Search results for 'Justification (Theory of knowledge' (try it on Scholar)

401 found
Order:
  1. Keith Lehrer (2000). Theory of Knowledge. Westview Press.
    In this impressive second edition of Theory of Knowledge, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the traditional definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief, and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge,the work of Platinga, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories, contextualism, and recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   144 citations  
  2.  34
    Luciano Floridi (1993). The Problem of the Justification of a Theory of Knowledge. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24 (2):205 - 233.
    The article concerns the meta-epistemological problem of the justification of a theory of knowledge and provides a reconstruction of the history of its formulations. In the first section, I analyse the connections between Sextus Empiricus' diallelus, Montaigne's rouet and Chisholm's "problem of criterion"; in the second section I focus on the link between the diallelus and the Cartesian circle; in the third section I reconstruct the origin of "Fries' trilemma"; finally, in the last section I draw some general (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  24
    Luciano Floridi (1994). The Problem of the Justification of a Theory of Knowledge. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 25 (1):17 - 49.
    The article analyses the meta-epistemological problem of the justification of a theory of knowledge. The first section is dedicated to the morphological reconstruction of the problem, the second presents a diagnosis of the problem in terms of a metatheoretical and logically non-contradictory petitio principii and the third delineates the limits within which strategies for the treatment of the problem could be elaborated.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  24
    Paul Silva (forthcoming). Knowing How to Put Knowledge First in the Theory of Justification. Episteme.
    I provide a novel knowledge-first account of justification that avoids the pitfalls of existing accounts while preserving the underlying insight of knowledge-first epistemologies: that knowledge comes first. The view I propose is, roughly, this: justification is grounded in our practical knowledge (know-how) concerning the acquisition of propositional knowledge (knowledge-that). I first refine my thesis in response to immediate objections. In subsequent sections I explain the various ways in which this thesis is theoretically (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Anthony Robert Booth (2011). The Theory of Epistemic Justification and the Theory of Knowledge: A Divorce. Erkenntnis 75 (1):37-43.
    Richard Foley has suggested that the search for a good theory of epistemic justification and the analysis of knowledge should be conceived of as two distinct projects. However, he has not offered much support for this claim, beyond highlighting certain salutary consequences it might have. In this paper, I offer some further support for Foley’s claim by offering an argument and a way to conceive the claim in a way that makes it as plausible as its denial, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  31
    Mohammadreza Zolfagharian, Reza Akbari & Hamidreza Fartookzadeh (2014). Theory of Knowledge in System Dynamics Models. Foundations of Science 19 (2):189-207.
    Having entered into the problem structuring methods, system dynamics (SD) is an approach, among systems’ methodologies, which claims to recognize the main structures of socio-economic behaviors. However, the concern for building or discovering strong philosophical underpinnings of SD, undoubtedly playing an important role in the modeling process, is a long-standing issue, in a way that there is a considerable debate about the assumptions or the philosophical foundations of it. In this paper, with a new perspective, we have explored theory of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Mylan Engel (1988). Personal and Doxastic Variants of Epistemic Justification and Their Roles in the Theory of Knowledge. Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    Most epistemologists agree that epistemic justification is required for knowledge. This requirement is usually formulated in one of two ways: S knows that p only if S is justified in believing that p. S knows that p only if S's belief that p is justified. Surprisingly and are generally regarded as synonymous formulations of the justification condition. In Chapter 1, I argue that such a synonymy thesis is mistaken and that, in fact, and specify substantively different requirements. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  62
    Jarrett Leplin (2009). A Theory of Epistemic Justification. Springer.
    This book proposes an original theory of epistemic justification that offers a new way to relate justification to the epistemic goal of truth-conducive belief.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  31
    William Alston (2005). Beyond Justification: Dimensions of Epistemic Evaluation. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    " In a book that seeks to shift the ground of debate within theory of knowledge, William P. Alston finds that the century-lo.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   86 citations  
  10.  10
    William Alston (1992). Epistemic Justification. Essays in the Theory of Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):228-232.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  11.  94
    Noah Marcelino Lemos (2007). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Epistemology or the theory of knowledge is one of the cornerstones of analytic philosophy, and this book provides a clear and accessible introduction to the subject. It discusses some of the main theories of justification, including foundationalism, coherentism, reliabilism, and virtue epistemology. Other topics include the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, skepticism, the problem of epistemic circularity, the problem of the criterion, a priori knowledge, and naturalized epistemology. Intended primarily for students taking a first class in epistemology, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  78
    Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity Press.
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    James E. Taylor & William P. Alston (1991). Epistemic Justification: Essays in the Theory of Knowledge.Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (163):249.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    Frederick L. Will (1978). Induction and Justification: An Investigation of Cartesian Procedure in the Theory of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 87 (3):442-445.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Matthias Steup (1992). Eplstemic Justification. Essays In the Theory of Knowledge, by William Alston. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):228-232.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  20
    John W. Bender (1988). Knowledge, Justification and Lehrer's Theory of Coherence. Philosophical Studies 54 (3):355 - 381.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  78
    Duncan Pritchard (2010). The Nature and Value of Knowledge: Three Investigations. Oxford University Press.
    The value problem -- Unpacking the value problem -- The swamping problem -- fundamental and non-fundamental epistemic goods -- The relevance of epistemic value monism -- Responding to the swamping problem I : the practical response -- Responding to the swamping problem II : the monistic response -- Responding to the swamping problem III : the pluralist response -- Robust virtue epistemology -- Knowledge and achievement -- Interlude : is robust virtue epistemology a reductive theory of knowledge? -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   68 citations  
  18. Frederick L. Will (1974). Induction and Justification an Investigation of Cartesian Procedure in the Philosophy of Knowledge. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Robert Audi (1993). The Structure of Justification. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of papers (including three completely new ones) by one of the foremost philosophers in epistemology transcends two of the most widely misunderstood positions in philosophy--foundationalism and coherentism. Audi proposes a distinctively moderate, internalist foundationalism that incorporates some of the virtues of both coherentism and reliabilism. He develops important distinctions between positive and negative epistemic dependence, substantively and conceptually naturalistic theories, dispositional beliefs and dispositions to believe, episodically and structurally inferential beliefs, first and second order internalism, and rebutting as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  20.  85
    Robert J. Fogelin (1994). Pyrrhonian Reflections on Knowledge and Justification. Oxford University Press.
    This work, written from a neo-Pyrrhonian perspective, is an examination of contemporary theories of knowledge and justification. It takes ideas primarily found in Sextus Empiricus's Outlines of Pyrrhonism, restates them in a modern idiom, and then asks whether any contemporary theory of knowledge meets the challenges they raise. The first part, entitled "Gettier and the Problem of Knowledge," attempts to rescue our ordinary concept of knowledge from those philosophers who have assigned burdens to it that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  21. Keith Lehrer (1990). Theory of Knowledge. Routledge.
    In this important new text, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the accepted definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories as well as recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful examination and concludes that external factors must (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  22.  17
    Nikola Grahek (2003). Austin and the Very Idea of the Theory of Knowledge. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):145-153.
    Austin’s destructive contextualist criticism of the theory of knowledge, as grounded on foundationalism, is presented. It is claimed that incorrigibility is not a secondary issue for the foundationalist conception of knowledge and justification, even if the hallmark of foundationalism is not to be sought in the so-called ‘quest for certainty’, but rather in the idea of epistemological realism.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  32
    Elke Brendel (1999). Coherence Theory of Knowledge: A Gradational Account. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 50 (2-3):293-307.
    A satisfactory theory of knowledge in which the shortcomings of a pure externalist account are avoided and in which the Gettier problem is solved should consist in a combination of externalist and internalist components. The internalist component should guarantee that the epistemic subject has cognitive access to the justifying grounds of her belief. And the externalist component should guarantee that the justification of her belief does not depend on any false statement. Keith Lehrer's coherence theory of knowledge (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  24.  32
    William E. Morris (1990). Knowledge and the Regularity Theory of Information. Synthese 82 (3):375-398.
    Fred Dretske's "Knowledge and the Flow of Information" is an extended attempt to develop a philosophically useful theory of information. Dretske adapts central ideas from Shannon and Weaver's mathematical theory of communication, and applies them to some traditional problems in epistemology. In doing so, he succeeds in building for philosophers a much-needed bridge to important work in cognitive science. The pay-off for epistemologists is that Dretske promises a way out of a long-standing impasse -- the Gettier problem. He offers (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Paul K. Moser, Dwayne H. Mulder & J. D. Trout (1997). The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction explains the main ideas and problems of contemporary epistemology while avoiding technical detail. Comprehensive and rich in illustrations and examples, it highlights contemporary debates over the definition, sources, and limits of human knowledge, and covers major topics including the nature of belief, theories of truth, epistemic justification, the Gettier problem, skepticism, and epistemic rationality. Its discussions identify important connections between traditional epistemological questions and cognitive science, the history of science, the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Keith Lehrer (2009). Theory of Knowledge. Routledge.
    In this important new text, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the accepted definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories as well as recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful examination and concludes that external factors must (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Keith Lehrer (2016). Theory of Knowledge. Routledge.
    In this important new text, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the accepted definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories as well as recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful examination and concludes that external factors must (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Noah Lemos (2007). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Epistemology or the theory of knowledge is one of the cornerstones of analytic philosophy, and this book provides a clear and accessible introduction to the subject. It discusses some of the main theories of justification, including foundationalism, coherentism, reliabilism, and virtue epistemology. Other topics include the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, skepticism, the problem of epistemic circularity, the problem of the criterion, a priori knowledge, and naturalized epistemology. Intended primarily for students taking a first class in epistemology, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Noah Lemos (2012). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Epistemology or the theory of knowledge is one of the cornerstones of analytic philosophy, and this book provides a clear and accessible introduction to the subject. It discusses some of the main theories of justification, including foundationalism, coherentism, reliabilism, and virtue epistemology. Other topics include the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, skepticism, the problem of epistemic circularity, the problem of the criterion, a priori knowledge, and naturalized epistemology. Intended primarily for students taking a first class in epistemology, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity.
    _An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge_ guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both _a priori_ and _a posteriori_ knowledge. Parts (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  26
    John W. Bender (1992). Unreckoned Misleading Truths and Lehrer's Theory of Undefeated Justification. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:465-481.
    According to Keith Lehrer’s coherence theory, knowledge is true acceptance whose justification is undefeated by a falsehood. It has recently become clear that Lehrer’s handling of important Gettier-inspired problems depends upon his position that only falsehoods accepted by the subject can act as defeaters of knowledge. I argue against this and present an example in which an unreckoned truth---one neither believed nor believed to be false by the subject---defeats knowledge. I trace the negative implications of this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  6
    Yong Shik Hwang (2008). On the Basic Components of Knowledge Acquisition in Integral Theory. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:115-124.
    This paper is about comparison and appraisal of Ken Wilber’s theory of the “three components or strands of knowledge” set forth especially in his Eye to Eye and Mark Edwards’s “Integral Cycle of Knowledge” which attempts through its critique to integrate Wilber’s developmental and epistemological models. Realizing the problem of today’s scientism, Wilber introduces the concepts of the “three eyes”—the eye of flesh, of reason, and of contemplation—thusconceiving science in a broad sense. Then in order to secure verification (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Laurence BonJour (1985). The Structure of Empirical Knowledge. Harvard University Press.
    1 Knowledge and Justification This book is an investigation of one central problem which arises in the attempt to give a philosophical account of empirical ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   250 citations  
  34. Jong-ho Ha (1988). A Direct Attribution Theory of Perceptual Knowledge. Dissertation, Brown University
    My purposes in this dissertation are to defend Chisholm's direct attribution theory as a theory of reference and intentionality and to propose a revised version of that theory with respect to the problems of perception and epistemic justification in perceptual knowledge. The direct attribution theory of reference has a remarkable merit that it can solve some theoretical difficulties with other theories of reference and explain comprehensively our intentional acts. Although I accept Chisholm's viewpoint on reference and intentionality, however, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  86
    Jaakko Hintikka (2007). Socratic Epistemology: Explorations of Knowledge-Seeking by Questioning. Cambridge University Press.
    Most current work in epistemology deals with the evaluation and justification of information already acquired. In this book, Jaakko Hintikka instead discusses the more important problem of how knowledge is acquired in the first place. His model of information-seeking is the old Socratic method of questioning, which has been generalized and brought up-to-date through the logical theory of questions and answers that he has developed.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  36. Paul Artin Boghossian (2006). Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism. Oxford University Press.
    Relativist and constructivist conceptions of truth and knowledge have become orthodoxy in vast stretches of the academic world in recent times. In his long-awaited first book, Paul Boghossian critically examines such views and exposes their fundamental flaws. Boghossian focuses on three different ways of reading the claim that knowledge is socially constructed--one as a thesis about truth and two about justification. And he rejects all three. The intuitive, common-sense view is that there is a way the world (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   58 citations  
  37. Elijah Chudnoff (2011). What Should a Theory of Knowledge Do? Dialectica 65 (4):561-579.
    The Gettier Problem is the problem of revising the view that knowledge is justified true belief in a way that is immune to Gettier counter-examples. The “Gettier Problem problem”, according to Lycan, is the problem of saying what is misguided about trying to solve the Gettier Problem. In this paper I take up the Gettier Problem problem. I distinguish giving conditions that are necessary and sufficient for knowledge from giving conditions that explain why one knows when one does (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38. Robert J. Fogelin (1994). Pyrrhonian Reflections on Knowledge and Justification: Studies in the Foundation of a Theological Tradition. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This work, written from a neo-Pyrrhonian perspective, is an examination of contemporary theories of knowledge and justification. It takes ideas primarily found in Sextus Empiricus's Outlines of Pyrrhonism, restates them in a modern idiom, and then asks whether any contemporary theory of knowledge meets the challenges they raise. The first part, entitled "Gettier and the Problem of Knowledge," attempts to rescue our ordinary concept of knowledge from those philosophers who have assigned burdens to it that (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  95
    Michael Bergmann (2006). Justification Without Awareness: A Defense of Epistemic Externalism. Oxford University Press.
    Virtually all philosophers agree that for a belief to be epistemically justified, it must satisfy certain conditions. Perhaps it must be supported by evidence. Or perhaps it must be reliably formed. Or perhaps there are some other "good-making" features it must have. But does a belief's justification also require some sort of awareness of its good-making features? The answer to this question has been hotly contested in contemporary epistemology, creating a deep divide among its practitioners. Internalists, who tend to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   101 citations  
  40.  89
    Matthias Steup (ed.) (2001). Knowledge, Truth, and Duty: Essays on Epistemic Justification, Responsibility, and Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    This volume gathers eleven new and three previously unpublished essays that take on questions of epistemic justification, responsibility, and virtue. It contains the best recent work in this area by major figures such as Ernest Sosa, Robert Audi, Alvin Goldman, and Susan Haak.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  41. Laurence BonJour & Ernest Sosa (2003). Epistemic Justification: Internalism Vs. Externalism, Foundations Vs. Virtues. Blackwell Pub..
    The regress problem and foundationalism -- Externalist accounts of justification -- In search of coherentism -- Back to foundationalism -- The conceptualization of sensory experience and the problem of the external world -- Knowledge and justification -- Does knowledge have foundation -- Skepticism and the internal/external divide -- A virtue epistemology -- Reply to Sosa -- Reply to Bonjour.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   72 citations  
  42. Richard Foley, A Trial Separation Between the Theory of Knowledge and the Theory of Justified Belief.
    In his 1963 article, “Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?”1 Edmund Gettier devised a pair of counterexamples designed to illustrate that knowledge cannot be adequately defined as justified true belief. The basic idea behind both of his counterexamples is that one can be justified in believing a falsehood P from which one deduces a truth Q, in which case one has a justified true belief in Q but does not know Q. Gettier’s article inspired numerous other counterexamples, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  43
    JeeLoo Liu, Philosophy 470: Theory of Knowledge.
    Course Description: This course is intended to stimulate the student to reflect philosophically on the nature of knowledge by surveying several prominent topics of concern to contemporary (i.e., 20th century) philosophers of the analytic tradition. Topics include the concept of knowledge, theories of justification, and the possibility of knowledge or its impossibility (skepticism). Although concentrated on problems surrounding the concept of knowledge, the course should further the student's understanding of the general methods of analytic philosophy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    Jonathan Harrison (1981). Hume's Theory of Justice. Oxford University Press.
    A Treatise of Human Nature was published between 1739 and 1740. Book I, entitled Of the Understanding, contains Hume's epistemology, i.e., his account of the manner in which we acquire knowledge in general, its justification (to the extent that he thought it could be justified), and its limits. Book II, entitled Of the Passions, expounds most of what could be called Hume's philosophy of psychology in general, and his moral psychology (including discussions of the problem of the freedom (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45. Robert Stern (2000). Transcendental Arguments and Scepticism: Answering the Question of Justification. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Stern investigates how scepticism can be countered by using transcendental arguments concerning the necessary conditions for the possibility of experience, language, or thought. He shows that the most damaging sceptical questions concern neither the certainty of our beliefs nor the reliability of our belief-forming methods, but rather how we can justify our beliefs.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  46.  47
    Jeremy Fantl (2009). Knowledge in an Uncertain World. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Fallibilism -- Contextualism -- Knowledge and reasons -- Justification -- Belief -- The value and importance of knowledge -- Infallibilism or pragmatic encroachment? -- Appendix I: Conflicts with bayesian decision theory? -- Appendix II: Does KJ entail infallibilism?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   96 citations  
  47.  29
    Gereon Wolters (2009). The Epistemological Roots of Ecclesiastical Claims to Knowledge. Axiomathes 19 (4):481-508.
    In theoretical matters, ecclesiastical claims to knowledge have lead to various conflicts with science. Claims in orientational matters, sometimes connected to attempts to establish them as a rule for legislation, have often been in conflict with the justified claims of non-believers. In addition they violate the Principle of Autonomy of the individual, which is at the very heart of European identity so decisively shaped by the Enlightenment. The Principle of Autonomy implies that state legislation should not interfere in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  37
    Heimir Geirsson (2002). Justification and Ways of Believing. Disputatio 12:1 - 11.
    One of the issues that has been hotly discussed in connection with the direct designation theory is whether or not coreferential names can be substituted salva veritate in epistemic contexts. Some direct designation theorists believe that they can be so substituted. Some direct designation theorists and all Fregeans and neo-Fregeans believe that they cannot be so substituted. Fregeans of various stripes have used their intuition against free substitution to argue against the direct designation theory. Some direct designation theorists have used (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. W. J. Talbott (1990). The Reliability of the Cognitive Mechanism: A Mechanist Account of Empirical Justification. Garland.
    First Published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50. George Sotiros Pappas & Marshall Swain (eds.) (1978). Essays on Knowledge and Justification. Cornell University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
1 — 50 / 401