Search results for 'Justin Brody' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Justin Brody & M. C. Laskowski (2012). On Rational Limits of Shelah—Spencer Graphs. Journal of Symbolic Logic 77 (2):580-592.score: 240.0
    Given a sequence {a n } in (0,1) converging to a rational, we examine the model theoretic properties of structures obtained as limits of Shelah-Spencer graphs G(m, m -αn ). We show that in most cases the model theory is either extremely well-behaved or extremely wild, and characterize when each occurs.
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  2. Baruch Brody (1976). Page 8 Hume, Reid, and Kant on Causality/Brody. In Stephen Francis Barker & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), Thomas Reid: Critical Interpretations. University City Science Center. 3--8.score: 180.0
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  3. R. G. Justin (2000). Compassionate Physicians-Renate G. Justin Replies. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):4-4.score: 180.0
     
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  4. Irenaeus Justin (2009). Early Christian Philosophers: Justin, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian Eric Osborn1. In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 3--187.score: 180.0
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  5. F. G. Miller & H. Brody (2003). Clinical Equipoise and the Therapeutic Misconception-Miller and Brody Reply. Hastings Center Report 33 (5):7-7.score: 180.0
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  6. Baruch A. Brody (2010). Traditional Knowledge and Intellectual Property. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (3):231-249.score: 60.0
    In a recent article (Brody 2010), I analyzed the debates surrounding charges of biopiracy, that is, charges that developed countries use biotechnology patents to expropriate the biological/genetic heritage of less developed countries. Such charges often are accompanied by the additional charge that biotechnology patents are used to expropriate the traditional knowledge about the use of these resources possessed by indigenous communities in less developed countries. It is this second charge that is the focus of this essay, which will develop (...)
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  7. Baruch Brody (1972). Thomson on Abortion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):335-340.score: 30.0
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  8. Michael Brody (1998). The Minimalist Program and a Perfect Syntax: A Critical Notice of Noam Chomsky's the Minimalist Program. Mind and Language 13 (2):205–214.score: 30.0
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  9. Baruch A. Brody (1973). Why Settle for Anything Less Than Good Old-Fashioned Aristotelian Essentialism. Noûs 7 (4):351-365.score: 30.0
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  10. Baruch A. Brody (1998). The Ethics of Biomedical Research: An International Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    A broad critical review of national policies on biomedical research - human, epidemiologic, clinical trials, genetic, reproductive, etc.
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  11. Baruch A. Brody (2007). Intellectual Property and Biotechnology: The European Debate. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):69-110.score: 30.0
    : The European patent system allows for the introduction of moral issues into decisions about the granting of patents. This feature has greatly impacted European debates about the patenting of biotechnology. This essay explores the European experience, in both the European Union and the European Patent Organization. It argues that there has been great confusion surrounding these issues primarily because the Europeans have not developed a general theory about when exclusion from patentability is the best social mechanism for dealing with (...)
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  12. F. G. Miller & H. Brody (2011). Understanding and Harnessing Placebo Effects: Clearing Away the Underbrush. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):69-78.score: 30.0
    Despite strong growth in scientific investigation of the placebo effect, understanding of this phenomenon remains deeply confused. We investigate critically seven common conceptual distinctions that impede clear understanding of the placebo effect: (1) verum/placebo, (2) active/inactive, (3) signal/noise, (4) specific/nonspecific, (5) objective/subjective, (6) disease/illness, and (7) intervention/context. We argue that some of these should be eliminated entirely, whereas others must be used with caution to avoid bias. Clearing away the conceptual underbrush is needed to lay down a path to understanding (...)
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  13. B. A. Brody (1967). Natural Kinds and Real Essences. Journal of Philosophy 64 (14):431-446.score: 30.0
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  14. B. A. Brody (1971). Abortion and the Law. Journal of Philosophy 68 (12):357-369.score: 30.0
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  15. Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody (2002). What Makes Placebo-Controlled Trials Unethical? American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):3 – 9.score: 30.0
    The leading ethical position on placebo-controlled clinical trials is that whenever proven effective treatment exists for a given condition, it is unethical to test a new treatment for that condition against placebo. Invoking the principle of clinical equipoise, opponents of placebo-controlled trials in the face of proven effective treatment argue that they (1) violate the therapeutic obligation of physicians to offer optimal medical care and (2) lack both scientific and clinical merit. We contend that both of these arguments are mistaken. (...)
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  16. Baruch A. Brody (1972). De Re and de Dicto Interpretations of Modal Logic or a Return to an Aristotelean Essentialism. Philosophia 2 (1-2):117-136.score: 30.0
  17. Franklin G. Miller, Howard Brody & Kevin C. Chung (2000). Cosmetic Surgery and the Internal Morality of Medicine. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (03):353-364.score: 30.0
    Cosmetic surgery is a fast-growing medical practice. In 1997 surgeons in the United States performed the four most common cosmetic procedures443,728 times, an increase of 150% over the comparable total for 1992. Estimated total expenditures for cosmetic surgery range from $1 to $2 billion. As managed care cuts into physicians' income and autonomy, cosmetic surgery, which is not covered by health insurance, offers a financially attractive medical specialty.
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  18. Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody (2007). Clinical Equipoise and the Incoherence of Research Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):151 – 165.score: 30.0
    The doctrine of clinical equipoise is appealing because it appears to permit physicians to maintain their therapeutic obligation to offer optimal medical care to patients while conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The appearance, however, is deceptive. In this article we argue that clinical equipoise is defective and incoherent in multiple ways. First, it conflates the sound methodological principle that RCTs should begin with an honest null hypothesis with the questionable ethical norm that participants in these trials should never be randomized (...)
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  19. Baruch Brody (1974). An Impersonal Theory of Personal Identity. Philosophical Studies 26 (5-6):313 - 329.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I defend the view that the identity of indiscernibles could serve as an adequate basis for a general theory of identity. I then show how a theory of essentialism forces one to modify that general theory. In light of both the original and modified theory, I offer a new resolution of some of the classical and contemporary problems of personal identity.
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  20. Stuart Brody (1997). Vaginas Yield Far More Pleasure Than Pain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):442-443.score: 30.0
    berkley's pathogen model of sex differences in pain is inconsistent with women outliving men by several years. The vagina is far more resistant to pathogens than is the rectum. Vaginal stimulation produces intense analgesia in rats and humans. Possible evolutionary and cardiovascular factors are also noted.
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  21. Baruch A. Brody (2010). Intellectual Property, State Sovereignty, and Biotechnology. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (1):pp. 51-73.score: 30.0
  22. Baruch A. Brody (2006). Intellectual Property and Biotechnology: The U.S. Internal Experience--Part I. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):1-37.score: 30.0
    : In the development of biotechnology in the United States, many questions were raised about the appropriateness of applying to this area a traditional robust system of intellectual property rights. Despite these hesitations, the U.S. rejected suggested modifications. This was a mistake, and there is a need to develop a modified system that promotes more of the relevant ethical values.
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  23. Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody (2001). The Internal Morality of Medicine: An Evolutionary Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):581 – 599.score: 30.0
    A basic question of medical ethics is whether the norms governing medical practice should be understood as the application of principles and rules of the common morality to medicine or whether some of these norms are internal or proper to medicine. In this article we describe and defend an evolutionary perspective on the internal morality of medicine that is defined in terms of the goals of clinical medicine and a set of duties that constrain medical practice in pursuit of these (...)
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  24. Baruch A. Brody (2002). Freedom and Responsibility in Genetic Testing. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):343-359.score: 30.0
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  25. B. A. Brody (1973). Abortion and the Sanctity of Human Life. American Philosophical Quarterly 10 (2):133 - 140.score: 30.0
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  26. Boruch A. Brody (1967). The Equivalence of Act and Rule Utilitarianism. Philosophical Studies 18 (6):81 - 87.score: 30.0
  27. B. A. Brody (1968). Confirmation and Explanation. Journal of Philosophy 65 (10):282-299.score: 30.0
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  28. Baruch A. Brody (1971). Is There a Philosophical Problem About the Identity of Substances? Philosophia 1 (1-2):43-59.score: 30.0
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  29. Baruch A. Brody (1979). Kripke on Proper Names. In A. French Peter, E. Uehling Theodore, Howard Jr & K. Wettstein (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives in the Philosophy of Language. University of Minnesota Press. 64-69.score: 30.0
    Kripke has argued that proper names, as rigid designators, cannot be equivalent in meaning to definite descriptions. in this paper, i argue that definite descriptions are sometimes used rigidly and that proper names are equivalent to definite descriptions used rigidly.
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  30. Howard Brody (1987). The Physician-Patient Relationship: Models and Criticisms. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2).score: 30.0
    A review of the philosophical debate on theoretical models for the physician-patient relationship over the past fifteen years may point to some of the more productive questions for future research. Contractual models have been criticized for promoting a legalistic and minimalistic image of the relationship, such that another form of model (such as convenant) is required. Shifting from a contractual to a contractarian model (in keeping with Rawls' notion of an original position) provides an adequate response to many criticisms of (...)
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  31. Michael Brody (1987). On Chomsky's Knowledge of Language. Mind and Language 2 (2):165-177.score: 30.0
  32. Howard Brody (2011). Clarifying Conflict of Interest. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):23 - 28.score: 30.0
    As the debate over how to manage or discourage physicians? financial conflicts of interest with the drug and medical device industries has become more heated, critics have questioned or dismissed the concept of ?conflict of interest? itself. A satisfactory definition relates conflict of interest to concerns about maintaining social trust and distinguishes between breaches of ethical duty and temptations to breach duty. Numerous objections to such a definition have been offered, none of which prevails on further analysis. Those concerned about (...)
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  33. Howard Brody (2006). Family Medicine, the Physician-Patient Relationship, and Patient-Centered Care. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):38 – 39.score: 30.0
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  34. Gale Justin (2005). Identification and Definition in the Lysis. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (1):75-104.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I make a case for interpreting the Lysis as a dialogue of definition, designed to answer the question of “What is a friend?” The main innovation of my interpretation is the contention – and this is argued for in the paper – that Socrates hints towards a definition of being a friend that applies equally to mutual friendship and one-way attraction – the two kinds of friend relation very clearly identified by Socrates in the dialogue. The key (...)
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  35. B. A. Brody (1971). On the Ontological Priority of Physical Objects. Noûs 5 (2):139-155.score: 30.0
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  36. Baruch A. Brody (1979). Intuitions and Objective Moral Knowledge. The Monist 62 (4):446-456.score: 30.0
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  37. Susan D. McCammon & Howard Brody (2012). How Virtue Ethics Informs Medical Professionalism. HEC Forum 24 (4):257-272.score: 30.0
    We argue that a turn toward virtue ethics as a way of understanding medical professionalism represents both a valuable corrective and a missed opportunity. We look at three ways in which a closer appeal to virtue ethics could help address current problems or issues in professionalism education—first, balancing professionalism training with demands for professional virtues as a prerequisite; second, preventing demands for the demonstrable achievement of competencies from working against ideal professionalism education as lifelong learning; and third, avoiding temptations to (...)
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  38. Baruch A. Brody (1987). Justice and Competitive Markets. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (1):37-50.score: 30.0
    This easy challenges the view that the provision of health care must take place within a competitive-free system. The author argues that, presuming that there is a requirement to meet the demands of those who cannot pay for health care, a competitive market provides a good way to deal with injustices within the health care system. The author concludes that the demands for justice are best met when indigent individuals use some portion of the funds they receive from the government (...)
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  39. Howard Brody & Franklin G. Miller (1998). The Internal Morality of Medicine: Explication and Application to Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (4):384 – 410.score: 30.0
    Some ethical issues facing contemporary medicine cannot be fully understood without addressing medicine's internal morality. Medicine as a profession is characterized by certain moral goals and morally acceptable means for achieving those goals. The list of appropriate goals and means allows some medical actions to be classified as clear violations of the internal morality, and others as borderline or controversial cases. Replies are available for common objections, including the superfluity of internal morality for ethical analysis, the argument that internal morality (...)
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  40. Howard Brody (1985). Philosophy of Medicine and Other Humanities: Toward a Wholistic View. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 30.0
    A less analytic and more wholistic approach to philosophy, described as best overall fit or seeing how things all hang together, is defended in recent works by John Rawls and Richard Rorty and can usefully be applied to problems in philosophy of medicine. Looking at sickness and its impact upon the person as a central problem for philosophy of medicine, this approach discourages a search for necessary and sufficient conditions for being sick, and instead encourages a listing of true and (...)
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  41. Howard Brody (2006). Are There Three or Four Distinct Types of Medical Practice? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):51 – 53.score: 30.0
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  42. Baruch Brody (1983). Redistribution Without Egalitarianism. Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (01):71-.score: 30.0
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  43. Howard Brody (2007). Transparency and Self-Censorship in Shared Decision-Making. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):44-46.score: 30.0
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  44. Baruch A. Brody (1983). The Use of Halakhic Material in Discussions of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (3):317-328.score: 30.0
    In this paper questions are raised about the use of Halakhic material discussions of medical ethics. Three ways in which one might use Halakhic material in such discussions are distinguishes: (a) as a source for ideas about medical ethics which can be defended independently of their origin; (b) as a basis for mandating certain forms of behaviour for members of the Jewish faith; (c) as the basis for claims about the Jewish view on disputed topics in medical ethics. The first (...)
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  45. Allen E. Buchanan, Andrea Califano, Jeffrey Kahn, Elizabeth McPherson, John A. Robertson & Baruch A. Brody (2002). Pharmacogenetics: Ethical Issues and Policy Options. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):1-15.score: 30.0
    : Pharmacogenetics offers the prospect of an era of safer and more effective drugs, as well as more individualized use of drug therapies. Before the benefits of pharmacogenetics can be realized, the ethical issues that arise in research and clinical application of pharmacogenetic technologies must be addressed. The ethical issues raised by pharmacogenetics can be addressed under six headings: (1) regulatory oversight, (2) confidentiality and privacy, (3) informed consent, (4) availability of drugs, (5) access, and (6) clinicians' changing responsibilities in (...)
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  46. Michael Brody & Anna Szabolcsi (2003). Overt Scope in Hungarian. Syntax 6 (1).score: 30.0
    The focus of this paper is the syntax of inverse scope in Hungarian, a language that largely disambiguates quantifier scope at spell-out. Inverse scope is attributed to alternate orderings of potentially large chunks of structure, but with appeal to base-generation, as opposed to nonfeature-driven movement as in Kayne 1998. The proposal is developed within mirror theory and conforms to the assumption that structures are antisymmetrical. The paper also develops a matching notion of scope in terms of featural domination, as opposed (...)
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  47. Nathan Brody & Paul Oppenheim (1969). Application of Bohr's Principle of Complementarity to the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of Philosophy 66 (4):97-113.score: 30.0
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  48. Jules Brody (1998). Montaigne: Philosophy, Philology, Literature. Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):83-107.score: 30.0
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  49. B. A. Brody (1972). Towards an Aristotelean Theory of Scientific Explanation. Philosophy of Science 39 (1):20-31.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I consider a variety of objections against the covering-law model of scientific explanation, show that Aristotle was already aware of them and had solutions for them, and argue that these solutions are correct. These solutions involve the notions of nonHumean causality and of essential properties. There are a great many familiar objections, both methodological and epistemological, to introducing these concepts into the methodology of science, but I show that these objections are based upon misunderstandings of these concepts.
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  50. Howard Brody & Margaret Wardlaw (2008). Two Gorillas in the Death Penalty Room. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):53 – 54.score: 30.0
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