Search results for 'Julie Cook' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    Julie Cook (1998). The Philosophical Colonization of Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 20 (3):227-246.
    There is general agreement among ecofeminists regarding the desirability of a variety of expressions of ecofeminism, but this pluralism is under threat with the emergence of an approach that emphasizes the primacy of a philosophical ecofeminism which claims the authority to prescribe what ecofeminism should be. The recent anthology Ecological Feminism is symptomatic of this trend, with contributors who affirm the philosophical significance of ecological feminism by privileging philosophers’ voices over those of other ecofeminists, rather than by engaging in critical (...)
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  2.  2
    Takeshi Morimoto, Tejal K. Gandhi, Julie M. Fiskio, Andrew C. Seger, Joseph W. So, E. Francis Cook, Tsuguya Fukui & David W. Bates (2004). An Evaluation of Risk Factors for Adverse Drug Events Associated with Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (4):499-509.
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  3. Julie Adkins, Kathleen Arnold, Kurt Borchard, David Cook, Jeff Ferrell, Vincent Lyon-Callo, Jürgen von Mahs, Don Mitchell, Rob Rosenthal, Michael Rowe, Lynn A. Staeheli & J. Talmadge Wright (2012). Professional Lives, Personal Struggles: Ethics and Advocacy in Research on Homelessness. Lexington Books.
    This is the first book published that specifically examines questions of ethics and advocacy that arise in conducting research on homelessness, exploring the issues through the deeply personal experiences of some of the field’s leading scholars. By examining the central queries from a broad range of perspectives, the authors presented here draw upon years of rich investigations to generate a framework that will be instructive for researchers across a wide spectrum of areas of inquiry.
     
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  4. Nancy Armstrong, Deborah Cook, James Cruise, Lisa Eck, Megan Heffernan, David Jenemann, Nigel Joseph, Tom McCall, Lucy McNeece, JoAnne Myers, Julie Orlemanski, Jonathon Penny, Dale Shin, Vivasvan Soni, Frederick Turner & Philip Weinstein (2011). Individualism: The Cultural Logic of Modernity. Lexington Books.
    Individualism: The Cultural Logic of Modernity is an edited collection of sixteen essays on the idea of the modern sovereign individual in the western cultural tradition. Reconsidering the eighteenth-century realist novel, twentieth-century modernism, and underappreciated topics on individualism and literature, this volume provocatively revises and enriches our understanding of individualism as the generative premise of modernity itself.
     
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  5.  0
    Julie Cook (2003). [Book Review] Ecofeminist Philosophy. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 12 (1):131-133.
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  6.  4
    R. M. D., A. J. B. Wace & F. H. Cook (1935). Mediterranean and Near East Embroideries From the Collection of Mrs. F. H. Cook. Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:271.
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  7.  5
    Deborah Cook (1987). Arthur Kroker and David Cook, The Postmodern Scene: Excremental Culture and Hyperaesthetics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (3):114-116.
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  8.  4
    Cecil H. Smith, C. Amy Hutton & Wyndham Francis Cook (1909). Catalogue of the Antiquities (Greek, Etruscan, and Roman) in the Collection of the Late Wyndham Francis Cook, Esquire. Journal of Hellenic Studies 29:375.
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  9.  1
    John W. Cook (1987). Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein: JOHN W. COOK. Religious Studies 23 (2):199-219.
    In recent years there has been a tendency in some quarters to see an affinity between the views of Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein on the subject of religious belief. It seems to me that this is a mistake, that Kierkegaard's views were fundamentally at odds with Wittgenstein's. That this fact is not generally recognized is, I suspect, owing to the obscurity of Kierkegaard's most fundamental assumptions. My aim here is to make those assumptions explicit and to show how they differ from (...)
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  10.  0
    Daniel J. Cook (2009). Leibniz on ‘Prophets’, Prophecy, and Revelation: DANIEL J. COOK. Religious Studies 45 (3):269-287.
    During Leibniz's lifetime, interest in the interpretation of the Bible and biblical prophecy became central to the theological and political concerns of Protestant Europe. Leibniz's treatment of this phenomenon will be examined in the light of his views on the nature of revelation and its role in his defence of Christianity. It will be argued that Leibniz's defence of the miracle of revelation – unlike his arguments on behalf of the core Christian mysteries of the Trinity and Incarnation – is (...)
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  11.  0
    John W. Cook (1988). Wittgenstein and Religious Belief: John W. Cook. Philosophy 63 (246):427-452.
    I find myself in profound disagreement with Wittgenstein's philosophy of religion and hence in disagreement also with those philosophers who have undertaken to elaborate and defend Wittgenstein's position. My principal objection is to the idea that religion is a language-game and that because of the kind of language-game it is, religious believers are not to be thought of as necessarily harbouring beliefs about the world over and above their secular beliefs. I reject this position, not because I think that there (...)
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  12.  2
    R. M. Cook & J. M. C. Toynbee (1953). Festgabe für Arnold von Salis zu seinem siebzigsten Geburtstag am 29 Juli 1951. Pp. 305; 4 plates, 66 text figs. Basel: Schwabe, 1951. Paper, 12 Sw. fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (3-4):209-210.
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  13.  25
    Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.) (2012). The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Foreword (Warren Ellis).Introduction (Roy T. Cook and Aaron Meskin).PART I: The Nature and Kinds of Comics.1. Redefining Comics (John Holbo).2. The Ontology of Comics (Aaron Meskin).3. Comics and Collective Authorship (Christy Mag Uidhir).4. Comics and Genre (Catharine Abell).PART 2: Comics and Representation.5. Wordy Pictures: Theorizing the Relationship between Image and Text in Comics (Thomas E. Wartenberg).6. What's So Funny? Comic Content in Depiction (Patrick Maynard).7. The Language of Comics (Darren Hudson Hick).PART 3: Comics and the (...)
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  14. Roy T. Cook & Philip A. Ebert (2005). Abstraction and Identity. Dialectica 59 (2):121–139.
    A co-authored article with Roy T. Cook forthcoming in a special edition on the Caesar Problem of the journal Dialectica. We argue against the appeal to equivalence classes in resolving the Caesar Problem.
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  15.  35
    M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
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  16.  47
    John W. Cook (1994). Wittgenstein's Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    Wittgenstein's Metaphysics offers a radical new interpretation of the fundamental ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein. It takes issue with the conventional view that after 1930 Wittgenstein rejected the philosophy of the Tractatus and developed a wholly new conception of philosophy. By tracing the evolution of Wittgenstein's ideas Cook shows that they are neither as original nor as difficult as is often supposed. Wittgenstein was essentially an empiricist, and the difference between his early views (as set forth in the Tractatus) and (...)
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  17. John W. Cook (1999). Morality and Cultural Differences. Oxford University Press.
    The scholars who defend or dispute moral relativism, the idea that a moral principle cannot be applied to people whose culture does not accept it, have concerned themselves with either the philosophical or anthropological aspects of relativism. This study, shows that in order to arrive at a definitive appraisal of moral relativism, it is necessary to understand and investigate both its anthropological and philosophical aspects. Carefully examining the arguments for and against moral relativism, Cook exposes not only that anthropologists (...)
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  18.  7
    Monte Cook (2002). Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):189-200.
    Monte Cook - Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 189-200 Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle Monte Cook THE CARTESIAN PHILOSOPHER ROBERT DESGABETS'S only philosophical publication is his Critique de la Critique de la Recherche de la vérité , in which he criticizes Simon Foucher's criticism of Malebranche's Search After Truth. This work has never been republished and is now available only in rare book collections. Desgabets also (...)
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  19.  41
    Nicholas Cook (1990). Music, Imagination, and Culture. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on psychological and philosophical materials as well as the analysis of specific musical examples, Cook here defines the difference between music...
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  20.  5
    Deborah Cook (2012). Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):266 - 268.
    Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 266-268 Authors Deborah Cook, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4, Canada Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 2 / 2012.
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  21.  6
    B. G. Cook (2012). Ibn Sab'în and Islamic Orthodoxy: A Reassessment. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 8 (2012):Article - 2.
    Benjamin G. Cook, Ibn Sabʿîn and Islamic Orthodoxy: A Reassessment.
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  22.  22
    John Cook (2006). Did Wittgenstein Practise What He Preached? Philosophy 81 (3):445-462.
    Wittgenstein made numerous pronouncements about philosophical method. But did he practice what he preached? Cook addresses this question by studying Wittgenstein’s treatment of the problem of other minds, tracing a line of argument that runs through his writings and lectures from the early 1930s to the 1950s. Cook finds that there is an inconsistency between Wittgenstein’s methodological advice and his actual practice. Instead of bringing words back from their metaphysical to their everyday use, he allows himself to use (...)
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  23. M. A. Cook (2003). Forbidding Wrong in Islam: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Michael Cook's classic study, Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought (Cambridge, 2001), reflected upon the Islamic injunction to forbid wrongdoing. This book is a short, accessible survey of the same material. Using Islamic history to illustrate his argument, Cook unravels the complexities of the subject by demonstrating how the past informs the present. At the book's core is an important message about the values of Islamic traditions and their relevance in the modern world.
     
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  24. Albert Cook (1996). The Stance of Plato. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The Stance of Plato addresses Plato's particular fusion of literature and philosophy. Albert Cook examines a number of Plato's major dialogues to ascertain further the bearing of "rhetoric" and the dramatized dialogue on the relationship between literature and philosophy. Using an engaging and occasionally poetic style, Cook studies the implications of Plato's literary form and the historical context of his ideas. The Stance of Plato helps bridge the gap between scholars interested in Plato's arguments and logic and those (...)
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  25.  10
    Roy T. Cook (2014). The Yablo Paradox: An Essay on Circularity. OUP Oxford.
    Roy T Cook examines the Yablo paradox--a paradoxical, infinite sequence of sentences, each of which entails the falsity of all others that follow it. He focuses on questions of characterization, circularity, and generalizability, and pays special attention to the idea that it provides us with a semantic paradox that involves no circularity.
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  26.  25
    John W. Cook (2000). Wittgenstein, Empiricism, and Language. Oxford University Press.
    This provocative study exposes the ways in which Wittgenstein's philosophical views have been misunderstood, including the failure to recognize the reductionist character of Wittgenstein's work. Author John Cook provides well-documented proof that Wittgenstein did not hold views commonly attributed to him, arguing that Wittgenstein's later work was mistakenly seen as a development of G. E. Moore's philosophy--which Wittgenstein in fact vigorously attacked. He also points to an underestimation of Russell's influence on Wittgenstein's thinking. Cook goes on to show (...)
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  27.  44
    Roy Cook (2002). Counterintuitive Consequences of the Revision Theory of Truth. Analysis 62 (273):16–22.
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  28.  12
    Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook (2008). Stakeholder Dialogue and Organisational Learning: Changing Relationships Between Companies and NGOs. Business Ethics 17 (1):35–46.
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  29.  5
    Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook (2006). It's Good to Talk? Examining Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility Dialogue and Engagement Processes. Business Ethics 15 (2):154–170.
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  30.  3
    Ann Freeman Cook & Helena Hoas (2006). Re-Framing the Question: What Do We Really Want to Know About Rural Healthcare Ethics? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):51 – 53.
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  31.  8
    Ann Cook & Helena Hoas (1999). Are Healthcare Ethics Committees Necessary in Rural Hospitals? HEC Forum 11 (2):134-139.
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  32.  51
    Roy T. Cook (2002). Vagueness and Mathematical Precision. Mind 111 (442):225-247.
    One of the main reasons for providing formal semantics for languages is that the mathematical precision afforded by such semantics allows us to study and manipulate the formalization much more easily than if we were to study the relevant natural languages directly. Michael Tye and R. M. Sainsbury have argued that traditional set-theoretic semantics for vague languages are all but useless, however, since this mathematical precision eliminates the very phenomenon (vagueness) that we are trying to capture. Here we meet this (...)
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  33.  6
    Stephen A. Cook & Robert A. Reckhow (1979). The Relative Efficiency of Propositional Proof Systems. Journal of Symbolic Logic 44 (1):36-50.
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  34.  4
    E. David Cook (2007). Always Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):17 – 19.
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  35.  80
    Roy T. Cook (2006). Knights, Knaves and Unknowable Truths. Analysis 66 (289):10–16.
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  36.  12
    Monte Cook (2005). Desgabets on the Creation of Eternal Truths. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):21-36.
  37.  30
    Scott Cook (1997). Zhuang Zi and His Carving of the Confucian Ox. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):521-553.
    Zhuang Zi's relation to the Confucian school is reexamined. It is argued that although Zhuang Zi was fond of highlighting the absurdities of the Confucian enterprise, we can nonetheless detect in his writings a great admiration for much of what constituted the central core of the Confucian vision. This essay analyzes Confucius' image of "musical perfection," representing the total concordance of ritual restraints and harmonious freedom; traces the Confucian notion of self-cultivation through Mencius' passage on the "full-flowing energy"; and concludes (...)
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  38.  27
    Monte Cook (1980). If 'Cat' is a Rigid Designator, What Does It Designate? Philosophical Studies 37 (1):61-4.
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  39. Roy T. Cook (2003). Review of J. Mayberry, The Foundations of Mathematics in the Theory of Sets. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):347-352.
  40.  20
    Martin L. Cook (2000). "Immaculate War": Constraints on Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):55–65.
    Although military personnel are required to follow all legal orders, morally the traditional contract between soldier and state rests on shared assumptions about the purposes for which national militaries will and will not be used.
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  41.  2
    Ann Freeman Cook & Helena Hoas (2000). Where the Rubber Hits the Road: Implications for Organizational and Clinical Ethics in Rural Healthcare Settings. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 12 (4):331-340.
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  42.  29
    Roy T. Cook (2002). The State of the Economy: Neo-Logicism and Inflationt. Philosophia Mathematica 10 (1):43-66.
    In this paper I examine the prospects for a successful neo–logicist reconstruction of the real numbers, focusing on Bob Hale's use of a cut-abstraction principle. There is a serious problem plaguing Hale's project. Natural generalizations of this principle imply that there are far more objects than one would expect from a position that stresses its epistemological conservativeness. In other words, the sort of abstraction needed to obtain a theory of the reals is rampantly inflationary. I also indicate briefly why this (...)
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  43.  81
    J. Thomas Cook (1987). Deciding to Believe Without Self-Deception. Journal of Philosophy 84 (August):441-446.
  44.  75
    Roy T. Cook & Jon Cogburn (2000). What Negation is Not: Intuitionism and ‘0=1’. Analysis 60 (265):5–12.
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  45.  10
    Rebecca J. Cook & Bernard M. Dickens (2002). The Injustice of Unsafe Motherhood. Developing World Bioethics 2 (1):64–81.
  46.  53
    John W. Cook (1965). Wittgenstein on Privacy. Philosophical Review 74 (3):281-314.
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  47.  14
    N. D. Cook (1999). Simulating Consciousness in a Bilateral Neural Network: ''Nuclear'' and ''Fringe'' Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (1):62-93.
    A technique for the bilateral activation of neural nets that leads to a functional asymmetry of two simulated ''cerebral hemispheres'' is described. The simulation is designed to perform object recognition, while exhibiting characteristics typical of human consciousness-specifically, the unitary nature of conscious attention, together with a dual awareness corresponding to the ''nucleus'' and ''fringe'' described by William James (1890). Sensory neural nets self-organize on the basis of five sensory features. The system is then taught arbitrary symbolic labels for a small (...)
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  48.  32
    Roy T. Cook (2003). Aristotelian Logic, Axioms, and Abstraction. Philosophia Mathematica 11 (2):195-202.
    Stewart Shapiro and Alan Weir have argued that a crucial part of the demonstration of Frege's Theorem (specifically, that Hume's Principle implies that there are infinitely many objects) fails if the Neo-logicist cannot assume the existence of the empty property, i.e., is restricted to so-called Aristotelian Logic. Nevertheless, even in the context of Aristotelian Logic, Hume's Principle implies much of the content of Peano Arithmetic. In addition, their results do not constitute an objection to Neo-logicism so much as a clarification (...)
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  49.  26
    Nicholas Cook (1987). Musical Form and the Listener. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):23-29.
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  50.  2
    Waldo L. Cook (1911). Fraternal Basis of Socialism. International Journal of Ethics 22 (1):69-84.
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