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Julie Van Camp [21]Julie C. Van Camp [6]
  1. Julie Van Camp, Deep Thought: For (Mostly) Men Only? Does It Matter?
    An important milestone was crossed recently in the discipline of philosophy, but hardly anyone seems to have noticed. In 2004, for the first time since statistics have been gathered on such things, women earned more than 30 percent of the doctorates in philosophy in this country, 33.3 percent, up from 27.1 percent the year before. The highest percentage women had achieved previously in philosophy was 29.4 percent, in..
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  2. Julie van Camp, Judging Aesthetic Value: 2 Live Crew, Pretty Woman, and the Supreme Court.
    The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that a parody by the rap group 2 Live Crew of Ray Orbison's song "Oh, Pretty Woman" was "fair use" and thus did not infringe the copyright. Although the court insisted that it was not evaluating the quality of the parody, I argue that it does in fact make several aesthetic evaluations and sometimes even seems to praise the content of the parody. I first consider the stated reasons for the claimed refusal of the (...)
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  3. Julie van Camp, "Philosophy of Dance" (Essay-Review).
    Philosophical consideration of dance has gained in vigor, diversity, and sophistication in recent decades -- even though philosophers disagree sharply on what philosophy is! Divergent methodological approaches range from the phenomenological explorations of Maxine Sheets- Johnstone, the existentialist approach of Sandra Horton Fraleigh, and the postmodernist continental work of Susan Foster to more traditional "British-American" analysis by such well-known philosophers as Nelson Goodman, Joseph Margolis, and Francis Sparshott.
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  4. Julie Van Camp, Abstract.
    I consider why women philosophers, once identified and given recognition, too often seem to drop from the intellectual radar screen or, at least, to drop mainly to the land of footnotes and bibliographies. Are they disappearing any more than men of comparable stature from their generation? Is there anything we can do about this? Can we do more than excavate and recognize women in philosophy? What can we do to continue and enhance their presence in the historic dialogue of philosophy?
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  5. Julie Van Camp, Computer Ethics: Codes, Commandments, and Quandries.
    Surprise – these much-publicized rules are not the least bit reassuring to people who specialize in the study of ethics. While attention to ethics is certainly welcome, these ethical codes provide a too-easy cop-out, a way to neatly dispose of attention to nagging and pervasive problems. The typical professional code is little more than a checklist of rules that enables professionals of any stripe to give lip service to ethical behavior without engaging in continuing dialogue on ethical dilemmas. Neatly packaged (...)
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  6. Julie Van Camp, Dance Criticism by Croce, Denby, and Siegel.
    This article may be printed or downloaded for personal, scholarly, or educational use, but only if the full citation, copyright notice, and this permission notice are included in full. It may not be sold or otherwise used for commercial purposes without written permission.
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  7. Julie Van Camp, Footnotes.
    Dance is an elusive art form, existing in the moment of performance. Its transience poses special obstacles to analysis by scholars. Program notes, reports by critics, personal memories, and still photographs provide secondary sources limited in their potential for sustained analysis and study of actual dances.
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  8. Julie Van Camp, How Ontology Saved Free Speech in Cyberspace.
    Reno v. ACLU , the 1997 landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court providing sweeping protection to speech on the Internet, is usually discussed in terms of familiar First Amendment issues. Little noticed in the decision is the significance of the ontological assumptions of the justices in their first visit to cyberspace. I analyze the apparent awareness of the Supreme Court of ontological issues and problems with their approaches. I also argue that their current ontological assumptions have left open (...)
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  9. Julie Van Camp, Philosophy in the Contemporary World.
    This is the journal of the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, which is committed to the application of philosophy in the understanding and solution of contemporary ethical and conceptual problems. The journal provides a peer-reviewed venue for continuing dialogues in applied philosophy, philosophy and public policy, philosophy of the professions, race and gender studies, environmental philosophy, educational philosophy, and a range of multi-cultural issues. Philosophy in the Contemporary World invites original, creative, and unconventional thinking, welcomes both analytical and (...)
     
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  10. Julie Van Camp, Philosophical Problems of Dance Criticism.
    NOTE: This dissertation may be downloaded, saved, printed, and reproduced for personal, non-profit educational, and scholarly uses, but only if this complete permissions notice and the full copyright notice are included with any such uses. This dissertation may not be sold or otherwise used for commercial purposes. For commercial use, please contact the author.
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  11. Julie Van Camp, Philosophy: What Can You Do with It? What Can You Do Without It!
    Philosophers perpetually find ourselves justifying our existence in a pragmatic go-go capitalistic world. Aren’t we the head-in-the-clouds people indulging in endless debates about how many angels fit on the head of a pin? The absent-minded professors who argue that the physical world might not exist- - even as we step aside to avoid that bus bearing down on us? The granola-heads who delight in pondering a world of brains-in-vats?
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  12. Julie Van Camp, The Humanities and Dance Criticism.
    /p. 14 The humanities, as defined by Congress, include the history, theory, and criticism of the arts. While the National Endowment for the Arts funds the creation, performance, and display of art, the National Endowment for the Humanities funds the theoretical dimensions that place the arts within a broader cultural context. Admittedly, the line is sometimes difficult to draw precisely, but generally, the humanities center on verbal analysis of the phenomenon of art, using the methodology and content of various humanities (...)
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  13. Julie Van Camp (forthcoming). Freedom of Expression at the National Endowment for the Arts: An Opportunity for Interdisciplinary Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  14. Renee M. Conroy & Julie C. van Camp (2013). Introduction: Dance Art and Science. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):167-168.
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  15. Julie C. van Camp (2009). Review of John Stuart Mill, Louis J. Matz (Ed.), Three Essays on Religion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  16. Julie C. Van Camp (2007). How Religion Co-Opts Morality in Legal Reasoning: A Case Study of Lawrence V. Texas. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):241-251.
    Some recent commentators have acquiesced in the efforts of some religious groups to co-opt concepts of morality, thus leading many—inappropriately, I believe—to think we must keep all morality out of our civic life and especially out of the reasoning in our legal system. I review examples of the confusion in characterizing the 2003 Lawrence v. Texas decision as a conflict between constitutional rights and religious moral precepts. I argue that this approach capitulates to particular views of morality as religious morality. (...)
     
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  17. Julie C. van Camp (2007). How Religion Co-Opts Morality in Legal Reasoning. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):241-251.
    Some recent commentators have acquiesced in the efforts of some religious groups to co-opt concepts of morality, thus leading many—inappropriately, I believe—to think we must keep all morality out of our civic life and especially out of the reasoning in our legal system. I review examples of the confusion in characterizing the 2003 Lawrence v. Texas decision as a conflict between constitutional rights and religious moral precepts. I argue that this approach capitulates to particular views of morality as religious morality. (...)
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  18. Julie C. van Camp & Clifton Perry (2007). Symposium on Legal Reasoning. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2).
     
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  19. Julie Van Camp (2006). A Pragmatic Approach to the Identity of Works of Art. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (1):42-55.
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  20. Julie van Camp (2005). The Unbearable Erosion of Common Goods. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2).
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  21. Reviews by David Davies & Julie Van Camp (2004). Robert Stecker, Interpretation and Construction: Art, Speech, and the Law. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):291–296.
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  22. Julie C. Van Camp (2004). Colorization Revisited. Contemporary Aesthetics 2.
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  23. John Carriero, Michael Ferejohn, Michael Jubien, Philip Kain, Kwong-Loi Shun, David W. Smith, Michael Tye, Julie Van Camp & Georgia Warnke (2000). Richard Arneson University of California, San Diego Alison Leigh Brown Northern Arizona University. Philosophical Studies 99 (1).
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  24. Julie Van Camp (1996). Non-Verbal Metaphor: A Non-Explanation of Meaning in Dance. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (2):177-187.
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  25. Julie van Camp (1995). Book Review: Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):178-179.
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  26. Julie Van Camp (1995). The Colorization Controversy. Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (4):447-468.
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  27. Julie Van Camp, David D. Cooper, Bruce B. Suttle & Carl Elliott (1994). Book Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2).
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