Search results for 'Jussi Jylkk' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jussi Jylkk (2009). Psychological Essentialism and Semantic Externalism: Evidence for Externalism in Lay Speakers' Language Use. Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):37 – 60.score: 240.0
    Some experimental studies have recently claimed to undermine semantic externalism about natural kind terms. However, it is unclear how philosophical accounts of reference can be experimentally tested. We present two externalistic adaptations of psychological placeholder essentialism, a strict externalist and a hybrid externalist view, which are experimentally testable. We examine Braisby, Franks, and Hampton's (1996) study which claims to undermine externalism, and argue that the study fails in its aims. We conducted two experiments, the results of which undermine internalism and (...)
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  2. Fiona Woollard (2011). Essays on Derek Parfit's 'On What Matters'– Jussi Suikkanen and John Cottingham (Eds). Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):420-422.score: 15.0
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  3. A. J. Wilkie (1986). Review: J. B. Paris, L. Pacholski, J. Wierzejewski, A. J. Wilkie, A Hierarchy of Cuts in Models of Arithmetic; George Mills, A Tree Analysis of Unprovable Combinatorial Statements; Jussi Ketonen, Robert Solovay, Rapidly Growing Ramsey Functions. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (4):1062-1066.score: 15.0
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  4. Individual Right as Power (2010). Jussi varkemaa. In Virpi Mäkinen (ed.), The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 15.0
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  5. Caroline Bassett (2012). Jussi Parikka, Insect Media: An Archaeology of Animals and Technology. Radical Philosophy 173:52.score: 15.0
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  6. Carrie F. Klaus (forthcoming). Architecture and Sexual Identity: Jeanne de Jussie's Narrative of the Reformation of Geneva. Feminist Studies.score: 5.0
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  7. Daniel Cohnitz & Jussi Haukioja (2013). Meta-Externalism Vs Meta-Internalism in the Study of Reference. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):475-500.score: 3.0
    We distinguish and discuss two different accounts of the subject matter of theories of reference, meta-externalism and meta-internalism. We argue that a form of the meta- internalist view, “moderate meta-internalism”, is the most plausible account of the subject matter of theories of reference. In the second part of the paper we explain how this account also helps to answer the questions of what kind of concept reference is, and what role intuitions have in the study of the reference relation.
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  8. Jussi Jylkkä (2008). Concepts and Reference: Defending a Dual Theory of Natural Kind Concepts. Dissertation, University of Turkuscore: 3.0
    In this thesis I argue that the psychological study of concepts and categorisation, and the philosophical study of reference are deeply intertwined. I propose that semantic intuitions are a variety of categorisation judgements, determined by concepts, and that because of this, concepts determine reference. I defend a dual theory of natural kind concepts, according to which natural kind concepts have distinct semantic cores and non-semantic identification procedures. Drawing on psychological essentialism, I suggest that the cores consist of externalistic placeholder essence (...)
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  9. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Buck-Passing Accounts of Value. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):768-779.score: 3.0
    This paper explores the so-called buck-passing accounts of value. These views attempt to use normative notions, such as reasons and ought to explain evaluative notions, such as goodness and value . Thus, according to Scanlon's well-known view, the property of being good is the formal, higher-order property of having some more basic properties that provide reasons to have certain kind of valuing attitudes towards the objects. I begin by tracing some of the long history of such accounts. I then describe (...)
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  10. Jussi Suikkanen (2005). Reasons and Value – in Defence of the Buck-Passing Account. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):513 - 535.score: 3.0
    In this article, I will defend the so-called buck-passing theory of value. According to this theory, claims about the value of an object refer to the reason-providing properties of the object. The concept of value can thus be analyzed in terms of reasons and the properties of objects that provide them for us. Reasons in this context are considerations that count in favour of certain attitudes. There are four other possibilities of how the connection between reasons and value might be (...)
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  11. Jussi Haukioja (2012). Rigidity and Actuality-Dependence. Philosophical Studies 157 (3):399-410.score: 3.0
    It is generally assumed that rigidity plays a key role in explaining the necessary a posteriori status of identity statements, both between proper names and between natural kind terms. However, while the notion of rigid designation is well defined for singular terms, there is no generally accepted definition of what it is for a general term to be rigid. In this paper I argue that the most common view, according to which rigid general terms are the ones which designate the (...)
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  12. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). The Subjectivist Consequences of Expressivism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (3):364-387.score: 3.0
    Jackson and Pettit argue that expressivism in metaethics collapses into subjectivism. A sincere utterer of a moral claim must believe that she has certain attitudes to be expressed. The truth-conditions of that belief then allegedly provide truth-conditions also for the moral utterance. Thus, the expressivist cannot deny that moral claims have subjectivist truth-conditions. Critics have argued that this argument fails as stated. I try to show that expressivism does have subjectivist repercussions in a way that avoids the problems of the (...)
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  13. Mark Schroeder (2014). Does Expressivism Have Subjectivist Consequences? Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):278-290.score: 3.0
    Metaethical expressivists claim that we can explain what moral words like ‘wrong’ mean without having to know what they are about – but rather by saying what it is to think that something is wrong – namely, to disapprove of it. Given the close connection between expressivists’ theory of the meaning of moral words and our attitudes of approval and disapproval, expressivists have had a hard time shaking the intuitive charge that theirs is an objectionably subjectivist or mind-dependent view of (...)
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  14. Jussi Haukioja (2009). Intuitions, Externalism, and Conceptual Analysis. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):81-93.score: 3.0
    Semantic externalism about a class of expressions is often thought to make conceptual analysis about members of that class impossible. In particular, since externalism about natural kind terms makes the essences of natural kinds empirically discoverable, it seems that mere reflection on one's natural kind concept will not be able to tell one anything substantial about what it is for something to fall under one's natural kind concepts. Many hold the further view that one cannot even know anything substantial about (...)
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  15. Jussi Haukioja (2005). Is Solitary Rule-Following Possible? Philosophia 32 (1-4):131-154.score: 3.0
    The aim of this paper is to discover whether or not a solitary individual, a human being isolated from birth, could become a rule-follower. The argumentation against this possibility rests on the claim that such an isolate could not become aware of a normative standard, with which her actions could agree or disagree. As a consequence, theorists impressed by this argumentation adopt a view on which the normativity of rules arises from corrective practices in which agents engage in a community. (...)
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  16. Jussi Haukioja (2008). A Defence of the Conditional Analysis of Phenomenal Concepts. Philosophical Studies 139 (1):145 - 151.score: 3.0
    A recent strategy for defending physicalism about the mind against the zombie argument relies on the so-called conditional analysis of phenomenal concepts. According to this analysis, what kinds of states our phenomenal concepts refer to depends crucially on whether the actual world is merely physical or not. John Hawthorne, David Braddon-Mitchell and Robert Stalnaker have claimed, independently, that this analysis explains the conceivability of zombies in a way consistent with physicalism, thus blocking the zombie argument. Torin Alter has recently presented (...)
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  17. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Consequentialism, Constraints and The Good-Relative-To: A Reply to Mark Schroeder. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (March 2009):1-9.score: 3.0
    Recently, it has been a part of the so-called consequentializing project to attempt to construct versions of consequentialism that can support agent-relative moral constraints. Mark Schroeder has argued that such views are bound to fail because they cannot make sense of the agent relative value on which they need to rely. In this paper, I provide a fitting-attitude account of both agent-relative and agent-neutral values that can together be used to consequentialize agent-relative constraints.
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  18. Jussi Haukioja (2006). Semantic Externalism and A Priori Self-Knowledge. Ratio 19 (2):149-159.score: 3.0
    The argument known as the 'McKinsey Recipe' tries to establish the incompatibility of semantic externalism (about natural kind concepts in particular) and _a priori _self- knowledge about thoughts and concepts by deriving from the conjunction of these theses an absurd conclusion, such as that we could know _a priori _that water exists. One reply to this argument is to distinguish two different readings of 'natural kind concept': (i) a concept which _in fact _denotes a natural kind, and (ii) a concept (...)
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  19. Jussi Jylkkä, Henry Railo & Jussi Haukioja (2009). Psychological Essentialism and Semantic Externalism: Evidence for Externalism in Lay Speakers' Language Use. Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):37-60.score: 3.0
    Some experimental studies have recently claimed to undermine semantic externalism about natural kind terms. However, it is unclear how philosophical accounts of reference can be experimentally tested. We present two externalistic adaptations of psychological placeholder essentialism, a strict externalist and a hybrid externalist view, which are experimentally testable. We examine Braisby's et al. (1996) study which claims to undermine externalism, and argue that the study fails in its aims. We conducted two experiments, the results of which undermine internalism and the (...)
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  20. Jussi Haukioja (2004). Kripke's Finiteness Objection to Dispositionalist Theories of Meaning. In M. E. Reicher & J. C. Marek (eds.), Experience and Analysis: Papers of the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 3.0
    It is often thought that Blackburn and Boghossian have provided an effective reply to the finiteness objection to dispositional theories of meaning, presented by Kripke's Wittgenstein. In this paper I distinguish two possible readings of the sceptical demand for meaning-constitutive facts. The demand can be formulated in one of two ways: an A-question or a B-question. Any theory of meaning will give one of these explanatory priority over the other. I will then argue that the standard reply only works if (...)
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  21. Jussi Suikkanen (2007). T. M. Scanlon, What We Owe to Each Other. [REVIEW] Utilitas 19 (4):524-526.score: 3.0
    This paper is a short review of T.M. Scanlon's book What We Owe to Each Other. The book itself is already a philosophical classic. It defends a contractualist ethical theory but also has many interesting things to say about reasons, value, well-being, promises, relativism, and so on.
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  22. Jussi Haukioja (2007). A Sceptical Guide to Meaning and Rules: Defending Kripke's Wittgenstein – Martin Kusch. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):688–690.score: 3.0
  23. Jussi Haukioja (2006). Hindriks on Rule-Following. Philosophical Studies 126 (2):219-239.score: 3.0
    This paper is a reply to Frank Hindriks.
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  24. Jussi Suikkanen & John Cottingham (eds.) (2009). Essays on Derek Parfit's on What Matters. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 3.0
    In Essays on Derek Parfit's On What Matters, seven leading moral philosophers offer critical evaluations of the central ideas presented in a greatly anticipated new work by world-renowned moral philosopher Derek Parfit. Presents critical assessments of what promises to be one of the key moral philosophy texts of our time Features essays by a team of leading philosophers including Princeton's Michael Smith, one of the world's leading meta-ethicists Addresses Parfit's central thesis - that the main ethical theories can agree on (...)
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  25. Jussi Haukioja (2002). Soames and Zalabardo on Kripke's Wittgenstein. Grazer Philosophische Studien 64 (1):157-73.score: 3.0
    Two counterarguments, given by Scott Soames and Jos.
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  26. Jussi Jylkkä (2009). Why Fodor's Theory of Concepts Fails. Minds and Machines 19 (1):25-46.score: 3.0
    Fodor’s theory of concepts holds that the psychological capacities, beliefs or intentions which determine how we use concepts do not determine reference. Instead, causal relations of a specific kind between properties and our dispositions to token a concept are claimed to do so. Fodor does admit that there needs to be some psychological mechanisms mediating the property–concept tokening relations, but argues that they are purely accidental for reference. In contrast, I argue that the actual mechanisms that sustain the reference determining (...)
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  27. Jussi Suikkanen (2005). Contractualist Replies to the Redundancy Objections. Theoria 71 (1):38-58.score: 3.0
    This paper is a defence of T.M. Scanlon's contractualism - the view that an action is wrong if it is forbidden by the principles which no one could reasonably reject. Such theories have been argued to be redundant in two ways. They are claimed to assume antecedent moral facts to explain which principles could not be reasonably rejected, and the reasons they provide to follow the non-rejectable principles are said to be unnecessary given that we already have sufficient reasons not (...)
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  28. Jussi Jylkkä (2008). Theories of Natural Kind Term Reference and Empirical Psychology. Philosophical Studies 139 (2):153-169.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I argue that the causal and description theories of natural kind term reference involve certain psychological elements. My main goal is to refine these theories with the help of empirical psychology of concepts, and to argue that the refinement process ultimately leads to the dissolution of boundaries between the two kinds of theories. However, neither the refined theories nor any other existing theories provide an adequate answer to the question of what makes natural kind terms rigid. To (...)
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  29. Jussi Suikkanen (2012). Reason-Statements As Non-Extensional Contexts. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):592-613.score: 3.0
    Many believe that, if true, reason-statements of the form ‘that X is F is a reason to φ’ describe a ‘favouring-relation’ between the fact that X is F and the act of φing. This favouring-relation has been assumed to share many features of other, more concrete relations. This combination of views leads to immediate problems. Firstly, unlike statements about many other relations, reason-statements can be true even when the relata do not exist, i.e., when the relevant facts do not obtain (...)
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  30. Jussi Suikkanen (2008). A Dilemma for Rule-Consequentialism. Philosophia 36 (1):141-150.score: 3.0
    Rule-consequentialists tend to argue for their normative theory by claiming that their view matches our moral convictions just as well as a pluralist set of Rossian duties. As an additional advantage, rule-consequentialism offers a unifying justification for these duties. I challenge the first part of the rule-consequentialist argument and show that Rossian duties match our moral convictions better than the rule-consequentialist principles. I ask the rule-consequentialists a simple question. In the case that circumstances change, is the wrongness of acts determined (...)
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  31. Jussi Backman (2005). Divine and Mortal Motivation: On the Movement of Life in Aristotle and Heidegger. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):241-261.score: 3.0
    The paper discusses Heidegger's early notion of the “movedness of life” (Lebensbewegtheit) and its intimate connection with Aristotle's concept of movement (kinēsis). Heidegger's aim in the period of Being and Time was to “overcome” the Greek ideal of being as ousia – constant and complete presence and availability – by showing that the background for all meaningful presence is Dasein, the ecstatically temporal context of human being. Life as the event of finitude is characterized by an essential lack and incompleteness, (...)
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  32. Jussi Haukioja (2005). A Middle Position Between Meaning Finitism and Meaning Platonism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (1):35 – 51.score: 3.0
    David Bloor and Crispin Wright have argued, independently, that the proper lesson to draw from Wittgenstein's so-called rule-following considerations is the rejection of meaning Platonism. According to Platonism, the meaningfulness of a general term is constituted by its connection with an abstract entity, the (possibly) infinite extension of which is determined independently of our classificatory practices. Having rejected Platonism, both Bloor and Wright are driven to meaning finitism, the view that the question of whether a meaningful term correctly applies to (...)
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  33. Jussi Suikkanen (2006). Unprincipled Virtue – Nomy Arpaly. [REVIEW] Ratio 19 (2):261–265.score: 3.0
    This paper is a short book review of Nomy Arpaly's brilliant book Unprincipled Virtue.
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  34. Jussi Suikkanen (2007). Reasons and the Good – Roger Crisp. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):503–505.score: 3.0
    This paper is a short review of Roger Crisp's book Reasons and the Good.
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  35. Jussi Suikkanen (2011). Intentions, Blame, and Contractualism: A Review of T.M. Scanlon, Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 2 (2):561-573.score: 3.0
    This is a longer critical notice of T.M. Scanlon's book Moral Dimensions. The main crux of the article is to investigate how Scanlon's claims about the moral significance of intentions and reactive attitudes in this book fit with the earlier contractualist ethical theory which he presented in What We Owe to Each Other.
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  36. Jussi Suikkanen (2011). Review of John Kekes, The Human Condition. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).score: 3.0
    This article is a short review of John Kekes's book The Human Condition.
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  37. Daniel Cohnitz & Jussi Haukioja (forthcoming). Intuitions in Philosophical Semantics. Erkenntnis:1-25.score: 3.0
    We argue that the term “intuition”, as it is used in metaphilosophy, is ambiguous between at least four different senses. In philosophy of language, the relevant “intuitions” are either the outputs of our competence to interpret and produce linguistic expressions, or the speakers’ or hearers’ own reports of these outputs. The semantic facts that philosophers of language are interested in are determined by the outputs of our competence. Hence, philosophers of language should be interested in investigating these, and they do (...)
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  38. Jussi Haukioja (2006). Proto-Rigidity. Synthese 150 (2):155 - 169.score: 3.0
    What is it for a predicate or a general term to be a rigid designator? Two strategies for answering this question can be found in the literature, but both run into severe difficulties. In this paper, it is suggested that proper names and the usual examples of rigid predicates share a semantic feature which does the theoretical work usually attributed to rigidity. This feature cannot be equated with rigidity, but in the case of singular terms this feature entails their rigidity, (...)
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  39. Jussi Haukioja (2008). Rigid Kind Terms. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:55-61.score: 3.0
    Kripke argued, famously, that proper names are rigid designators. It is often assumed that some kind terms (most prominently natural kind terms) are rigid designators as well. This is thought to have significant theoretical consequences, such as the necessity of certain a posteriori identities involving natural kind terms. However, there is no agreement on what it is for a kind term to be rigid. In this paper I will first take a detailed look at the most common view: that rigid (...)
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  40. Jussi Jylkkä (2013). Natural Concepts, Phenomenal Concepts, and the Conceivability Argument. Erkenntnis 78 (3):647-663.score: 3.0
    The conceivability argument against materialism, originally raised by Saul Kripke and then reformulated, among others, by David Chalmers holds that we can conceive of the distinctness of a phenomenal state and its neural realiser, or, in Chalmers’ variation of the argument, a zombie world. Here I argue that both phenomenal and natural kind terms are ambiguous between two senses, phenomenal and natural, and that the conceivability argument goes through only on one reading of a term. Thus, the antimaterialist has to (...)
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  41. Jussi Suikkanen (2011). Parfit's Mountain. [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):102-103.score: 3.0
    This is a short review of Derek Parfit's On What Matters Volumes 1 and 2.
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  42. Jussi Suikkanen (2013). Thomas Hurka's Drawing Morals - Essays in Moral Theory, The Best Things in Life, and (Ed.) Underivative Duty - British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 33 (1):44-48.score: 3.0
    This is a review of three books by Thomas Hurka. The first one, Drawing Morals - Essays in Ethical Theory, is a collection of Hurka's previously published articles. The second one, The Best Things in Life, is a short book on happiness, pleasure and love intended for the general audience. Finally, the third book, Underivative Duty is a collection of articles edited by Hurka on British Moral Philosophers from Sidgwick to Ewing.
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  43. Jussi Haukioja (2007). How (Not) to Specify Normal Conditions for Response-Dependent Concepts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):325 – 331.score: 3.0
    The extensions of response-dependent concepts are a priori connected with the subjective responses that competent users of that concept have in normal conditions. There are two strategies for specifying normal conditions for response-dependent concepts: topic-specific and topic-neutral. On a topic-specific specification, a characterization of normal conditions would be given separately for each response-dependent concept (or a non-trivial subset of response-dependent concepts, such as our colour concepts), whereas a topic-neutral specification would be given in a uniform way for all response-dependent concepts. (...)
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  44. Jennifer Saul (2012). Maker's Knowledge or Perpetuator's Ignorance. Jurisprudence 2 (2):403-408.score: 3.0
    Intentions, Blame, and Contractualism: A review of Tim Scanlon, Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame by Jussi Suikkanen.
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  45. Jussi Suikkanen (2004). What We Owe to Many. Social Theory and Practice 30 (4):485-506.score: 3.0
    This article is an attempt to defend Scanlon's contractualism against the so-called aggregation problems. Scanlon's contractualism attempts to make sense of right and wrong in terms of principles which no one could reasonably reject. These principles are a function of what kind personal objections persons can make to alternative sets of moral principles. Because of this, it has been argued that contractualism is unable to account for how groups of different sizes are to be treated. In this article, I argue (...)
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  46. Jussi Haukioja (2001). Not so Quick: A Reply to Chambers. Mind 110 (439):699-702.score: 3.0
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  47. Timo Vuorisalo, Olli Arjamaa, Anti Vasemägi, Jussi-Pekka Taavitsainen, Auli Tourunen & Irma Saloniemi (2012). High Lactose Tolerance in North Europeans: A Result of Migration, Not In Situ Milk Consumption. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (2):163-174.score: 3.0
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  48. Jussi Backman (2012). Logocentrism and the Gathering Λόγος: Heidegger, Derrida, and the Contextual Centers of Meaning. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):67-91.score: 3.0
    Abstract Derrida's deconstructive strategy of reading texts can be understood as a way of highlighting the irreducible plurality of discursive meaning that undermines the traditional Western “logocentric“ desire for an absolute point of reference. While his notion of logocentrism was modeled on Heidegger's articulation of the traditional ontotheological framework of Aristotelian metaphysics, Derrida detects a logocentric remnant in Heidegger's own interpretation of gathering ( Versammlung ) as the basic movement of λόγος, discursiveness. However, I suggest that Derrida here touches upon (...)
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  49. Jussi Suikkanen (2014). Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 30 (1):103-116.score: 3.0
    This is a book review of Gerald Gaus's book The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World.
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  50. Jussi Jylkkä (2011). Hybrid Extensional Prototype Compositionality. Minds and Machines 21 (1):41-56.score: 3.0
    It has been argued that prototypes cannot compose, and that for this reason concepts cannot be prototypes (Osherson and Smith in Cognition 9:35–58, 1981; Fodor and Lepore in Cognition 58:253–270, 1996; Connolly et al. in Cognition 103:1–22, 2007). In this paper I examine the intensional and extensional approaches to prototype compositionality, arguing that neither succeeds in their present formulations. I then propose a hybrid extensional theory of prototype compositionality, according to which the extension of a complex concept is determined as (...)
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