Search results for 'Juliet Hooker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Juliet Hooker (2009). Race and the Politics of Solidarity. Oup Usa.score: 540.0
    Solidarity-the reciprocal relations of trust and obligation between citizens that are essential for a thriving polity-is a basic goal of all political communities. Yet it is extremely difficult to achieve, especially in multiracial societies. In an era of increasing global migration and democratization, that issue is more pressing than perhaps ever before. In the past few decades, racial diversity and the problems of justice that often accompany it have risen dramatically throughout the world. It features prominently nearly everywhere: from the (...)
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  2. Michael Hooker (1976). Page 86 a Mistake Concerning Conception/Hooker. In Stephen Francis Barker & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), Thomas Reid: Critical Interpretations. University City Science Center. 3--86.score: 180.0
     
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  3. Brad Hooker (1990). Rule-Consequentialism. Mind 99 (393):67-77.score: 60.0
    The theory of morality we can call full rule-consequentialism selects rules solely in terms of the goodness of their consequences and then claims that these rules determine which kinds of acts are morally wrong. George Berkeley was arguably the first rule-consequentialist. He wrote, “In framing the general laws of nature, it is granted we must be entirely guided by the public good of mankind, but not in the ordinary moral actions of our lives. … The rule is framed with respect (...)
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  4. Brad Hooker (2000). Ideal Code, Real World: A Rule-Consequentialist Theory of Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    What are the appropriate criteria for assessing a theory of morality? In this enlightening work, Brad Hooker begins by answering this question. He then argues for a rule-consequentialist theory which, in part, asserts that acts should be assessed morally in terms of impartially justified rules. In the end, he considers the implications of rule-consequentialism for several current controversies in practical ethics, making this clearly written, engaging book the best overall statement of this approach to ethics.
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  5. Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher (2008). Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.score: 60.0
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. The (...)
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  6. Brad Hooker (2008). Moral Particularism and the Real World. In Mark Norris Lance, Matjaž Potrč & Vojko Strahovnik (eds.), Challenging Moral Particularism. Routledge. 12--30.score: 60.0
    The term ‘moral particularism’ has been used to refer to different doctrines. The main body of this paper begins by identifying the most important doctrines associated with the term, at least as the term is used by Jonathan Dancy, on whose work I will focus. I then discuss whether holism in the theory of reasons supports moral particularism, and I call into question the thesis that particular judgements have epistemological priority over general principles. Dancy’s recent book Ethics without Principles (Dancy (...)
     
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  7. Brad Hooker (1991). Rule-Consequentialism and Demandingness: A Reply to Carson. Mind 100 (2):269-276.score: 60.0
    This paper replies to Carson's attacks on an earlier paper of Hooker's. Carson argued that rule-consequentialism--the theory that an act is morally right if and only if it is allowed by the set of rules and corresponding virtues the having of which by everyone would bring about the best consequences considered impartially--can and does require the comfortably off to make enormous sacrifices in order to help the needy. Hooker defends rule-consequentialism against Carson's arguments.
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  8. Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science I: Agency, Error, and the Interactive Exploration of Possibility Space in Early Ape-Langugae Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (1):87-124.score: 60.0
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper (Farrell and Hooker, b) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning (SDAL). The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape-language research. In this first paper we outline five prominent features of SDAL that will need to be realized in applying SDAL to science: 1) interactive exploration of possibility (...)
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  9. Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science II: Learning How to Learn Across a Revolution in Early Ape Language Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (2):222-255.score: 60.0
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper I (Farrell and Hooker, a) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning. The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape language research. Paper I examined the basic features of SDAL in relation to the early history of ape-language research. In this second paper we examine the reconceptualization of (...)
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  10. Wayne David Christensen & Cliff A. Hooker (2001). Self-Directed Agents. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):19-52.score: 60.0
    Wayne D. Christensen and Cliff A. Hooker.
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  11. Brad Hooker (2005). The Golden Rule. Think 4 (10):25-29.score: 60.0
    Should you always do unto others as you would have them do unto you? Brad Hooker investigates a seemingly plausible-looking moral principle: the Golden Rule.
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  12. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part III: Cross-Categorical Reduction. Dialogue 20 (03):496-529.score: 30.0
  13. C. A. Hooker (2002). Review of Robert W. Batterman, The Devil in the Details: Asymptotic Reasoning in Explanation, Reduction and Emergence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (10).score: 30.0
  14. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part II: Identity in Reduction. Dialogue 20 (02):201-236.score: 30.0
  15. Brad Hooker (2005). Fairness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):329 - 352.score: 30.0
    The main body of this paper assesses a leading recent theory of fairness, a theory put forward by John Broome. I discuss Broome's theory partly because of its prominence and partly because I think it points us in the right direction, even if it takes some missteps. In the course of discussing Broome's theory, I aim to cast light on the relation of fairness to consistency, equality, impartiality, desert, rights, and agreements. Indeed, before I start assessing Broome's theory, I discuss (...)
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  16. Brad Hooker (2002). The Collapse of Virtue Ethics. Utilitas 14 (01):22-.score: 30.0
    Virtue ethics is normally taken to be an alternative to consequentialist and Kantian moral theories. I shall discuss what I think is the most interesting version of virtue ethics – Rosalind Hursthouse's. I shall then argue that her version is inadequate in ways that suggest revision in the direction of a kind of rule-consequentialism.
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  17. Brad Hooker (1987). Williams' Argument Against External Reasons. Analysis 47 (1):42 - 44.score: 30.0
  18. James Griffin, Roger Crisp & Brad Hooker (eds.) (2000). Well-Being and Morality: Essays in Honour of James Griffin. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    An international line-up of fourteen distinguished philosophers presents new essays in honor of James Griffin, White's Professor of Moral Philosophy at Oxford University. The essays take up topics relating to well-being and morality, prominent themes in contemporary ethics and particularly in Griffin's work. Griffin himself provides replies to these essays, offering a fascinating development of his own thinking on these topics.
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  19. Brad Hooker (2010). When is Impartiality Morally Appropriate? In Brian Feltham & John Cottingham (eds.), Partiality and Impartiality: Morality, Special Relationships, and the Wider World. Oup Oxford.score: 30.0
    With respect to morality, the term ‘impartiality’ is used to refer to quite different things. My paper will focus on three: 1. Impartial application of good (first-order) moral rules 2. Impartial benevolence as the direct guide to decisions about what to do 3. Impartial assessment of (first-order) moral rules What are the relations among these three? Suppose there was just one good (first-order) moral rule, namely, that one should choose whatever one thinks will maximize aggregate good. If there were just (...)
     
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  20. Wayne D. Christensen & Clifford A. Hooker (1999). The Organization of Knowledge: Beyond Campbell's Evolutionary Epistemology. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):249.score: 30.0
    Donald Campbell has long advocated a naturalist epistemology based on a general selection theory, with the scope of knowledge restricted to vicarious adaptive processes. But being a vicariant is problematic because it involves an unexplained epistemic relation. We argue that this relation is to be explicated organizationally in terms of the regulation of behavior and internal state by the vicariant, but that Campbell's selectionist approach can give no satisfactory account of it because it is opaque to organization. We show how (...)
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  21. Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.) (2000). Moral Particularism. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    A timely and penetrating investigation, this book seeks to transform moral philosophy. In the face of continuing disagreement about which general moral principles are correct, there has been a resurgence of interest in the idea that correct moral judgements can be only about particular cases. This view--moral particularism--forecasts a revolution in ordinary moral practice that has until now consisted largely of appeals to general moral principles. Moral particularism also opposes the primary aim of most contemporary normative moral theory that attempts (...)
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  22. Brad Hooker, Promises and Rule-Consequentialism.score: 30.0
    The duty to keep promises has many aspects associated with deontological moral theories. The duty to keep promises is non-welfarist, in that the obligation to keep a promise need not be conditional on there being a net benefit from keeping the promise—indeed need not be conditional on there being at least someone who would benefit from its being kept. The duty to keep promises is more closely connected to autonomy than directly to welfare: agents have moral powers to give themselves (...)
     
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  23. Brad Hooker (2007). Rule-Consequentialism and Internal Consistency: A Reply to Card. Utilitas 19 (4):514-519.score: 30.0
    Rule-consequentialism has been accused of either collapsing into act-consequentialism or being internally inconsistent. I have tried to develop a form of rule-consequentialism without these flaws. In this June's issue of Utilitas, Robert Card argued that I have failed. Here I assess his arguments.
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  24. Brad Hooker (2010). Publicity in Morality: A Reply to Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. Ratio 23 (1):111-117.score: 30.0
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  25. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part I: Historical and Scientific Setting. Dialogue 20 (01):38-59.score: 30.0
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  26. Barry Hoffmaster & Cliff Hooker (2009). How Experience Confronts Ethics. Bioethics 23 (4):214-225.score: 30.0
    Analytic moral philosophy's strong divide between empirical and normative restricts facts to providing information for the application of norms and does not allow them to confront or challenge norms. So any genuine attempt to incorporate experience and empirical research into bioethics – to give the empirical more than the status of mere 'descriptive ethics'– must make a sharp break with the kind of analytic moral philosophy that has dominated contemporary bioethics. Examples from bioethics and science are used to illustrate the (...)
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  27. C. A. Hooker (1971). Energy and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):262 – 270.score: 30.0
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  28. Cliff A. Hooker (2006). Reduction as Cognitive Strategy. In Brian L. Keeley (ed.), Paul Churchland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
  29. C. A. Hooker (2004). Asymptotics, Reduction and Emergence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (3):435-479.score: 30.0
    All the major inter-theoretic relations of fundamental science are asymptotic ones, e.g. quantum theory as Planck's constant h 0, yielding (roughly) Newtonian mechanics. Thus asymptotics ultimately grounds claims about inter-theoretic explanation, reduction and emergence. This paper examines four recent, central claims by Batterman concerning asymptotics and reduction. While these claims are criticised, the discussion is used to develop an enriched, dynamically-based account of reduction and emergence, to show its capacity to illuminate the complex variety of inter-theory relationships in physics, and (...)
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  30. Brad Hooker (2003). The Demands of Consequentialism, by Tim Mulgan. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001, 313 Pp. + VI, ??35, $49.95 (Hbk). ISBN 0-1-825093-. [REVIEW] Philosophy 78 (2):289-307.score: 30.0
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  31. C. A. Hooker (1975). Book Review:Philosophical Problems of Space and Time Adolf Grunbaum. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 42 (3):334-.score: 30.0
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  32. C. A. Hooker (1981). Graham Nerlich: The Shape of Space. Dialogue 20 (04):783-798.score: 30.0
  33. Brad Hooker, The Demandingness Objection.score: 30.0
    This paper’s first section invokes a relevant meta-ethical principle about what a moral theory needs in order to be plausible and superior to its rivals. In subsequent sections, I try to pinpoint exactly what the demandingness objection has been taken to be. I try to explain how the demandingness objection developed in reaction to impartial act-consequentialism’s requirement of beneficence toward strangers. In zeroing in on the demandingness objection, I distinguish it from other, more or less closely related, objections. In particular, (...)
     
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  34. C. A. Hooker (1994). Regulatory Constructivism: On the Relation Between Evolutionary Epistemology and Piaget's Genetic Epistemology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):197-244.score: 30.0
    It is argued that fundamental to Piaget''s life works is a biologically based naturalism in which the living world is a nested complex of self-regulating, self-organising (constructing) adaptive systems. A structuralist-rationalist overlay on this core position is distinguished and it is shown how it may be excised without significant loss of content or insight. A new and richer conception of the nature of Piaget''s genetic epistemology emerges, one which enjoys rich interrelationships with evolutionary epistemology. These are explored and it is (...)
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  35. C. A. Hooker (1971). Sharp and the Refutation of the Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen Paradox. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):224-233.score: 30.0
    D. H. Sharp has recently argued that Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen failed to make good their claim that elementary quantum theory provides only an incomplete description of physical reality. Sharp expounds in detail three criticisms (a fourth is mentioned) which focus largely on formal features of the quantum theory. I argue, on grounds centered largely in our search for an adequate physical understanding of the micro domain, that each of these criticisms must be rejected. The original criticism of quantum theory (...)
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  36. Brad Hooker (1996). Ross-Style Pluralism Versus Rule-Consequentialism. Mind 105 (420):531-552.score: 30.0
    This paper employs (and defends where needed) a familiar four-part methodology for assessing moral theories. This methodology makes the most popular kind of moral pluralism--here called Ross-style pluralism--look extremely attractive. The paper contends, however, that, if rule-consequentialism's implications match our considered moral convictions as well as Ross-style pluralism's implications do, the methodology makes rule-consequentialism look even more attractive than Ross-style pluralism. The paper then attacks two arguments recently put forward in defence of Ross-style pluralism. One of these arguments is that (...)
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  37. Brad Hooker (2003). Contractualism, Spare Wheel, Aggregation. In Matt Matravers (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. Frank Cass. 53-76.score: 30.0
    This essay explores the reasons for thinking that Scanlon's contractualist principle serves merely as a ?spare wheel?, an element that spins along nicely but bears no real weight, because it presupposes too much of what it should be explaning. The ambitions and scope of Scanlon's contractualism are discussed, as is Scanlon's thesis that contracualism will assess candidate moral principles individually rather than as sets. The final third of the paper critizes Scanlon's account of fairness and his approach to cases where (...)
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  38. Brad Hooker (2001). Cudworth and Quinn. Analysis 61 (4):333–335.score: 30.0
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  39. C. A. Hooker (2009). Interaction and Bio-Cognitive Order. Synthese 166 (3):513 - 546.score: 30.0
    The role of interaction in learning is essential and profound: it must provide the means to solve open problems (those only vaguely specified in advance), but cannot be captured using our familiar formal cognitive tools. This presents an impasse to those confined to present formalisms; but interaction is fundamentally dynamical, not formal, and with its importance thus underlined it invites the development of a distinctively interactivist account of life and mind. This account is provided, from its roots in the interactivist (...)
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  40. C. A. Hooker (1991). Book Review:Philosophical Foundations of Quantum Field Theory Harvey R. Brown, Rom Harre. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (2):324-.score: 30.0
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  41. Cliff Hooker (1987). Book Review:The Quantum and Beyond W. M. Honig. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 54 (4):611-.score: 30.0
  42. C. A. Hooker, H. B. Penfold & R. J. Evans (1992). Control, Connectionism and Cognition: Towards a New Regulatory Paradigm. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (4):517-536.score: 30.0
  43. Brad Hooker (1996). Does Moral Virtue Constitute a Benefit to the Agent? In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should one Live? Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Theories of individual well‐being fall into three main categories: hedonism, the desire‐fulfilment theory, and the list theory (which maintains that there are some things that can benefit a person without increasing the person's pleasure or desire‐fulfilment). The paper briefly explains the answers that hedonism and the desire‐fulfilment theory give to the question of whether being virtuous constitutes a benefit to the agent. Most of the paper is about the list theory's answer.
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  44. Brad Hooker (1994). Is Rule-Consequentialism a Rubber Duck? Analysis 54 (2):92 - 97.score: 30.0
    Some things aren't what their names suggest. This is true of rubber ducks, stool pigeons, clay pigeons, hot dogs, and clothes horses. Frances Howard-Snyder's "Rule Consequentialism is a Rubber Duck" ("APQ", 30 (1993) 271-78) argues that the answer is Yes. Howard-Snyder thinks rule-consequentialism is a form of deontology, not a form of consequentialism. This thought is understandable: many recent definitions of consequentialism are such as to invite it. Thinking rule-consequentialism inferior to act-consequentialism, many philosophers, when discussing consequentialism, have had act-consequentialism (...)
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  45. J. C. Skewes & C. A. Hooker (2009). Bio-Agency and the Problem of Action. Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):283 - 300.score: 30.0
    The Aristotle-Kant tradition requires that autonomous activity must originate within the self and points toward a new type of causation (different from natural efficient causation) associated with teleology. Notoriously, it has so far proven impossible to uncover a workable model of causation satisfying these requirements without an increasingly unsatisfying appeal to extra-physical elements tailor-made for the purpose. In this paper we first provide the essential reason why the standard linear model of efficient causation cannot support the required model of agency: (...)
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  46. Brad Hooker (2000). Sidgwick and Common–Sense Morality. Utilitas 12 (03):347-.score: 30.0
    This paper begins by celebrating Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics. It then discusses Sidgwick's moral epistemology and in particular the coherentist element introduced by his argument from common-sense morality to utilitarianism. The paper moves on to a discussion of how common-sense morality seems more appealing if its principles are formulated as picking out pro tanto considerations rather than all-things-considered demands. Thefinal section of the paper considers the question of which version of utilitarianism follows from Sidgwick's arguments.
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  47. R. P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2009). Error, Error-Statistics and Self-Directed Anticipative Learning. Foundations of Science 14 (4):249-271.score: 30.0
    Error is protean, ubiquitous and crucial in scientific process. In this paper it is argued that understanding scientific process requires what is currently absent: an adaptable, context-sensitive functional role for error in science that naturally harnesses error identification and avoidance to positive, success-driven, science. This paper develops a new account of scientific process of this sort, error and success driving Self-Directed Anticipative Learning (SDAL) cycling, using a recent re-analysis of ape-language research as test example. The example shows the limitations of (...)
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  48. Paul K. Hooker (forthcoming). Isaiah 62:6–12. Interpretation 60 (4):438-441.score: 30.0
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  49. Brad Hooker (1998). Rule-Consequentialism and Obligations Toward the Needy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):19–33.score: 30.0
    Most of us believe morality requires us to help the desperately needy. But most of us also believe morality doesn't require us to make enormous sacrifices in order to help people who have no special connection with us. Such self-sacrifice is of course praiseworthy, but it isn't morally mandatory. Rule-consequentialism might seem to offer a plausible grounding for such beliefs. Tim Mulgan has recently argued in _Analysis and _Pacific Philosophical Quarterly that rule-consequentialism cannot do so. This paper replies to Mulgan's (...)
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  50. Morna D. Hooker (forthcoming). Book Review: Philippians and Philemon. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (3):346-347.score: 30.0
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