding his work as a (...)
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  4. Julian Young (1997). Heidegger, Philosophy, Nazism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Since 1945, and particularly since the facts of the 'Heidegger case' became widely known in 1987, an enormous number of words have been devoted to establishing not only Heidegger's involvement with Nazism, but also that his philosophy is irredeemably discredited thereby. This book, while in no way denying the depth or seriousness of Heidegger's political involvement , challenges this tide of opinion, arguing that his philosophy is not compromised in any of its phases, and that acceptance of it is fully (...)
     
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  5.  1
    Julian Young (2004). Heidegger's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, the first comprehensive study in English of Heidegger's philosophy of art, starts in the mid-1930s with Heidegger's discussion of the Greek temple and his Hegelian declaration that a great artwork gathers together an entire culture in affirmative celebration of its foundational 'truth', and that, by this criterion, art in modernity is 'dead'. His subsequent work on Hölderlin, whom he later identified as the decisive influence on his mature philosophy, led him into a passionate engagement with the art of (...)
  6. Julian Young (2011). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    In his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche observes that Greek tragedy gathered people together as a community in the sight of their gods, and argues that modernity can be rescued from 'nihilism' only through the revival of such a festival. This is commonly thought to be a view which did not survive the termination of Nietzsche's early Wagnerianism, but Julian Young argues, on the basis of an examination of all of Nietzsche's published works, that his religious communitarianism in (...)
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  7. Julian Young (2003). The Death of God and the Meaning of Life. Routledge.
    What is the meaning of life? In the post-modern, post-religious scientific world, this question is becoming a preoccupation. But it also has a long history: many major figures in philosophy had something to say on the subject. This book begins with an historical overview of philosophers from Plato to Hegel and Marx who have believed in some sort of meaning of life, either in some supposed "other" world or in the future of this world. Young goes on to look at (...)
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  8.  73
    Julian Young (2005). Death and Transfiguration: Kant, Schopenhauer and Heidegger on the Sublime. Inquiry 48 (2):131 – 144.
    The feeling of the sublime is, says Kant, the bitter-sweet combination of fear and utter security that one experiences in the face of, for instance, the night sky or the raging torrent. Fear of what? Fear of - this, I suggest, was Kant's seminal insight - death. But how can these feelings co-exist? Surely the one cancels the other out? Schopenhauer's great insight, I argue, was that the explanation of the sublime requires a division of the personality into two - (...)
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  9.  4
    Julian Young (1995). Being and Value: Heidegger Contra Nietzsche. International Studies in Philosophy 27 (3):105-116.
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  10.  48
    Julian Young (1999). Artwork and Sportwork: Heideggerian Reflections. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):267-277.
  11.  23
    Julian Young (1992). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive treatment of Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art to appear in English. Julian Young argues that Nietzsche's thought about art can only be understood in the context of his wider philosophy. In particular, he discusses the dramatic changes in Nietzschean aesthetics against the background of the celebrated themes of the death of God, eternal recurrence and the idea of the Ubermensch. Young then divides Nietzsche's career, and his philosophy of art, into four distinct phases, but suggests that (...)
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  12.  21
    Julian Young (1987). Willing and Unwilling: A Study in the Philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer. Distributors, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Chapter 1 Idealism § 1 Introduction Schopenhauer says that his philosophy grows out of Kant's, as from its "parent stem" (WR I p.501). ...
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  13. Julian Young (2006). The Fourfold. In Charles B. Guignon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger. Cambridge University Press 2--373.
     
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  14.  43
    Julian Young (1999). Poets and Rivers: Heidegger on Hölderlin's “Der Ister”. Dialogue 38 (02):391-.
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  15.  32
    Julian Young (2011). Heidegger's Heimat. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):285 - 293.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 2, Page 285-293, May 2011.
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  16.  11
    Julian Young (1973). Intentionality. Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):696-722.
  17.  49
    Julian Young (2008). Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Death and Salvation. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):311-324.
  18. Julian Young (2007). Nihilism and the Meaning of Life. In Brian Leiter & Michael Rosen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Continental Philosophy. Oxford University Press
  19.  39
    Julian Young (2008). Richard Wagner and the Birth of the Birth of Tragedy. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (2):217 – 245.
    Nietzsche writes that the 'real task' of The Birth of Tragedy is to 'solve the puzzle of Wagner's relation to Greek tragedy'. The 'puzzle', I suggest, is the intermingling in his art and writings of earlier socialist optimism with later Schopenhauerian pessimism. According to the former the function of the 'rebirth of Greek tragedy' in the 'collective artwork' is to 'collect', and so create, community. According to the second the function of the artwork is to intimate a realm 'beyond' this (...)
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  20.  20
    Julian Young (1972). Rabbits. Philosophical Studies 23 (3):170 - 185.
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  21.  16
    Julian Young (1984). Schopenhauer's Critique of Kantian Ethics. Kant-Studien 75 (1-4):191-212.
    The paper examines fine criticisms schopenhauer makes of kant's ethics: (1) it makes the moral life too intellectual (2) he attempts to base morality on rationality or failure (3) the notion of a "categorical" imperative is unintelligible (4) kant's ethics is in fact endaemonic and his moral theology circular (5) universalisability commits kant to psychological egoism. schopenhauer is agreed with on (1) and (2), otherwise rejected.
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  22.  15
    Julian P. Young (1987). The Standpoint of Eternity: Schopenhauer on Art. Kant-Studien 78 (1-4):424-441.
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  23.  21
    Julian Young (1984). Wittgenstein, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Critical Philosophy. Theoria 50 (2-3):73-105.
  24.  18
    Julian P. Young (1993). On Compelling Chance to Dance in Star-Rounds: Nietzsche, History and Hegel. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 6:57-72.
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  25. Julian Young (1987). A Schopenhauerian Solution to Schopenhauerian Pessimism. Schopenhauer Jahrbuch 68:53-69.
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  26.  10
    Julian Young (2011). Reply to Professor Anderson. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 42 (1):121-121.
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  27.  9
    Julian Young (1995). Being and Value. International Studies in Philosophy 27 (3):105-116.
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  28.  1
    Julian Young (1984). Schopenhauer: His Philosophical Achievement. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):98-100.
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  29.  9
    Julian Young (2010). Review of Jonathan R. Cohen, Science, Culture, and Free Spirits: A Study of Nietzsche's Human, All-Too-Human. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  30.  2
    Julian Young (2012). Second Reply to Professor Anderson. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (2):362-365.
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  31.  6
    Julian Young (1981). Evidence and Assurance. Philosophical Studies 28:392-395.
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  32.  5
    Julian Young (1995). Contextual Authority and Aesthetic Truth. International Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):117-118.
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  33.  7
    Julian Young (2000). On How Not to Cross the Great Divide. Dialogue 39 (01):157-.
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  34.  4
    Julian Young (1984). Kant's Theory of Mind. Philosophical Studies 30:247-252.
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  35.  5
    Julian Young (2005). Review of Lawrence Hatab, Nietzsche's Life Sentence: Coming to Terms with Eternal Recurrence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
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  36.  3
    Julian Young (1996). Theories of Human Nature Peter Loptson Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 1995, X + 262 Pp., $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 35 (03):620-.
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  37. Julian Young (1998). Death and Authenticity. In J. E. Malpas & Robert C. Solomon (eds.), Death and Philosophy. Routledge 112--19.
     
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  38. Julian Young (2001). Heidegger and Modern Art. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  39. Julian Young & Kenneth Haynes (eds.) (2002). Heidegger: Off the Beaten Track. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of texts is Heidegger's first post-war book and contains some of the major expositions of his later philosophy. Of particular note are 'The Origin of the Work of Art', perhaps the most discussed of all of Heidegger's essays, and 'Nietzsche's Word 'God is Dead',' which sums up a decade of Nietzsche research. Although translations of the essays have appeared individually in a variety of places, this is the first English translation to bring them all together as Heidegger intended. (...)
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  40. Julian Young (ed.) (2014). Individual and Community in Nietzsche's Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    According to Bertrand Russell, Nietzsche's only value is the flourishing of the exceptional individual. The well-being of ordinary people is, in itself, without value. Yet there are passages in Nietzsche that appear to regard the flourishing of the community as a whole alongside, perhaps even above, that of the exceptional individual. The ten essays that comprise this volume wrestle with the tension between individual and community in Nietzsche's writings. Some defend a reading close to Russell's. Others suggest that Nietzsche's highest (...)
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  41. Julian Young (1988). Is Schopenhauer an Irrationalist? Schopenhauer Jahrbuch 69:85-100.
     
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  42. Julian Young (1989). Kathleen Marie Higgins: "Nietzsche's Zarathustra". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67:349.
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  43. Julian Young (2012). Nietzsche's New Religion. In P. D. Bubbio & P. Redding (eds.), Religion After Kant: God and Culture in the Idealist Era. Cambridge Scholars Press
     
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  44.  0
    Julian Young (2007). Nietzsche on Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (4):442-444.
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  45. Julian Young (1996). Schopenhauer, Heidegger, Art, and the Will. In Dale Jacquette (ed.), Schopenhauer, Philosophy, and the Arts. Cambridge University Press 162--80.
     
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  46. Julian Young (2014). The Philosophies of Richard Wagner. Lexington Books.
    Julian Young presents Richard Wagner as an important philosopher of art and life, first as a utopian anarchist-communist and then as a Schopenhauerian pessimist. Understanding Wagner’s philosophy is crucial to understanding his operas, as it is to understanding Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, and Heidegger.
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  47. Julian Young (2013). The Philosophy of Tragedy: From Plato to Žižek. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a full survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present. From Aristotle to Žižek the focal question has been: why, in spite of its distressing content, do we value tragic drama? What is the nature of the 'tragic effect'? Some philosophers point to a certain kind of pleasure that results from tragedy. Others, while not excluding pleasure, emphasize the knowledge we gain from tragedy – of psychology, ethics, freedom or immortality. Through a critical engagement (...)
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  48. Julian Young (2007). Zarathustra’s Last Supper: Nietzsche’s Eight Higher Men, by Weaver Santaniello. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 7.
     
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