1. Jung-Yeup Kim (2014). Economic Equity, the Well-Field System, and Ritual Propriety in the Confucian Philosophy of Qi. Philosophy East and West 64 (4):856-865.
    The well-field system of land division was advocated by the classical Confucian Mencius and also by the Neo-Confucian Zhang Zai 張載 , both of whom, I argue, were philosophers of qi 氣 . In this system, land is divided into the shape of the Chinese character jing 井 . The outer eight parts would be private and cultivated by eight families, respectively, and the center part would be communal and fostered together in order to pay taxes.1 I argue that the (...)
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  2. Jung-Yeup Kim (2011). A Revisionist Understanding of Zhang Zai's Development of Qi in the Context of His Critique of the Buddhist. Asian Philosophy 20 (2):111-126.
    In a comprehensive survey of contemporary scholarship on Zhang Zai's (1020-1077) development of the notion qi ( 'vital energy') in the context of his critique of the Buddhist, I observe that there is a prevalent imposition of a Western concept, namely, 'substance monism', on his understanding of qi . It is assumed that he posits that 'the myriad things ( wanwu )' and 'the vast emptiness ( taixu )' are simultaneously differentiated and unified in that they are but different manifestations (...)
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  3. Jung-Yeup Kim (2008). The Philosophy of Qi: The Record of Great Doubts (Review). Philosophy East and West 58 (2):289-291.
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