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Profile: Jung Lee (Northeastern University)
  1. Jung H. Lee (2013). An Ethics of Propriety: Ritual, Roles, and Dependence in Early Confucianism. Asian Philosophy 23 (2):153-165.
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  2. Jung H. Lee (2013). Comparative Religious Ethics and the Limits of Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4).
     
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  3. Jung H. Lee (2013). The Rhetoric Of Context. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):555-584.
    This paper presents a critical appraisal of the recent turn in comparative religious ethics to virtue theory; it argues that the specific aspirations of virtue ethicists to make ethics more contextual, interdisciplinary, and practice-centered has in large measure failed to match the rhetoric. I suggest that the focus on the category of the human and practices associated with self-formation along with a methodology grounded in “analogical imagination” has actually poeticized the subject matter into highly abstract textual studies on normative voices (...)
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  4. Jung H. Lee (2012). Van Norden, Bryan W. (Tr.), Mengzi: With Selections From Traditional Commentaries. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):409-413.
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  5. Jung H. Lee (2009). Review of Yong Huang (Ed.), Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  6. Jung H. Lee (2009). The Moral Power of Jim: A Mencian Reading of Huckleberry Finn. Asian Philosophy 19 (2):101 – 118.
    This paper examines the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the light of the early Confucian thinker Mencius, arguing in essence that Mencian theories of moral development and self-cultivation can help us to recover the moral significance of Twain's novel. Although 'ethical criticisms' of Huckleberry Finn share a long history, I argue that most interpretations have failed to appreciate the moral significance of Jim, either by focusing on the moral arc of Huck in isolation or by casting Jim in one-dimensional terms (...)
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  7. Jung H. Lee (2008). The Way of Poetic Influence: Revisioning the "Syncretist Chapters" of the Zhuangzi. Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 552-571.
    This essay examines the intra-poetic relationship between the "Inner Chapters" and the "Syncretist Chapters" of the Zhuangzi , exploring the affinities and tensions between the two competing works by analyzing not only how the Syncretist authors deliberately displace and recast the precursor poem by engaging in an act of creative revisionism, but also how the "Syncretist Chapters" unconsciously reveal a hidden debt to the "Inner Chapters," especially in regard to the practices of inner cultivation and a cosmology of the Dao. (...)
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  8. Jung H. Lee (2007). Preserving One's Nature: Primitivist Daoism and Human Rights. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):597-612.
  9. Jung H. Lee (2007). What is It Like to Be a Butterfly? A Philosophical Interpretation of Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):185 – 202.
    This paper attempts to recast Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream within the larger normative context of the 'Inner Chapters' and early Daoism in terms of its moral significance, particularly in the way that it prescribes how a Daoist should live through the 'significant symbol' of the butterfly. This normative reading of the passage will be contrasted with two recent interpretations of the passage - one by Robert Allinson and the other by Harold Roth - that tend to focus more on the epistemological (...)
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  10. Jung H. Lee (2000). Abraham in a Different Voice: Rereading "Fear and Trembling" with Care. Religious Studies 36 (4):377 - 400.
    This paper recasts the normative shape of "Fear and Trembling" by presenting an 'ethical reading' based on an ethic of care. It will be argued that Abraham's response represents a commitment to sustain and deepen his fundamental relationship with God, to make absolute his relation to the Absolute. Since most readers tend to focus myopically on 'the trial' itself, apart from the context and history of the God-relationship, the proffered interpretations tend inevitably to distort the nature and significance of Abraham's (...)
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  11. Jung H. Lee (1998). Disputers of the Tao: Putnam and Chuang-Tzu on Meaning, Truth, and Reality. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):447-470.
  12. Jung H. Lee (1998). Problems of Religious Pluralism: A Zen Critique of John Hick's Ontological Monomorphism. Philosophy East and West 48 (3):453-477.
    John Hick's "pluralistic hypothesis" of religion essays a comprehensive vision of religious diversity and its attendant soteriological, epistemological, and ontological implications. At the heart of Hick's proposal is the belief in the transcendental unity and soteriological identity of all religions. While coherent and compelling, Hick's model militates against those traditions that do not possess an ultimate noumenal referent that undergirds the phenomenal responses of culturally conditioned traditions. One of those traditions, namely Sōtō Zen Buddhism, at once defies Hick's categories and (...)
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