Search results for 'Justice and Humanity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity. British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.score: 192.0
    There are many interesting questions to ask about cosmopolitan arguments. Is it true that the sphere of moral concern is global? Which sets of actions would realize the outcomes of global justice that cosmopolitans seek? Are those sets of actions feasible, and when we compare them against each other, which is the most feasible? The question I want to focus on in this paper is a question of the latter kind, but I want to take a slightly unique approach (...)
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  2. Xunwu Chen (2008). Justice, Humanity and Social Toleration. Lexington Books.score: 150.0
     
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  3. Simon Caney (2011). Humanity, Associations and Global Justice: A Defence of Humanity-Centred Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism. The Monist 94 (4):506-534.score: 144.0
    This paper defends an egalitarian conception of global justice against two kinds of criticism. Many who defend egalitarian principles of justice do so on the basis that all humans are part of a common 'association' of some kind. In this paper I defend the humanity-centred approach which holds that persons should be included within the scope of distributive justice simply because they are fellow human beings. The paper has four substantive sections - the first addresses Andrea (...)
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  4. Tony Lynch (2001). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):572 – 574.score: 144.0
    Book Information A Common Humanity: Thinking about <span class='Hi'>Love</span> and Truth and Justice. A Common Humanity: Thinking about <span class='Hi'>Love</span> and Truth and Justice Raimond Gaita London Routledge 2000 xxxi, 293 Hardback £17.99 By Raimond Gaita. Routledge. London. Pp. xxxi, 293. Hardback:£17.99.
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  5. Stan van Hooft (2011). Humanity or Justice? Journal of Global Ethics 7 (3):291-302.score: 144.0
    This paper reflects on a critique of cosmopolitanism mounted by Tom Campbell, who argues that cosmopolitans place undue stress on the issue of global justice. Campbell argues that aid for the impoverished needy in the third world, for example, should be given on the Principle of Humanity rather than on the Principle of Justice. This line of thought is also pursued by ?Liberal Nationalists? like Yael Tamir and David Miller. Thomas Nagel makes a similar distinction and questions (...)
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  6. Raimond Gaita (1999/2000). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. Routledge.score: 126.0
    Powerful and timely, A Common Humanity asks why the language of morality has failed us. Drawing on examples of the Holocaust, the David Irving affair, the case of Mary Bell and the treatment of the Aborigines in Australia, Raimond Gaita challenges our received thinking about evil in this provocative exploration of what makes an ethical society.
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  7. Timothy Chappell (2002). Review: A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):411-414.score: 120.0
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  8. Xunwu Chen (2007). Introduction: The Long Road to Global Justice, Peace, and Humanity. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (3):323–330.score: 120.0
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  9. Glenn Negley (1948). Some Current Thoughts on Law and Destiny:America's Destiny Herman Finer; The Alien and the Asiatic in American Law Milton R. Konvitz; Criminal Justice and Social Reconstruction Hermann Mannheim; The Reconstruction of Humanity Pitirim Sorokin; Group Experience and Democratic Values Grace M. Coyle. Ethics 58 (4):285-.score: 120.0
  10. Lloyd Cox (2007). Review Essay: A Review of Tom Nairn and Paul James, Global Matrix: Nationalism, Globalism and State-Terrorism (London: Pluto, 2005); Jan Nederveen Pieterse, Globalization or Empire? (New York and London: Routledge, 2004); Patrick Hayden and Chamsy El-Ojeili (Eds), Confronting Globalization: Humanity, Justice and the Renewal of Politics (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 90 (1):97-111.score: 120.0
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  11. Holly Lawford-Smith (2010). Feasibility Constraints and the Cosmopolitan Vision: Empirical Reasons for Choosing Justice Over Humanity. In Stan van Hooft & Wim Vandekerckhove (eds.), Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Springer. 137--150.score: 120.0
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  12. Peter Cave (2012). How Deep is Your Love? A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice, by Raimond Gaita (Routledge)£ 17.99/$27.50. [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine 16:56.score: 120.0
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  13. Martha C. Nussbaum (2004). Beyond 'Compassion and Humanity': Justice for Nonhuman Animals. In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press. 299--320.score: 120.0
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  14. Peter Sutch (2012). Normative IR Theory and the Legalization of International Politics: The Dictates of Humanity and of the Public Conscience as a Vehicle for Global Justice. Journal of International Political Theory 8 (1-2):1-24.score: 120.0
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  15. Richard H. Bell & Walter Brueggemann (2008). Rethinking Justice: Restoring Our Humanity. Lexington Books.score: 120.0
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  16. Raimond Gaita (2000). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love & Truth & Justice. Text Pub..score: 120.0
     
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  17. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Life Value, the Civil Commons and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):11-61.score: 102.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
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  18. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Understanding Life Value, the Civil Commons, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):2011.score: 102.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
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  19. Saladin Meckled-Garcia (2004). International Justice, Human Rights and Neutrality. Res Publica 10 (2):153-174.score: 90.0
    A number of theorists have tried to resolve the tension between a western-oriented liberal scheme of human rights and an account that accommodates different political systems and constitutional ideals than the liberal one. One important way the tension has been addressed is through a “neutral” or tolerant, notion of human rights, as present in the work of Rawls, Scanlon and Buchanan. In this paper I argue that neutrality cannot by itself explain the difference between rights considered appropriate for liberal states (...)
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  20. Susan Dicklitch & Aditi Malik (2010). Justice, Human Rights, and Reconciliation in Postconflict Cambodia. Human Rights Review 11 (4):515-530.score: 86.0
    Retribution? Restitution? Reconciliation? “Justice” comes in many forms as witnessed by the spike in war crimes tribunals, Truth & Reconciliation Commissions, hybrid tribunals and genocide trials. Which, if any form is appropriate should be influenced by the culture of the people affected. It took Cambodia over three decades to finally address the ghosts of its Khmer Rouge past with the creation of a hybrid Khmer Rouge Tribunal. But how meaningful is justice to the majority of survivors of the (...)
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  21. Mathias Risse (2012). On Global Justice. Princeton University Press.score: 82.0
    The grounds of justice -- "Un pouvoir ordinaire": shared membership in a state as a ground of -- Justice -- Internationalism versus statism and globalism: contemporary debates -- What follows from our common humanity? : the institutional stance, human rights, and nonrelationism -- Hugo Grotius revisited : collective ownership of the Earth and global public reason -- "Our sole habitation" : a contemporary approach to collective ownership of the earth -- Toward a contingent derivation of human rights (...)
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  22. Matthew Murphy & Jordi Vives (2013). Perceptions of Justice and the Human Rights Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):781-797.score: 80.0
    Human rights declarations are instruments used to introduce universal standards of ethics. The UN’s Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework (Ruggie, Protect, respect, and remedy: A Framework for business and human rights. UN Doc A/HRC/8/5, 2008; Guiding principles on business and human rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect, and Remedy” framework. UN Doc A/HRC/17/31, 2011) intends to provide guidance for corporate behavior in regard to human rights. This article applies concepts from the field of organizational justice to the arena (...)
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  23. Uwe Steinhoff (2012). Unsavory Implications of a Theory of Justice and the Law of Peoples: The Denial of Human Rights and the Justification of Slavery. Philosophical Forum 43 (2):175-196.score: 78.0
    Many philosophers have criticized John Rawls’s Law of Peoples. However, often these criticisms take it for granted that the moral conclusions drawn in A Theory of Justice are superior to those in the former book. In my view, however, Rawls comes to many of his 'conclusions' without too many actual inferences. More precisely, my argument here is that if one takes Rawls’s premises and the assumptions made about the original position(s) seriously and does in fact think them through to (...)
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  24. Clarence W. Joldersma (2011). Education: Understanding, Ethics, and the Call of Justice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):441-447.score: 78.0
    Education is interpreted as something basic to our humanity. As part of our primordial way of being human, education is intrinsic to the understanding’s functioning. At the same time education involves an originary ethical relation to the other, unsettling the self-directed character of the striving to live. And because of its social setting, the call of many others, education orients one to the social, to the call of justice.
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  25. Sheldon Ekland-Olson (2013). Life and Death Decisions: The Quest for Morality and Justice in Human Societies. Routledge.score: 78.0
    Based on the author's award-winning and hugely popular undergraduate course at the University of Texas, this book explores these questions and the fundamentally sociological processes which underlie the quest for morality and justice in ...
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  26. Rabee Toumi (forthcoming). Globalization and Health Care: Global Justice and the Role of Physicians. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-10.score: 78.0
    In today’s globalized world, nations cannot be totally isolated from or indifferent to their neighbors, especially in regards to medicine and health. While globalization has brought prosperity to millions, disparities among nations and nationals are growing raising once again the question of justice. Similarly, while medicine has developed dramatically over the past few decades, health disparities at the global level are staggering. Seemingly, what our humanity could achieve in matters of scientific development is not justly distributed to benefit (...)
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  27. Megan-Jane Johnstone (2011). Nursing and Justice as a Basic Human Need. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):34-44.score: 70.0
  28. Andreas Follesdal & Thomas Pogge (eds.) (2005). Real World Justice. Grounds, Principles, Human Rights, and Social Institutions. Springer.score: 70.0
    It helps ordinary citizens evaluate their options and their responsibility for global institutional factors, and it challenges social scientists to address the causes of poverty and hunger that act across borders.The present volume ...
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  29. Elizabeth Cripps (2010). Saving the Polar Bear, Saving the World: Can the Capabilities Approach Do Justice to Humans, Animals and Ecosystems? [REVIEW] Res Publica 16 (1):1-22.score: 68.0
    Martha Nussbaum has expanded the capabilities approach to defend positive duties of justice to individuals who fall below Rawls’ standard for fully cooperating members of society, including sentient nonhuman animals. Building on this, David Schlosberg has defended the extension of capabilities justice not only to individual animals but also to entire species and ecosystems. This is an attractive vision: a happy marriage of social, environmental and ecological justice, which also respects the claims of individual animals. This paper (...)
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  30. Mark Coeckelbergh (2009). Distributive Justice and Co-Operation in a World of Humans and Non-Humans: A Contractarian Argument for Drawing Non-Humans Into the Sphere of Justice. Res Publica 15 (1):67-84.score: 68.0
    Various arguments have been provided for drawing non-humans such as animals and artificial agents into the sphere of moral consideration. In this paper, I argue for a shift from an ontological to a social-philosophical approach: instead of asking what an entity is, we should try to conceptually grasp the quasi-social dimension of relations between non-humans and humans. This allows me to reconsider the problem of justice, in particular distributive justice . Engaging with the work of Rawls, I show (...)
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  31. Stephen Napier (2013). Challenging Research on Human Subjects: Justice and Uncompensated Harms. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (1):29-51.score: 68.0
    Ethical challenges to certain aspects of research on human subjects are not uncommon; examples include challenges to first-in-human trials (Chapman in J Clin Res Bioethics 2(4):1–8, 2011), certain placebo controlled trials (Anderson in J Med Philos 31:65–81, 2006; Anderson and Kimmelman in Kennedy Inst Ethics J 20(1):75–98, 2010) and “sham” surgery (Macklin in N Engl J Med 341:992–996, 1999). To date, however, there are few challenges to research when the subjects are competent and the research is more than minimal risk (...)
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  32. Annabelle Mooney (2012). Restoring Trust: Plachimada, the Human Trust and Anticipatory Negligence as Restorative Justice. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (2):1-19.score: 68.0
    This paper argues for proleptic restorative justice in the area of the environment in the form of a ‘human trust’. Drawing inspiration from the Roman public trust, the human trust insists that some ‘goods’ are so important that they can neither be owned nor spoiled; rather, they must be protected. In order to explain this model, water rights will be used as an example, specifically, the case of Plachimada’s battle with Coca-Cola over the use of local ground water in (...)
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  33. Valerie Oosterveld (2009). The Special Court for Sierra Leone's Consideration of Gender-Based Violence: Contributing to Transitional Justice? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (1):73-98.score: 68.0
    Serious gender-based crimes were committed against women and girls during Sierra Leone’s decade-long armed conflict. This article examines how the Special Court for Sierra Leone has approached these crimes in its first four judgments. The June 20, 2007 trial judgment in the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council case assists international criminal law’s limited understanding of the crime against humanity of forced marriage, but also collapses evidence of that crime into the war crime of outrages upon personal dignity. The February 22, (...)
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  34. H. M. Burdenski & D. H. Dunson (1999). Acquiring Economic Justice for All: An Ongoing Struggle. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (2):93 - 99.score: 66.0
    Ten years have passed since the National Council of Catholic Bishops presented their pastoral letter Economic Justice for All. For a democratic society to succeed, it must cultivate moral attachments. The following three questions are asked of all Americans regarding social ethics: l) How do my economic choices contribute to a sensitivity to those in need? 2) With what care, human kindness and justice do I conduct myself at work? 3) How do I strike a balance (...)
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  35. Lee Basham (2002). Why God Lied to Me: Salvationist Theism and Justice. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (2):231 - 249.score: 66.0
    It is widely assumed that God is either incapable of lying to humans or utterly unwilling to do so. However, there appear to be compelling reasons for God to intentionally deceive that are rooted in the traditional conception of God as an agent of salvation for humanity. A terroristic threat like eternal damnation ("hell") illustrates these reasons. God's love for human beings as wayward members of a divine family in concert with the obvious moral and cognitive limitations many humans (...)
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  36. Martin Woods (2012). Exploring the Relevance of Social Justice Within a Relational Nursing Ethic. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):56-65.score: 66.0
    Abstract In the last few decades, a growing number of commentators have questioned the appropriateness of the 'justice view' of ethics as a suitable approach in health care ethics, and most certainly in nursing. Essentially, in their ethical deliberations, it is argued that nurses do not readily adopt the high degree of impartiality and objectivity that is associated with a justice view; instead their moral practices are more accurately reflected through the use of alternative approaches such as relational (...)
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  37. Steve Fuller (2012). The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):113-123.score: 64.0
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford (...)
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  38. Kawser Ahmed, Sean Byrne, Peter Karari, Olga Skarlato & Julie Hyde (2012). Civil Society/NGO Leaders Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the IFI and the EU Peace III Fund in Promoting Equality, Equity, Social Justice and the Fulfillment of Basic Human Needs in (L') Derry and the Border Area. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 22 (2):73-99.score: 64.0
    External economic aid has played an important role in Northern Ireland’s peacebuilding process, particularly by funding community-based intervention projects.As a consequence of the Troubles, Northern Ireland suffered from severe socioeconomic inequality. These locally funded projects have fostered social cohesion by encouraging cross community interaction aimed at reducing violence and sectarianism. The NGO projects also promote social justice, reduce inequality, and provide the means to meet people’s basic human needs. The field research for this article was conducted during the summer (...)
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  39. Julius Stone (1965). Human Law and Human Justice. Sydney, Maitland Publications.score: 62.0
    And, indeed, the third of this trilogy of books, Social Dimensions of Law and Justice (), may also be regarded as similarly complementary to those which ...
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  40. D. G. Brown (2012). Mill's Justice and Political Liberalism. In Leonard Kahn (ed.), MILL on Justice. Palgrave Macmillan. 135.score: 60.0
    In her valuable book Hiding from humanity: Disgust, shame and the law, Nussbaum says that she reaches many of the same practical conclusions as Mill. But she argues that Mill’s conceptions of liberty, justice, and respect for rival ideas of the good and for religious belief, are defective, and further that they do not provide as adequate a basis for the form of political liberalism she recommends. Actually, the alleged defects in Mill rest largely on misrepresentations, but more (...)
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  41. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matt Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in the History of Political and Social Thought: Finding A Fair Share. Routledge.score: 58.0
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
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  42. William A. Galston (1980). Justice and the Human Good. University of Chicago Press.score: 58.0
     
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  43. Ulf Schmidt (2004). Justice at Nuremberg: Leo Alexander and the Nazi Doctors' Trial. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 58.0
    Justice at Nuremberg traces the history of the Nuremberg Doctors' Trial held in 1946-47, as seen through the eyes of the Austrian bliogemigrbliogé psychiatrist Leo Alexander. His investigations helped the United States to prosecute twenty German doctors and three administrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The legacy of Nuremberg was profound. In the Nuremberg code--a landmark in the history of modern medical ethics--the judges laid down, for the first time, international guidelines for permissible experiments on humans. (...)
     
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  44. Simon Caney (2009). Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):125-146.score: 54.0
    The prospect of dangerous climate change requires Humanity to limit the emission of greenhouse gases. This in turn raises the question of how the permission to emit greenhouse gases should be distributed and among whom. In this article the author criticises three principles of distributive justice that have often been advanced in this context. He also argues that the predominantly statist way in which the question is framed occludes some morally relevant considerations. The latter part of the article (...)
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  45. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Justice as Inherent Rights: A Response to My Commentators. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):261-279.score: 54.0
    The critical comments by my fellow symposiasts on my book, Justice: Rights and Wrongs , have provided me with the opportunity to clarify parts of my argument and to correct some misunderstandings; they have also helped me see more clearly than I did before the import of some parts of my argument. In his comments, Paul Weithman points out features of the right order conception of justice that I had not noticed. They have also prodded me to clarify (...)
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  46. James Daly (2000). Marx and Justice. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (3):351 – 370.score: 54.0
    Marx's thought about justice is essentialist and dialectical. It has been interpreted in terms of immoralism. It is rather a synthesis of the traditional natural law, based on the Aristotelian concept of nature as the potential for perfection or ideal fulfilment, radically different from the Hobbesian reductionist concept of nature as atomistic and mechanical; of the tradition of dialectics in its German idealist form; and of Feuerbach's humanism. Marx's explicitly realist idea of science reveals 'veiled wage-slavery'. Concentration on the (...)
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  47. Massimo Renzo (2010). A Criticism of the International Harm Principle. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):267-282.score: 54.0
    According to the received view crimes like torture, rape, enslavement or enforced prostitution are domestic crimes if they are committed as isolated or sporadic events, but become crimes against humanity when they are committed as part of a ‘widespread or systematic attack’ against a civilian population. Only in the latter case can these crimes be prosecuted by the international community. One of the most influential accounts of this idea is Larry May’s International Harm Principle, which states that crimes against (...)
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  48. Mark Coeckelbergh (2007). Principles or Imagination? Two Approaches to Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):203 – 221.score: 54.0
    What does it mean to introduce the notion of imagination in the discussion about global justice? What is gained by studying the role of imagination in thinking about global justice? Does a focus on imagination imply that we must replace existing influential principle-centred approaches such as that of John Rawls and his critics? We can distinguish between two approaches to global justice. One approach is Rawlsian and Kantian in inspiration. Discussions within this tradition typically focus on the (...)
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  49. Massimo Renzo (2012). Crimes Against Humanity and the Limits of International Criminal Law. Law and Philosophy 31 (4):443-476.score: 54.0
    Crimes against humanity are supposed to have a collective dimension with respect both to their victims and their perpetrators. According to the orthodox view, these crimes can be committed by individuals against individuals, but only in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against the group to which the victims belong. In this paper I offer a new conception of crimes against humanity and a new justification for their international prosecution. This conception has important implications as to (...)
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  50. Michael Green (2005). Social Justice, Voluntarism, and Liberal Nationalism. Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (3):265-283.score: 54.0
    The view that social justice takes priority over both global justice and the demands of sub-groups faces two critics. Particularist critics ask why societies should have fundamental significance compared with other groups as far as justice is concerned. Cosmopolitan critics ask why any social unit short of humanity as a whole should have fundamental significance as far as justice is concerned. One way of trying to answer these critics is to show that members of societies (...)
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