Search results for 'Justice Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Aleksander Peczenik & Mikael M. Karlsson (eds.) (1995). Law, Justice and the State: Essays on Justice and Rights: Proceedings of the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (Ivr), Reykjavík, 26 May-2 June, 1993. [REVIEW] F. Steiner Verlag.score: 120.0
  2. K. D. Irani & Morris Silver (eds.) (1995). Social Justice in the Ancient World. Greenwood Press.score: 96.0
    This edited collection focuses on the problem of social justice, or, more particularly, how the demand for social justice was articulated and implemented in ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. C. L. Buchanan & E. W. Prior (eds.) (1985). Medical Care and Markets: Conflicts Between Efficiency and Justice. Centre of Policy Studies, Monash University.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Lars O. Ericsson, Harald Ofstad & Giuliano Pontara (eds.) (1980/1981). Justice, Social, and Global: Papers Presented at the Stockholm International Symposium on Justice, Held in September 1978. Akademilitteratur.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Walter P. Krolikowski (ed.) (1982). Faith and Justice. Loyola University Press.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Melvin J. Lerner & Michael Ross (eds.) (1974). The Quest for Justice: Myth, Reality, Ideal: Proceedings of a Conference Held at the University of Waterloo, May, 1972. Holt, Rinehart and Winston of Canada.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jon Elster & John E. Roemer (eds.) (1991). Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this volume a diverse group of economists, philosophers, political scientists, and psychologists address the problems, principles, and practices involved in comparing the well-being of different individuals. A series of questions lie at the heart of this investigation: What is the relevant concept of well-being for the purposes of comparison? How could the comparisons be carried out for policy purposes? How are such comparisons made now? How do the difficulties involved in these comparisons affect the status of utilitarian theories? This (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Werner Maihofer & Gerhard Sprenger (eds.) (1900). Praktische Vernunft Und Theorien Der Gerechtigkeit: Xv. Weltkongress Der Internationalen Vereinigung für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie, Göttingen, 18. Bis 24. August 1991. [REVIEW] F. Steiner.score: 60.0
    Vihjanen: Institutional Mercy u S. Harwood: Is Mercy Unjust? u K. Tuori: Critical Positivism and the Problem of the Legitimacy of Law u K. Sevon: The Practical ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. André Laks & Malcolm Schofield (eds.) (1995). Justice and Generosity: Studies in Hellenistic Social and Political Philosophy: Proceedings of the Sixth Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    Hegel's often-echoed verdict on the apolitical character of philosophy in the Hellenistic age is challenged in this collection of new essays, originally presented at the sixth meeting of the Symposium Hellenisticum. An international team of leading scholars reveals a vigorous intellectual scene of great diversity: analyses of political leadership and the Roman constitution in Aristotelian terms; Cynic repudiation of the polis - but accommodation with its rulers; Stoic and Epicurean theories of justice as the foundation of society; Cicero's moral (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. Roland Pennock & John William Chapman (eds.) (1985). Criminal Justice. New York University Press.score: 48.0
    This, the twenty-seventh volume in the annual series of publications by the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy, features a number of distinguised contributors addressing the topic of criminal justice. Part I considers "The Moral and Metaphysical Sources of the Criminal Law," with contributions by Michael S. Moore, Lawrence Rosen, and Martin Shapiro. The four chapters in Part II all relate, more or less directly, to the issue of retribution, with papers by Hugo Adam Bedau, Michael Davis, Jeffrie (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska Carl (2011). Responsibility and Distributive Justice: An Introduction. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    This introductory chapter provides an overview of the recent debate about responsibility and distributive justice. It traces the recent philosophical focus on distributive justice to John Rawls and examines two arguments in his work which might be taken to contain the seeds of the focus on responsibility in later theories of distributive justice. It examines Ronald Dworkin's ‘equality of resources’, the ‘luck egalitarianism’ of Richard Arneson and G. A. Cohen, as well as the criticisms of their work (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.) (2011). Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Under what conditions are people responsible for their choices and the outcomes of those choices? How could such conditions be fostered by liberal societies? Should what people are due as a matter of justice depend on what they are responsible for? For example, how far should healthcare provision depend on patients' past choices? What values would be realized and which hampered by making justice sensitive to responsibility? Would it give people what they deserve? Would it advance or hinder (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Lisa Fuller (forthcoming). International NGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect & Procedural Justice. In E. Emanuel J. Millum (ed.), Global Justice and Bioethics. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Many people in the developing world access essential health services either partially or primarily through programs run by international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). Given that such programs are typically designed and run by Westerners, and funded by Western countries and their citizens, it is not surprising that such programs are regarded by many as vehicles for Western cultural imperialism. In this chapter, I consider this phenomenon as it emerges in the context of development and humanitarian aid programs, particularly those delivering medical (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Nancy Fraser (2007). Feminist Politics in the Age of Recognition: A Two-Dimensional Approach to Gender Justice. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):23-35.score: 27.0
    In the course of the last thirty years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively “post-Marxist”culture- and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double-edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity, and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving to less to enrich struggles for redistribution than to displace (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Liza Mügge (2012). Women in Transnational Migrant Activism: Supporting Social Justice Claims of Homeland Political Organizations. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):65-81.score: 27.0
    This article studies the conceptions of social justice of women active in transnational migrant politics over a period of roughly 20 years in the Netherlands. The novel focus on migrant women reveals that transnational politics is almost completely male-dominated and -directed. Two of the exceptions found in this article include a leftist and a Kurdish women organization supporting the communist cause in the 1980s and the Kurdish struggle in the 1990s in Turkey, respectively. In both organizations gender equality was (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rosemary Foot, John Lewis Gaddis & Andrew Hurrell (eds.) (2003). Order and Justice in International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    The relationship between international order and justice has long been central to the study and practice of international relations. For most of the twentieth century, states and international society gave priority to a view of order that focused on the minimum conditions for coexistence in a pluralist, conflictual world. Justice was seen either as secondary or sometimes even as a challenge to order. Recent developments have forced a reassessment of this position. This book sets current concerns within a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Andrew Gibson (2009). Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):102-118.score: 27.0
    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, is subject to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matt Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in the History of Political and Social Thought: Finding A Fair Share. Routledge.score: 27.0
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Aziz Choudry (2012). Struggles Against Bilateral FTAs: Challenges for Transnational Global Justice Activism. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):7-25.score: 27.0
    The past decade has seen major movements and mobilizations against the new crop of bilateral free trade and investment agreements being pursued by governments in the wake of the failure of global (World Trade Organization) and regional (e.g. Free Trade Area of the Americas) negotiations, and the defeat of an attempted Multilateral Agreement on Investment in the 1990s. However, in spite of much scholarly, non-governmental organization (NGO) and activist focus on transnational global justice activism, many of these movements, such (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jessica Shaw (2012). Full-Spectrum Reproductive Justice: The Affinity of Abortion Rights and Birth Activism. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):143-159.score: 27.0
    This paper argues that not only is there a relationship between birth activism and abortion activism, but that if empowering women is the goal, the two cannot be separated. By understanding how women's bodies have been controlled and their reproductive lives appropriated, the current pro-choice and birth activist frameworks that are used to advocate for women can no longer be understood to address women’s needs. It is by working through the framework of full-spectrum reproductive justice that women may become (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Janine M. Brodie (2007). Reforming Social Justice in Neoliberal Times. Studies in Social Justice 1 (2):93-107.score: 27.0
    This article unfolds in three stages. First, it locates the emergence of modern conceptions of social justice in industrializing Europe, and especially in the discovery of the “social,” which provided a particular idiom for the liberal democratic politics for most of the twentieth century. Second, the article links this particular conception of the social to the political rationalities of the postwar welfare state and the identity of the social citizen. Finally, the article discusses the myriad ways in which this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Dejan Guzina & Branka Marijan (2013). Local Uses of International Criminal Justice in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Transcending Divisions or Building Parallel Worlds? Studies in Social Justice 7 (2):245-263.score: 27.0
    Transitionaljustice mechanisms and the International Criminal Tribunal for the FormerYugoslavia (ICTY) have had only a limited success in overcoming ethnic divisionsin Bosnia-Herzegovina. Rather than elaborating upon the role of local politicalelites in perpetuating ethnic divisions, we examine ordinary peoples’ popularperceptions of war and its aftermath. In our view, the idea that elites havecomplete control over the broader narratives about the past is misplaced. Weargue that transitional justice and peace mechanisms supported by externalactors are always interpreted on the ground in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Gary Craig (2007). Social Justice in a Multicultural Society: Experience From the UK. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):93-108.score: 27.0
    Social justice is a contested concept. For example, some on the left argue for equality of outcomes, those on the right for equality of opportunities, and there are differing emphases on the roles of state, market and individual in achieving a socially just society. These differences in emphasis are critical when it comes to examining the impact that public policy has on minority ethnic groups. Social justice should not be culture-blind any more than it can be gender-blind yet (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Doris Marie Provine (2009). Justice as Told by Judges: The Case of Litigation Over Local Anti-Immigrant Legislation. Studies in Social Justice 3 (2):231-245.score: 27.0
    In the absence of comprehensive immigration reform at the federal level, many American states and localities are undertaking their own legal reforms. The new state and local laws have been challenged by immigrant-rights organizations and individuals on the grounds that the federal government has already pre-empted the field. The lawsuits bring a new narrative voice—that of judges—into the boiling U.S. immigration debate. Judges engage the controversy over local enforcement of immigration enforcement, as they have other contentious disputes, both as pragmatic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Leah Briones (2011). Rights with Capabilities: Towards a Social Justice Framework for Migrant Activism. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):127-143.score: 27.0
    The paradigm of rights, established throughout the academic, policy and migrant activism arenas, governs the protection of vulnerable migrant workers against abuse. To what extent this approach has achieved social justice for the migrant worker in the current global political economy climate is, however, uncertain. In analyzing the use of rights in migrant activism in Hong Kong, this paper shows the limitation of rights in the migrant experience at the same time as it shows how a new paradigm based (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Collins (2010). Between Acceleration and Occupation: Palestine and the Struggle for Global Justice. Studies in Social Justice 4 (2):199-215.score: 27.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This article explores the contemporary politics of global violence through an examination of the particular challenges and possibilities facing Palestinians who seek to defend their communities against an ongoing settler-colonial project (Zionism) that is approaching a crisis point. As the colonial dynamic in Israel/Palestine returns to its most elemental level – land, trees, homes – it also continues to be a laboratory for new forms of accelerated violence whose global impact is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Life Value, the Civil Commons and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):11-61.score: 27.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Understanding Life Value, the Civil Commons, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):2011.score: 27.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Marina Morrow & Julia Weisser (2012). Towards a Social Justice Framework of Mental Health Recovery. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):27-43.score: 27.0
    In this paper we set out the context in which experiences of mental distress occur with an emphasis on the contributions of social and structural factors and then make a case for the use of intersectionality as an analytic and methodological framework for understanding these factors. We then turn to the political urgency for taking up the concept of recovery and argue for the importance of research and practice that addresses professional domination of the field, and that promotes ongoing engagement (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael Reisch (2007). Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Persistent Tensions in the History of US Social Welfare and Social Work. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):67-92.score: 27.0
    Social justice has been a central normative component of U.S. social welfare and social work for over a century, although the meaning and implications of the term have often been ambiguous. A major source of this ambiguity lies in the conflict between universalist views of social justice and those which focus on achieving justice for specific groups. This conflict has been masked by several long-standing assumptions about the relationship between social justice and multiculturalism – assumptions which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Shannon Drysdale Walsh (2009). Engendering Justice: Constructing Institutions to Address Violence Against Women. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):48-66.score: 27.0
    This paper addresses how states improve their responsiveness to violence against women in developing countries with little political will and few resources to do so. One key to engendering justice and improving responsiveness is building specialized institutions within the state that facilitate the implementation of laws addressing violence against women. Why and how do states engage in institution-building to protect marginalized populations in these contexts? I propose that developing countries are more likely to create and maintain specialized institutions when (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Lynne Tirrell (forthcoming). “Transitional Justice in Post-Genocide Rwanda: An Integrative Approach”. In Claudio Corradetti, Nir Eisikovits & Jack Rotondi (eds.), Theorizing Transitional Justice. Ashgate.score: 27.0
    An imperfect “politics of justice” seems to be inevitable in the aftermath of genocide. In Rwanda, this is especially true, given the scale of the atrocities, the breadth of participation, and the need to build a justice system from scratch while establishing security and restoring the rule of law. Official contexts for survivor testimony and corresponding perpetrator punishment are crucial for establishing shared norms and narratives, but these processes can destabilize social relations in important ways. Accordingly, without development, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Charles R. Beitz (2005). Cosmopolitanism and Global Justice. Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):11 - 27.score: 24.0
    Philosophical attention to problems about global justice is flourishing in a way it has not in any time in memory. This paper considers some reasons for the rise of interest in the subject and reflects on some dilemmas about the meaning of the idea of the cosmopolitan in reasoning about social institutions, concentrating on the two principal dimensions of global justice, the economic and the political.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Pablo Gilabert (2006). Basic Positive Duties of Justice and Narveson's Libertarian Challenge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):193-216.score: 24.0
    Are positive duties to help others in need mere informal duties of virtue or can they also be enforceable duties of justice? In this paper I defend the claim that some positive duties (which I call basic positive duties) can be duties of justice against one of the most important prin- cipled objections to it. This is the libertarian challenge, according to which only negative duties to avoid harming others can be duties of justice, whereas positive duties (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pablo Gilabert (2012). Comparative Assessments of Justice, Political Feasibility, and Ideal Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):39-56.score: 24.0
    What should our theorizing about social justice aim at? Many political philosophers think that a crucial goal is to identify a perfectly just society. Amartya Sen disagrees. In The Idea of Justice, he argues that the proper goal of an inquiry about justice is to undertake comparative assessments of feasible social scenarios in order to identify reforms that involve justice-enhancement, or injustice-reduction, even if the results fall short of perfect justice. Sen calls this the “comparative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Hans Kelsen (1957/2000). What is Justice?: Justice, Law, and Politics in the Mirror of Science: Collected Essays. Lawbook Exchange.score: 24.0
    What is justice? -- The idea of justice in the Holy Scriptures -- Platonic justice -- Aristotle's doctrine of justice -- The natural-law doctrine before the tribunal of science -- A "dynamic" theory of natural law -- Absolutism and relativism in philosophy and politics -- Value judgments in the science of law -- The law as a specific social technique -- Why should the law be obeyed? -- The pure theory of the law and analytical jurisprudence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Evan Riley (2011). Against Sen Against Rawls On Justice. Indian Journal of Human Development 5 (1):211-221.score: 24.0
    Amartya Sen has recently leveled a series of what he alleges to be quite serious very general objections against Rawls, Rawlsian fellow travelers, and other social contract accounts of justice. In The Idea of Justice, published in 2009, Sen specifically charges his target philosophical views with what calls transcendentalism, procedural parochialism, and with being mistakenly narrowly focused on institutions. He also thinks there is a basic incoherence—arising from a version of Derek Parfit’s Identity Problem—internal to the Rawslian theoretical (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity. British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.score: 24.0
    There are many interesting questions to ask about cosmopolitan arguments. Is it true that the sphere of moral concern is global? Which sets of actions would realize the outcomes of global justice that cosmopolitans seek? Are those sets of actions feasible, and when we compare them against each other, which is the most feasible? The question I want to focus on in this paper is a question of the latter kind, but I want to take a slightly unique approach (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael J. Sandel (ed.) (2007). Justice: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction : doing the right thing -- Utilitarianism -- Libertarianism -- Locke : property rights -- Markets and morals : surrogate motherhood, military service -- Kant : freedom as autonomy -- Rawls : justice as fairness -- Distributive justice : equality, entitlement, and merit -- Affirmative action : reverse discrimination? -- Aristotle : justice and virtue -- Ability, disability, and discrimination : cheerleaders and golf carts -- Justice, community, and membership -- Moral argument and liberal toleration (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Aaron Maltais (2008). Global Warming and Our Natural Duties of Justice. Dissertation, Uppsala Universityscore: 24.0
    Compelling research in international relations and international political economy on global warming suggests that one part of any meaningful effort to radically reverse current trends of increasing green house gas (GHG) emissions is shared policies among states that generate costs for such emissions in many if not most of the world’s regions. Effectively employing such policies involves gaining much more extensive global commitments and developing much stronger compliance mechanism than those currently found in the Kyoto Protocol. In other words, global (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Dale Jamieson (2010). Climate Change, Responsibility, and Justice. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3):431-445.score: 24.0
    In this paper I make the following claims. In order to see anthropogenic climate change as clearly involving moral wrongs and global injustices, we will have to revise some central concepts in these domains. Moreover, climate change threatens another value (“respect for nature”) that cannot easily be taken up by concerns of global justice or moral responsibility.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Richard J. Arneson (2005). Do Patriotic Ties Limit Global Justice Duties? Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):127 - 150.score: 24.0
    Some theorists who accept the existence of global justice duties to alleviate the condition of distant needy strangers hold that these duties are significantly constrained by special ties to fellow countrymen. The patriotic priority thesis holds that morality requires the members of each nation-state to give priority to helping needy fellow compatriots over more needy distant strangers. Three arguments for constraint and patriotic priority are examined in this essay: an argument from fair play, one from coercion, another from coercion (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). First Steps Toward a Nonideal Theory of Justice. Ethics and Global Politics.score: 24.0
    Theorists have long debated whether John Rawls’ conception of justice as fairness can be extended to nonideal (i.e. unjust) social and political conditions, and if so, what the proper way of extending it is. This paper argues that in order to properly extend justice as fairness to nonideal conditions, Rawls’ most famous innovation – the original position – must be reconceived in the form of a “nonideal original position.” I begin by providing a new analysis of the ideal/nonideal (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Christian Barry & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Does Global Egalitarianism Provide an Impractical and Unattractive Ideal of Justice? International Affairs 84 (5):1025-1039.score: 24.0
    In his important new book National responsibility and global justice, David Miller presents a systematic challenge to existing theories of global justice. In particular, he argues that cosmopolitan egalitarianism must be rejected. Such views, Miller maintains, would place unacceptable burdens on the most productive political communities, undermine national self-determination, and disincentivize political communities from taking responsibility for their fate. They are also impracticable and quite unrealistic, at least under present conditions. Miller offers an alternative account that conceives global (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jeesoo Nam (2013). Biomedical Enhancements as Justice. Bioethics 28 (3).score: 24.0
    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sagar Sanyal (2009). US Military and Covert Action and Global Justice. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):213-234.score: 24.0
    US military intervention and covert action is a significant contributor to global injustice. Discussion of this contributor to global injustice is relatively common in social justice movements. Yet it has been ignored by the global justice literature in political philosophy. This paper aims to fill this gap by introducing the topic into the global justice debate. While the global justice debate has focused on inter-national and supra-national institutions, I argue that an adequate analysis of US military (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Samuel Richard Freeman (2007). Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularly A Theory of Justice, is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism, welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Corinna Mieth (2008). World Poverty as a Problem of Justice? A Critical Comparison of Three Approaches. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):15 - 36.score: 24.0
    With regard to the problem of world poverty, libertarian theories of corrective justice emphasize negative duties and the idea of responsibility whereas utilitarian theories of help concentrate on positive duties based on the capacity of the helper. Thomas Pogge has developed a revised model of compensation that entails positive obligations that are generated by negative duties. He intends to show that the affluent are violating their negative duties to ensure that their conduct will not harm others: They are contributing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Rodney G. Peffer, A Modified Rawlsian Theory of Social Justice: 'Justice as Fair Rights'.score: 24.0
    In my 1990 work – Marxism, Morality, and Social Justice – I argued for four modifications of Rawls’s principles of social justice and rendered a modified version of his theory in four principles, the first of which is the Basic Rights Principle demanding the protection of people’s security and subsistence rights. In both his Political Liberalism (1993) and Justice as Fairness (2001) Rawls explicitly refers to my version of his theory, clearly accepting three of my four proposed (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Enzo Rossi (2012). Justice, Legitimacy, and (Normative) Authority for Political Realists. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (2):149-164.score: 24.0
    One of the main challenges faced by realists in political philosophy is that of offering an account of authority that is genuinely normative and yet does not consist of a moralistic application of general, abstract ethical principles to the practice of politics. Political moralists typically start by devising a conception of justice based on their pre-political moral commitments; authority would then be legitimate only if political power is exercised in accordance with justice. As an alternative to that dominant (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000