Search results for 'Just war doctrine' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Justinas Žilinskas (2012). Just War” Doctrine and its Reflections in Our Times. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1201-1214.
    The present article discusses a well-known religious philosophical and partially legal doctrine of the “Just war”, developed in the Christian tradition by St. Augustine, St. Tomas Aquinas, Francisco de Vittoria, Francisco Suarez, Hugo Grotius and many other thinkers. The main thesis of the doctrine is that war will be just only if it corresponds to certain criteria, such as autoritas principi (waged by the sovereign), justa causa (on just aim) and with recta intentio (animus) or (...)
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  2.  50
    Henrik Syse (2010). The Platonic Roots of Just War Doctrine: A Reading of Plato’s Republic. Diametros 23:104-123.
    Plato arguably stands as one of the precursors to what we today know as the Just War Tradition, and he has more to say about ethics and the use of force than what is often acknowledged. In this article I try to show, by analyzing selected passages and perspectives from the Republic, that Plato regards the role of military ethics as crucial in the construction of the ideal city, and he sees limitation of brutality and more generally a philosophical (...)
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  3.  7
    Gregory M. Reichberg (2013). The Moral Equality of Combatants – a Doctrine in Classical Just War Theory? A Response to Graham Parsons. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (2):181 - 194.
    Contrary to what has been alleged, the moral equivalence of combatants (MEC) is not a doctrine that was expressly developed by the traditional theorists of just war. Working from the axiom that just cause is unilateral, they did not embrace a conception of public war that included MEC. Indeed, MEC was introduced in the early fifteenth century as a challenge to the then reigning just war paradigm. It does not follow, however, that the distinction between private (...)
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  4. Augustine Defines Just War (2006). " In Vain Have I Smitten Your Children". In R. Joseph Hoffmann (ed.), The Just War and Jihad. Prometheus Press
     
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  5.  4
    Colonel James Cook (2010). 'Cyberation' and Just War Doctrine: A Response to Randall Dipert. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):411-423.
    In this essay, I reject the suggestion that the just war tradition (JWT) does not apply to cyberwarfare (CW). That is not to say CW will not include grey areas defying easy analysis in terms of the JWT. But analogously ambiguous cases have long existed in warfare without undercutting the JWT's broad relevance. That some aspects of CW are unique is likewise no threat to the JWT's applicability. The special character of CW remains similar enough to other kinds of (...)
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  6.  44
    Joseph M. Schwartz (2004). Misreading Islamist Terrorism: The "War Against Terrorism" and Just-War Theory. Metaphilosophy 35 (3):273-302.
    : The Bush administration's military war on terrorism is a blunt, ineffective, and unjust response to the threat posed to innocent civilians by terrorism. Decentralized terrorist networks can only be effectively fought by international cooperation among police and intelligence agencies representing diverse nation‐states, including ones with predominantly Islamic populations. The Bush administration's allegations of a global Islamist terrorist threat to the national interests of the United States misread the decentralized and complex nature of Islamist politics. Undoubtedly there exists a “combat (...)
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  7. A. Canavero (2009). ""Popes and Peace: The" Just War" Doctrine and Humanitarian Intervention in the 20th Century. In Jost Dülffer & Robert Frank (eds.), Peace, War and Gender From Antiquity to the Present: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Klartext 97--113.
  8. Joseph Boyle (2003). Symposium: Responding to Terror. Just War Doctrine and the Military Response to Terrorism. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):153–170.
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  9. D. Attwood (1994). Paul Ramsey's Just - War Doctrine. Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):155-155.
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  10.  95
    J. T. Johnson (1994). Paul Ramsey's Just-War Doctrine. Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):152-154.
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  11. Joseph Boyle (2003). Just War Doctrine and the Military Response to Terrorism. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):153-170.
     
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  12. Thomas L. Pangle (1979). A Note on the Theoretical Foundation of the Just War Doctrine. The Thomist 43 (3):464.
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  13.  52
    N. Fotion (2007). War and Ethics: A New Just War Theory. Continuum.
    Introduction -- Just war theory -- Objections to just war theory -- Easy cases : Germany, Japan, Korea -- Harder cases : Serbia, Russia, Kosovo, Iraq -- Multiple reasons -- More problems with just war theory -- Prevention : Sri Lanka, Thailand -- Two just war theories -- Problems with just war theory I -- Problems for just war theory II -- Closing thoughts.
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  14.  27
    Andrew Fiala (2007). The Bush Doctrine, Democratization, and Humanitarian Intervention
    A Just War Critique.
    Theoria 54 (114):28-47.
  15. Jean Bethke Elshtain (ed.) (1992). Just War Theory. New York University Press.
    Available Again! Long before the "shock and awe" campaign against Iraq in March 2003, debates swarmed around the justifications of the U.S.-led war to depose Saddam Hussein. While George W. Bush's administration declared a just war of necessity, opponents charged that it was a war of choice, and even opportunism. Behind the rhetoric lie vital questions: when is war just, and what means are acceptable even in the course of a just war? Originally published in 1991, in (...)
     
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  16. Richard J. Regan (2013). Just War: Principles and Cases. Catholic University of America Press.
     
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  17. Howard Williams (2012). Kant and the End of War: A Critique of Just War Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  18. Duane L. Cady & Richard Werner (eds.) (1991). Just War, Nonviolence, and Nuclear Deterrence: Philosophers on War and Peace. Longwood Academic.
     
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  19.  19
    Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.) (2004). Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications.
    Introduction By Charles Randall Paul Thank you very much. Thank you very much Reverend Kowalski. I will now introduce our panel. I'll make my own remarks I ...
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  20.  57
    Wim Smit (ed.) (2005). Just War and Terrorism: The End of the Just War Concept? Peeters.
    With its interesting spectrum of viewpoints on some very actual and challenging themes, this book attempts to challenge the personal opinion of scholars and ...
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  21.  50
    Gregory M. Reichberg (2010). Thomas Aquinas Between Just War and Pacifism. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):219-241.
    Some recent authors have argued that Aquinas deliberately integrated a pacifist outlook into his just war theory. Others, by contrast, have maintained that his rejection of pacifism was unequivocal. The present article attempts to set the historical record straight by an examination of Aquinas's writings on this topic. In addition to Q. 40, A. 1 of Summa theologiae II–II, the text usually cited in this connection, this article considers the biblical commentaries where Aquinas explains how the Gospel “precepts of (...)
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  22. Jewish Holy War (2006). Who Broke Their Vow First? In R. Joseph Hoffmann (ed.), The Just War and Jihad. Prometheus Press
     
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  23. Uwe Steinhoff (2007). On the Ethics of War and Terrorism. Oxford University Press.
    In this book Uwe Steinhoff describes and explains the basic tenets of just war theory and gives a precise, succinct and highly critical account of its present status and of the most important and controversial current debates surrounding it. Rejecting certain in effect medieval assumptions of traditional just war theory and advancing a liberal outlook, Steinhoff argues that every single individual is a legitimate authority and has under certain circumstances the right to declare war on others or the (...)
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  24.  23
    Joseph Boyle (2012). Just War and Double Effect. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (2):61-71.
    Just war doctrine includes a stringent prohibition against killing and otherwise harming 'innocents', those of one's enemy population who are not engaged in the act of making war. This category includes most enemy civilians. The prohibition cannot reasonably prohibit all possible harms to these innocents. The doctrine of double effect is a way of limiting the prohibition to acts of intentionally harming innocents. This paper explores the application of double effect reasoning in this context, with a view (...)
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  25.  13
    A. Ferguson (2006). No Just War for the Empire. Radical Philosophy Today 2006:27-37.
    Although international law and the Charter of the United Nations define a doctrine of just war, some critics have argued that the U.S. has become an empire that can no longer be bound by such doctrine. On the contrary, I maintain that we must retain just war doctrine as a normative base from which to critique the U.S. and its preemptive wars against terrorism. Neither the Afghanistan nor the Iraq war has been a just (...)
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  26.  18
    Karsten J. Struhl (2006). Can There Be a Just War? Radical Philosophy Today 2006:3-25.
    Just war theory distinguishes between jus ad bellum (whether the war itself is just) and jus in bello (whether the conduct of the war is just). I argue, against the traditional view, that modern warfare has made it impossible to separate the two in practice. Specifically, I argue that modern war is a techno-cultural system which requires its participants to violate the primary criterion of jus in bello—noncombatant immunity. From this it follows that even a war of (...)
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  27.  3
    Daniel Schwartz (2013). Probabilism, Just War and Sovereing Supremacy in the Work of Gabriel Vazquez. History of Political Thought 34 (2):177-194.
    Proponents of probabilism argued that 'when an opinion is probable it may be followed even when the contrary opinion is more probable'. Gabriel Vazquez (1549-1604) was the first Jesuit theologian to defend and expand this doctrine. The prevalent theory of sovereignty at the time held that: (1) when sovereigns are victims of wrongs, they take on the role of international judges (thus just wars are just punishments); and (2) the sovereign need not stand before the judgment of (...)
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  28. Asa Kasher & Amos Yadlin (2006). Military Ethics of Fighting Terror: Principles. Philosophia 34 (1):75-84.
    The purpose of the present document is to briefly present principles that constitute a new doctrine within the sphere of Military Ethics : The Just War Doctrine of Fighting Terror.The doctrine has been developed by a team we have headed at the Israel Defense Force College of National Defense. However, the work has been done on the general levels of moral, ethical and legal considerations that should guide a democratic state when it faces terrorist activities committed (...)
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  29. Helen Frowe (2011). The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction. Routledge.

    When is it right to go to war? When is a war illegal? What are the rules of engagement? What should happen when a war is over? How should we view terrorism?

    The Ethics of War and Peace is a fresh and contemporary introduction to one of the oldest but still most relevant ethical debates. It introduces students to contemporary Just War Theory in a stimulating and engaging way, perfect for those approaching the topic for the first time.

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  30. Alex J. Bellamy (2006). Just Wars: From Cicero to Iraq. Polity Press.
    In what circumstances is it legitimate to use force? How should force be used? These are two of the most crucial questions confronting world politics today. The Just War tradition provides a set of criteria which political leaders and soldiers use to defend and rationalize war. This book explores the evolution of thinking about just wars and examines its role in shaping contemporary judgements about the use of force, from grand strategic issues of whether states have a right (...)
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  31.  59
    A. J. Coates (1997). The Ethics of War. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    Drawing on examples from the history of warfare from the crusades to the present day, "The ethics of war" explores the limits and possibilities of the moral regulation of war. While resisting the commonly held view that 'war is hell', A.J. Coates focuses on the tensions which exist between war and morality. The argument is conducted from a just war standpoint, though the moral ambiguity and mixed record of that tradition is acknowledge and the dangers which an exaggerated view (...)
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  32.  29
    Steven Lee (2012). Ethics and War: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    What are the ethical principles underpinning the idea of a just war and how should they be adapted to changing social and military circumstances? In this book, Steven P. Lee presents the basic principles of just war theory, showing how they evolved historically and how they are applied today in global relations. He examines the role of state sovereignty and individual human rights in the moral foundations of just war theory and discusses a wide range of topics (...)
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  33.  30
    Torkel Brekke (ed.) (2006). The Ethics of War in Asian Civilizations: A Comparative Perspective. Routledge.
    This study of the comparative ethics of war seeks to open a discussion about whether there are universal standards in the ideologies of warfare between the major religious traditions of the world. The project looks at the ideology of war in the major Asian religious traditions. Does our exploration of the ethics of war in Asian civilizations have any bearing on the pressing questions of armed conflict today? It has become clear that Islamic ethics and law contain sophisticated concepts of (...)
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  34.  16
    Daryl Glaser (2011). Can the Doctrine of Just Military Intervention Survive Iraq? Journal of Global Ethics 6 (3):287-304.
    The disastrous consequences of the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 appear to discredit just war theories that justify military intervention in sovereign states in the name of human rights. It is possible, however, to identify factors that distinguish a defensible military intervention from the kind pursued in Iraq, and to incorporate these into a doctrine of humanitarian military intervention that would not have permitted the Iraq invasion. This improved doctrine stands in contrast to the militant interventionist (...)
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  35.  26
    Michael Skerker (2004). Just War Criteria and the New Face of War: Human Shields, Manufactured Martyrs, and Little Boys with Stones. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (1):27-39.
    This article applies jus in bello criteria to a relatively novel tactic in asymmetrical warfare: the attempt by a conventionally weaker force to shape the conditions of combat so that the (morally scrupulous) stronger force cannot advance without violating the rules of war. The weaker side accomplishes this by placing its own civilian population before the attacking force: by encouraging or forcing civilians to be human shields, by launching attacks from civilian areas, by provoking reprisal massacres, by creating humanitarian disasters, (...)
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  36. Thomas W. Simpson & Vincent C. Müller (forthcoming). Just War and Robots’ Killings. Philosophical Quarterly:pqv075.
    May lethal autonomous weapons systems—‘killer robots ’—be used in war? The majority of writers argue against their use, and those who have argued in favour have done so on a consequentialist basis. We defend the moral permissibility of killer robots, but on the basis of the non-aggregative structure of right assumed by Just War theory. This is necessary because the most important argument against killer robots, the responsibility trilemma proposed by Rob Sparrow, makes the same assumptions. We show that (...)
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  37.  38
    John Kelsay (1993). Islam and War: A Study in Comparative Ethics. Westminster/John Knox Press.
    This book explores these questions and addresses the lack of comparative perspectives on the ethics of war, particularly with respect to Islam.
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  38. Martin Shaw (2005). The New Western Way of War: Risk-Transfer War and its Crisis in Iraq. Polity.
    The new western way of war from Vietnam in Iraq -- Theories of the new western way of war -- The global surveillance mode of warfare -- Rules of risk-transfer war -- Iraq: risk economy of a war -- A way of war in crisis.
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  39. Yigal Levin & Amnon Shapira (eds.) (2011). War and Peace in Jewish Tradition: From the Biblical World to the Present. Routledge.
    War and peace in the Bible -- Theoretical aspects of war in rabbinic thought -- War and peace in modern Jewish thought and practice -- Israel, war, ethics and the media.
     
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  40. Yigal Levin & Amnon Shapira (eds.) (2012). War and Peace in Jewish Tradition: From the Biblical World to the Present: The Third Annual Conference of the Israel Heritage Department Ariel, Israel. Routledge.
    War and peace in the Bible -- Theoretical aspects of war in rabbinic thought -- War and peace in modern Jewish thought and practice -- Israel, war, ethics and the media.
     
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  41.  15
    Steven Metz & Phillip R. Cuccia (eds.) (2011). Defining War for the 21st Century. Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College.
    Introduction -- The meaning of war -- The historical context -- How do we know that we are at war? -- How do we know when a war is over? -- National security strategy and tactical art -- Who participates in war? -- What rules govern war? -- Why does it matter? -- The way ahead.
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  42.  77
    Paul Richard Daniels (2015). Just War and Non-Combatants in the Private Military Industry. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):146-161.
    I argue that, according to Just War Theory, those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry can be permissibly harmed while at work by enemy combatants. That is, for better or worse, a Just War theorist should consider all those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry either: (i) individuals who may be permissibly restrained with lethal force while at work, or (ii) individuals who may be harmed by permissible attacks against their (...)
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  43.  36
    Leonard Kahn (2013). Just War Theory and Cyber-Attacks. In Fritz Alhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Not Just Wars. Routledge
    In this chapter, I take up the question of whether one of the central principles of jus ad bellum – just cause – is relevant in a world in which cyberattacks occur. I argue that this principle is just as relevant as ever, though it needs modification in light of recent developments. In particular, I argue, contrary to many traditional just war theorists, that just cause should not be limited to physical attacks. In the process, I (...)
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  44. Aleksandar Jokic (2012). What's A Just War Theorist? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology 4 (2):91-114.
    The article provides an account of the unlikely revival of the medieval Just War Theory, due in large part to the efforts of Michael Walzer. Its purpose is to address the question: What is a just war theorist? By exploring contrasts between scholarly activity and forms of international activism, the paper argues that just war theorists appear to be just war criminals, both on the count of aiding and abetting aggression and on the count of inciting (...)
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  45.  61
    Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Non-Combatant Immunity and War-Profiteering. In Helen Frowe & Lazar Seth (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War. Oxford University Press
    The principle of noncombatant immunity prohibits warring parties from intentionally targeting noncombatants. I explicate the moral version of this view and its criticisms by reductive individualists; they argue that certain civilians on the unjust side are morally liable to be lethally targeted to forestall substantial contributions to that war. I then argue that reductivists are mistaken in thinking that causally contributing to an unjust war is a necessary condition for moral liability. Certain noncontributing civilians—notably, war-profiteers—can be morally liable to be (...)
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  46. John W. Lango (2005). Preventive Wars, Just War Principles, and the United Nations. Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):247 - 268.
    This paper explores the question of whether the United Nations should engage in preventive military actions. Correlatively, it asks whether UN preventive military actions could satisfy just war principles. Rather than from the standpoint of the individual nation state, the ethics of preventive war is discussed from the standpoint of the UN. For the sake of brevity, only the legitimate authority, just cause, last resort, and proportionality principles are considered. Since there has been disagreement about the specific content (...)
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  47.  32
    Jonathan Parry (2015). Just War Theory, Legitimate Authority, and Irregular Belligerency. Philosophia 43 (1):175-196.
    Since its earliest incarnations, just war theory has included the requirement that war must be initiated and waged by a legitimate authority. However, while recent years have witnessed a remarkable resurgence in interest in just war theory, the authority criterion is largely absent from contemporary discussions. In this paper I aim to show that this is an oversight worth rectifying, by arguing that the authority criterion plays a much more important role within just war theorising than is (...)
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  48. Igor Primoratz (2002). Michael Walzer's Just War Theory: Some Issues of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):221-243.
    In his widely influential statement of just war theory, Michael Walzer exempts conscripted soldiers from all responsibility for taking part in war, whether just or unjust (the thesis of the moral equality of soldiers). He endows the overwhelming majority of civilians with almost absolute immunity from military attack on the ground that they aren't responsible for the war their country is waging, whether just or unjust. I argue that Walzer is much too lenient on both soldiers and (...)
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  49. Christopher Toner (2010). The Logical Structure of Just War Theory. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):81-102.
    A survey of just war theory literature reveals the existence of quite different lists of principles. This apparent arbitrariness raises a number of questions: What is the relation between ad bellum and in bello principles? Why are there so many of the former and so few of the latter? What order is there among the various principles? To answer these questions, I first draw on some recent work by Jeff McMahan to show that ad bellum and in bello principles (...)
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  50.  45
    Cheyney Ryan (2013). Pacifism, Just War, and Self-Defense. Philosophia 41 (4):1-29.
    This essay distinguishes two main forms of pacifism, personal pacifism and political pacifism. It then contrasts the views on self-defense of political pacifism and just war theory, paying special attention to notions of the state and sovereignty.
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