Search results for 'Justice, Administration of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lucinda Vandervort (2012). Access to Justice and the Public Interest in the Administration of Justice. University of New Brunswick Law Journal 63:124-144.score: 179.0
    The public interest in the administration of justice requires access to justice for all. But access to justice must be “meaningful” access. Meaningful access requires procedures, processes, and institutional structures that facilitate communication among participants and decision-makers and ensure that judges and other decision-makers have the resources they need to render fully informed and sound decisions. Working from that premise, which is based on a reconceptualization of the objectives and methods of the justice process, the author proposes numerous specific (...)
     
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  2. Le Cheng (2011). Administration of Justice and Multimodality in Media: Semiotic Translation, Conflict and Compatibility. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):491-502.score: 177.0
    Law as one sign system can be recorded and interpreted by another sign system—media. If each transaction in court is taken as a sign, it can be interpreted or transferred by different signs of media for the same purpose, though with different effects. This study focuses on the transformative effects of the semiotic revolution in media on law. The present research revealed that the evolution of media has driven the administration of justice to pay more attention to the process (...)
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  3. David Lyons (1971/1993). Moral Aspects of Legal Theory: Essays on Law, Justice, and Political Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 108.0
    David Lyons is one of the preeminent philosophers of law active in the United States. This volume comprises essays written over a period of twenty years in which Professor Lyons outlines his fundamental views about the nature of law and its relation to morality and justice. The underlying theme of the book is that a system of law has only a tenuous connection with morality and justice. Contrary to those legal theorists who maintain that no matter how bad the law (...)
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  4. Ross Cranston (2006). How Law Works: The Machinery and Impact of Civil Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    This book looks at the civil justice system - the courts and what they do; legal aid and other methods of providing access to justice; lawyers and their conduct; and the role of legal procedure. It also looks at the impact the civil justice system has on wider society, and its relationship with economics and commercial development. The book is largely focussed on Britain, but includes material from the USA, the Indian sub-continent, south-east Asia, and Aboriginal society in Australia.
     
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  5. Stuart Henry (1983). Private Justice: Towards Integrated Theorising in the Sociology of Law. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 96.0
    Good,No Highlights,No Markup,all pages are intact, Slight Shelfwear,may have the corners slightly dented, may have slight color changes/slightly damaged spine.
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  6. Patrick Kerans (1982). Punishment Vs. Reconciliation: Retributive Justice and Social Justice in the Light of Social Ethics. Queen's Theological College.score: 96.0
     
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  7. Nitin J. Vyas, Ranjan K. Panda & Bhaskar Vyas (eds.) (2003). Philosophy of Justice. Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan.score: 96.0
     
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  8. Lucinda Vandervort (2001). Mistake of Law and Obstruction of Justice: A 'Bad Excuse' ... Even for a Lawyer! University of New Brunswick Law Journal 50: 171-186.score: 92.0
    In Regina v. Murray, (2000, Ont S.Ct.J.) the learned trial judge, Justice Gravely, errs in his interpretation and application of the law of mens rea in the offense of willfully attempting to obstruct justice under section 139(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada. In view of his findings of fact and law, including the determination that the accused knowingly and intentionally committed the actus reus of the offense and the absence of any suggestion that he lacked awareness of any relevant (...)
     
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  9. H. F. J., Robert J. Bonner & Gertrude Smith (1931). The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle. Journal of Hellenic Studies 51:126.score: 90.0
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  10. R. J. Hopper, R. J. Bonner & Gertrude Smith (1938). The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle; Volume II. Journal of Hellenic Studies 58:261.score: 90.0
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  11. H. Grant Robertson (1924). The Administration of Justice in the Athenian Empire. Journal of Hellenic Studies 44:288.score: 90.0
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  12. Glenn R. Morrow (1938). Book Review:The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle, Vol. II. Robert J. Bonner, Gertrude Smith. [REVIEW] Ethics 49 (1):104-.score: 87.0
  13. G. P. Burton (1998). Deputy Emperors M. Peachin: Iudex Vice Caesaris: Deputy Emperors and the Administration of Justice During the Principate. (Heidelberger Althistorische Beiträge Und Epigraphische Studien, 21.) Pp. X + 267. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1996. Paper, DM/Sw. Frs. 88/öS 687. ISBN: 3-515-06772-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (01):103-104.score: 87.0
  14. M. Cary (1938). The Administration of Justice in Athens R. J. Bonner and Gertrude Smith: The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle. Volume 2. Pp. Vi + 320. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1938. Cloth, 16s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (06):231-232.score: 87.0
  15. G. Burton (1998). Iudex Vice Caesaris: Deputy Emperors and the Administration of Justice During the Principate. M Peachin. The Classical Review 48 (1):103-104.score: 87.0
  16. M. Cary (1924). The Administration of Justice in the Athenian Empire The Administration of Justice in the Athenian Empire. By H. Grant Robertson. One Vol. Pp. 89. University of Toronto, 1924. $1.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (5-6):131-.score: 87.0
  17. M. Cary (1925). The Administration of Justice From Hesiod to Solon. By Gertrude Smith, Ph.D. One Vol. Pp. 80. Wisconsin: George Banta Publishing Company, 1924. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (3-4):87-.score: 87.0
  18. M. Cary (1930). The Administration of Justice in Greece The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle. By R. J. Bonner and Gertrude Smith. Pp. Viii + 390. University of Chicago, 1930. 18s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (06):227-228.score: 87.0
  19. Adam Dodek (2012). Economic Pressures Put Courts in the Crosshairs of Reforms to the Administration of Justice: Correspondent's Report From Canada. Legal Ethics 15 (1):126.score: 87.0
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  20. Herbert Harley (1915). Book Review:Preliminary Report on Efficiency in the Administration of Justice. Charles W.Eliot, Moorfield Storey, Louis D Brandeis, Adolph J.Rodenbeck, Roscoe Pound. [REVIEW] Ethics 25 (2):252-.score: 87.0
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  21. Fred Weingarten (1986). Electronic Surveillance and Civil Liberties: Testimony of Fred W. Weingarten Before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Civil Liberties and Administration of Justice. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 15 (4):13-17.score: 87.0
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  22. Mark R. Wicclair (1985). A Shield Privilege for Reporters V. The Administration of Justice and the Right to a Fair Trial. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2):1-14.score: 87.0
  23. Mark R. Wicclair & Richard P. Cunningham (1985). A Shield Privilege for Reporters V. The Administration of Justice and the Right to a Fair Trial: Is There a Conflict? [With Commentary]. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2):1 - 17.score: 87.0
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  24. Mark Wicclair (1986). A Shield Right for Reporters Vs. The Administration of Justice and the Right to a Fair Trial: Is There a Conflict? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2).score: 87.0
     
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  25. W. S. Milner (1931). Book Review:The Administration of Justice From Homer to Aristotle. Robert J. Bonner, Gertrude Smith. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (2):258-.score: 87.0
  26. David J. Cornwell (2006). Criminal Punishment and Restorative Justice: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives. North American Distributor, International Specialised Book Services.score: 81.0
    Provides an international perspective as to the potential of restorative justice to * Deliver better ways of dealing with offenders and victims * Reduce the use ...
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  27. Alan W. Norrie (2000). Punishment, Responsibility, and Justice: A Relational Critique. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    This book addresses the retributive and "orthodox subjectivist" theories that dominate criminal justice theory alongside recent "revisionist" and "postmodern" approaches. Norrie argues that all these approaches, together with their faults and contradictions, stem from their orientation to themes in Kantian moral philosophy. He explores an alternative relational or dialectical approach; examines the work of Ashworth, Duff, Fletcher, Moore, Smith, and Williams; and considers key doctrinal issues.
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  28. Ian Marsh (2004). Criminal Justice: An Introduction to Philosophies, Theories and Practice. Routledge.score: 81.0
    This new text will encourage students to develop a deeper understanding of the context and the current workings of the criminal justice system. Part One offers a clear, accessible and comprehensive review of the major philosophical aims and sociological theories of punishment, the history of justice and punishment, and the developing perspective of victimology. In Part Two, the focus is on the main areas of the contemporary criminal justice system including the police, the courts and judiciary, prisons, and community penalties. (...)
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  29. Janna Thompson (1992). Justice and World Order: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.score: 81.0
    Thompson considers the concept of international justice as it has developed in political theory from Hobbes to the present day, and develops a theory designed to take account of both individual freedom and differences among communities. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  30. Limin Bao (2011). “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.score: 77.0
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the strength of (...)
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  31. Matthew Adler, The Pigou-Dalton Principle and the Structure of Distributive Justice.score: 76.0
    The Pigou-Dalton (PD) principle recommends a non-leaky, non-rank-switching transfer of goods from someone with more goods to someone with less. This Article defends the PD principle as an aspect of distributive justice—enabling the comparison of two distributions, neither completely equal, as more or less just. It shows how the PD principle flows from a particular view, adumbrated by Thomas Nagel, about the grounding of distributive justice in individuals’ “claims.” And it criticizes two competing frameworks for thinking about justice that less (...)
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  32. Xianzhong Huang (2007). Justice as a Virtue: An Analysis of Aristotle's Virtue of Justice. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):265-279.score: 75.0
    People currently regard justice as the main principle of institutions and society, while in ancient Greek people took it as the virtue of citizens. This article analyzes Aristotle’s virtue of justice in his method of virtue ethics, discussing the nature of virtue, how justice is the virtue of citizens, what kind of virtue the justice of citizens is, and the prospect of the virtue of justice against a background of institutional justice. Since virtue can be said to be a specific (...)
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  33. Gaoshan Zuo (2007). Just War and Justice of War: Reflections on Ethics of War. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):280-290.score: 75.0
    War can be defined as organized political violence among two or more nations. In accordance with the purpose, processes and results of war, the ethics of war generally comprises three aspects: right ethics, action ethics and duty ethics. The most important issue in ethics of war is “justice”. “Justice” and “injustice” as a conceptual pair do not prescribe the objective character of war but rather convey a subjective attitude and ethical position that have the potential to compel a populace to (...)
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  34. Laurence Ashworth & Clinton Free (2006). Marketing Dataveillance and Digital Privacy: Using Theories of Justice to Understand Consumers' Online Privacy Concerns. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):107 - 123.score: 75.0
    Technology used in online marketing has advanced to a state where collection, enhancement and aggregation of information are instantaneous. This proliferation of customer information focused technology brings with it a host of issues surrounding customer privacy. This article makes two key contributions to the debate concerning digital privacy. First, we use theories of justice to help understand the way consumers conceive of, and react to, privacy concerns. Specifically, it is argued that an important component of consumers’ privacy concerns relates to (...)
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  35. Sheldene Simola (2003). Ethics of Justice and Care in Corporate Crisis Management. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (4):351 - 361.score: 75.0
    Despite the importance of ethics in corporate crisis management, they have received limited attention in the academic literature. This article contributes to the evolving conversation on ethics in crisis management by elucidating the ethics of "justice" and "care" and distinguishing between them. Examples of the two approaches are offered through consideration of cases in corporate crisis management, including the alleged glass contamination case faced by Gerber Products Company, and, the shooting tragedy at San Ysidro faced by McDonald''s Corporation. It is (...)
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  36. Elizabeth E. Umphress, Lily Run Ren, John B. Bingham & Celile Itir Gogus (2009). The Influence of Distributive Justice on Lying for and Stealing From a Supervisor. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):507 - 518.score: 75.0
    In a controlled laboratory experiment, we found evidence for our predictions that participants who received fair distributive treatment were more likely to lie to give a supervisor a good performance evaluation than those treated unfairly, and those who received unfair distributive treatment were more likely to steal money from a supervisor than those treated fairly. We further proposed that the presence of an ethical code of conduct would moderate these relationships such that when the code was present these relationships would (...)
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  37. Jonathan Rothchild (2011). Dispenser of the Mercy of the Government: Pardons, Justice, and Felony Disenfranchisement. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):48-70.score: 75.0
    I argue that the aporetic character of clemency must be understood in terms of its unmerited and merited character to achieve the underlying purposes of justice within criminal justice: justice as fairness (punishment must be deserved and proportionate) and justice as restoration (repair of the harm to victims and society and the reintegration of offenders) are paramount goals. Rather than destabilizing political order, pardons can render productive potential tensions between justice as fairness and justice as restoration. Taking as my conceptual (...)
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  38. Andrew Gibson (2009). Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):102-118.score: 75.0
    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, is subject to historical interpretation. He (...)
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  39. Lawrence Douglas, Austin Sarat & Martha Merrill Umphrey (2005). At the Limits of Law. In Lawrence Douglas, Austin Sarat & Martha Merrill Umphrey (eds.), The Limits of Law. Stanford University Press.score: 75.0
    This collection brings together well-established scholars to examine the limits of law, a topic that has been of broad interest since the events of 9/11 and the responses of U.S. law and policy to those events. The limiting conditions explored in this volume include marking law’s relationship to acts of terror, states of emergency, gestures of surrender, payments of reparations, offers of amnesty, and invocations of retroactivity. These essays explore how law is challenged, frayed, and constituted out of contact with (...)
     
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  40. Karen McAuliffe (2011). Hybrid Texts and Uniform Law? The Multilingual Case Law of the Court of Justice of the European Union. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (1):97-115.score: 75.0
    The case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) is shaped by the language in which it is drafted—i.e. French. However, because French is rarely the mother tongue of those drafting that case law, the texts produced are often stilted and awkward. In addition, those drafting such case law are constrained in their use of language and style of writing (owing to pressures of technology and in order to reinforce the rule of law). These factors have (...)
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  41. Martijn Boot (2012). The Aim of a Theory of Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):7-21.score: 74.0
    Amartya Sen argues that for the advancement of justice identification of ‘perfect’ justice is neither necessary nor sufficient. He replaces ‘perfect’ justice with comparative justice. Comparative justice limits itself to comparing social states with respect to degrees of justice. Sen’s central thesis is that identifying ‘perfect’ justice and comparing imperfect social states are ‘analytically disjoined’. This essay refutes Sen’s thesis by demonstrating that to be able to make adequate comparisons we need to identify and integrate criteria of comparison. This is (...)
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  42. Rodney G. Peffer, A Modified Rawlsian Theory of Social Justice: 'Justice as Fair Rights'.score: 72.0
    In my 1990 work – Marxism, Morality, and Social Justice – I argued for four modifications of Rawls’s principles of social justice and rendered a modified version of his theory in four principles, the first of which is the Basic Rights Principle demanding the protection of people’s security and subsistence rights. In both his Political Liberalism (1993) and Justice as Fairness (2001) Rawls explicitly refers to my version of his theory, clearly accepting three of my four proposed modifications but rejecting (...)
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  43. Gabriel Wollner (2010). Framing, Reciprocity and the Grounds of Egalitarian Justice. Res Publica 16 (3):281-298.score: 72.0
    John Rawls famously claims that ‘justice is the first virtue of social institutions’. On one of its readings, this remark seems to suggest that social institutions are essential for obligations of justice to arise. The spirit of this interpretation has recently sparked a new debate about the grounds of justice. What are the conditions that generate principles of distributive justice? I am interested in a specific version of this question. What conditions generate egalitarian principles of distributive justice and give rise (...)
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  44. Stewart Clem (2013). The Epistemic Relevance of the Virtue of Justice. Philosophia 41 (2):301-311.score: 72.0
    Recent literature on the relationship between knowledge and justice has tended to focus exclusively on the social and ethical dimensions of this relationship (e.g. social injustices related to knowledge and power, etc.). For the purposes of this article, I am interested in examining the virtue of justice and its effects on the cognitive faculties of its possessor (and, correspondingly, the effects of the vice of injustice). Drawing upon Thomas Aquinas’s account of the virtue of justice, I argue that in certain (...)
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  45. Peter van Schilfgaarde (2009). Rawls and Ricoeur: Converging Notions of Empowerment to Justice. Res Publica 15 (2):121-136.score: 72.0
    Empowerment is a key word in Catherine Audard’s new book on Rawls and a central characteristic of Rawls’ approach to justice. A very different “hermeneutic” approach to justice is presented by Paul Ricoeur, the French philosopher and theologian who, against the background of his own work, examined Rawls’ views in several publications. This essay compares the two views and defends the proposition that empowerment is the common denominator. The author suggests that Rawls would not have objected to including some of (...)
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  46. Darryl J. Murphy (2012). Are Intellectual Property Rights Compatible with Rawlsian Principles of Justice? Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):109-121.score: 72.0
    This paper argues that intellectual property rights are incompatible with Rawls’s principles of justice. This conclusion is based upon an analysis of the social stratification that emerges as a result of the patent mechanism which defines a marginalized group and ensure that its members remain alienated from the rights, benefits, and freedoms afforded by the patent product. This stratification is further complicated, so I argue, by the copyright mechanism that restricts and redistributes those rights already distributed by means of the (...)
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  47. Margaret R. Holmgren (2012). Forgiveness and Retribution: Responding to Wrongdoing. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction and overview; 2. The nature of forgiveness and resentment; 3. The moral analysis of the attitudes of forgiveness and resentment defined; 4. The moral analysis of the attitudes of self-forgiveness and self-condemnation; 5. Philosophical underpinnings of the basic attitudes: forgiveness, resentment, and the nature of persons; 6. Moral theory: justice and desert; 7. The public response to wrongdoing; 8. Restorative justice: the public response to wrongdoing and the process of addressing the wrong.
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  48. Douglas MacKay (2013). Standard of Care, Institutional Obligations, and Distributive Justice. Bioethics 28 (2).score: 72.0
    The problem of standard of care in clinical research concerns the level of treatment that investigators must provide to subjects in clinical trials. Commentators often formulate answers to this problem by appealing to two distinct types of obligations: professional obligations and natural duties. In this article, I investigate whether investigators also possess institutional obligations that are directly relevant to the problem of standard of care, that is, those obligations a person has because she occupies a particular institutional role. I examine (...)
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  49. Robert C. Robinson (2009). A Defense of the Maximin Principle in Rawls' Theory of Justice. Humanity and Social Science Journal 4 (2):175-179.score: 72.0
    In his celebrated work, A Theory of Justice (1971), John Rawls argues that, from behind the veil of ignorance, parties in the original position will employ the maximin decision rule to reason to his two principles of justice. In this journal, Olatunji Oyeshile offers a brief and concise outline of some of the historical criticisms of that argument. Oyeshile offers two important criticisms of Rawls' argument. Both, however, are somewhat misplaced, as I shall show. First, he claims that decision theory (...)
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  50. Martin O'Neill & Thad Williamson (2009). Property-Owning Democracy and the Demands of Justice. Living Reviews in Democracy 1:1-10.score: 72.0
    John Rawls is arguably the most important political philosopher of the past century. His theory of justice has set the agenda for debate in mainstream political philosophy for the past forty years, and has had an important influence in economics, law, sociology, and other disciplines. However, despite the importance and popularity of Rawls's work, there is no clear picture of what a society that met Rawls's principles of justice would actually look like. This article sets out to explore that question.
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