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Profile: Justin Smith (Eastern University)
  1.  16
    Mogens Laerke, Justin E. H. Smith & Eric Schliesser (eds.) (2013). Philosophy and Its History: Aims and Methods in the Study of Early Modern Philosophy. OUP USA.
    This volume collects contributions from leading scholars of early modern philosophy from a wide variety of philosophical and geographic backgrounds. The distinguished contributors offer very different, competing approaches to the history of philosophy.
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  2.  14
    Justin E. H. Smith, Tradition, Culture, and the Problem of Inclusion in Philosophy.
    Many today agree that philosophy, as an academic discipline, must, for the sake of its very survival, become more inclusive of a wider range of perspectives, coming from a more diverse pool of philosophers. Yet there has been little serious reflection on how our very idea of what philosophy is might be preventing this change from taking place. In this essay I would like to consider the ways in which our ideas about philosophy's relation to tradition, and its relation to (...)
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  3. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Introduction. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 1-22.
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  4. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press.
    Though it did not yet exist as a discrete field of scientific inquiry, biology was at the heart of many of the most important debates in seventeenth-century philosophy. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the work of G. W. Leibniz. In Divine Machines, Justin Smith offers the first in-depth examination of Leibniz's deep and complex engagement with the empirical life sciences of his day, in areas as diverse as medicine, physiology, taxonomy, generation theory, and paleontology. He shows how these (...)
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  5.  14
    Justin E. H. Smith (2013). Reply to Sarah Tietz. The Leibniz Review 23:129-131.
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  6. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Preface. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press
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  7.  9
    Justin E. H. Smith (2014). Natives, Nature, and Natural Slavery. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):81-100.
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  8.  9
    Justin E. H. Smith (2007). The Body-Machine in Leibniz's Early Physiological and Medical Writings: A Selection of Texts with Commentary. The Leibniz Review:141-179.
    Other than the historical writings, the edition of which has yet to begin, Series VIII of the Academy Edition of Leibniz’s writings, presenting his “natural-scientific, medical, and technical” contributions, has been, since the project began in 1923, consistently deemed to be of low priority, and it is only very recently that the project has got fully underway. Coming, as it does, nearer to the end of the edition of the complete works, Series VIII has the advantage of accumulating some of (...)
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  9.  25
    Justin E. H. Smith (2003). Confused Perception and Corporeal Substance in Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 13:45-64.
    I argue against the view that Leibniz’s construction of reality out of perceiving substances must be seen as the first of the modern idealist philosophies. I locate this central feature of Leibniz’s thought instead in a decidedly premodern tradition. This tradition sees bodiliness as a consequence of the confused perception of finite substances, and equates God’s uniquely disembodied being with his maximally distinct perceptions. But unlike modern idealism, the premodern view takes confusion as the very feature of any created substance (...)
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  10.  22
    Justin E. H. Smith (2006). Leibniz and the Natural World. The Leibniz Review 16:73-84.
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  11.  19
    Justin E. H. Smith (2012). “Curious Kinks of the Human Mind”: Cognition, Natural History, and the Concept of Race. Perspectives on Science 20 (4):504-529.
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  12.  28
    Justin E. H. Smith (2007). Leibniz on Spermatozoa and Immortality. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (3):264-282.
    In this article, I consider the significance of the discovery of spermatozoa for Leibniz's deeply held beliefs that (i) no true substance can ever be generated or destroyed, except miraculously; and (ii) that every substance must be perpetually organically embodied. I further consider the way these beliefs are transformed as Leibniz's basic middle-period commitment to corporeal substance gives way (though not entirely) to a metaphysics of monadological immaterialsm. What endures throughout, I show, is the conviction that whatever is real must (...)
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  13.  17
    Justin E. H. Smith (2005). The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):391-394.
  14.  14
    Justin E. H. Smith (2010). Leibniz, le Vivant Et L'Organisme. The Leibniz Review 20:85-96.
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  15.  19
    Justin E. H. Smith (2010). Leibniz Und Das Judentum. Studia Leibnitiana Sonderhefte. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):344 – 347.
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  16.  11
    Justin E. H. Smith (2007). The Body-Machine in Leibniz's Early Physiological and Medical Writings. The Leibniz Review 17:141-179.
    Other than the historical writings, the edition of which has yet to begin, Series VIII of the Academy Edition of Leibniz’s writings, presenting his “natural-scientific, medical, and technical” contributions, has been, since the project began in 1923, consistently deemed to be of low priority, and it is only very recently that the project has got fully underway. Coming, as it does, nearer to the end of the edition of the complete works, Series VIII has the advantage of accumulating some of (...)
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  17.  9
    Justin E. H. Smith (2005). Making Sense of the U.S. Prison Industry. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (1):83-96.
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  18.  16
    Justin E. H. Smith (2009). “The Unity of the Generative Power”: Modern Taxonomy and the Problem of Animal Generation. Perspectives on Science 17 (1):pp. 78-104.
    Much recent scholarly treatment of the theoretical and practical underpinnings of biological taxonomy from the 16 th to the 18 th centuries has failed to adequately consider the importance of the mode of generation of some living entity in the determination of its species membership, as well as in the determination of the ontological profile of the species itself. In this article, I show how a unique set of considerations was brought to bear in the classification of creatures whose species (...)
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  19.  9
    Justin E. H. Smith (2012). Diet, Embodiment, and Virtue in the Mechanical Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):338-348.
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  20.  4
    Justin E. H. Smith (2004). Beyond Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):398-401.
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  21.  3
    Justin E. H. Smith (2007). La Génération Spontanée Et le Problème de la Reproduction des Espèces Avant Et Après Descartes. Philosophiques 34 (2):273-294.
    Dans cet article je mets en évidence quelques problèmes conceptuels importants posés par le prétendu phénomène de la génération spontanée, en montrant comment ils étaient liés historiquement à la question théorique des origines et de l’ontologie des espèces biologiques. Au XVIe et XVIIe siècle tout particulièrement, la possibilité que des formes organiques soient générées dans la matière inorganique supposait la possibilité que le hasard gouverne non seulement l’apparition d’une anguille ou d’une souris, mais qu’il gouverne l’apparition originelle de leurs espèces (...)
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  22.  2
    Justin E. H. Smith (2008). Leibniz and the Natural World : Activity, Passivity and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz's Philosophy. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review:73-84.
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  23.  1
    Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Appendix 2. The Animal Machine. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 288-289.
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  24.  1
    Justin E. H. Smith (2004). Beyond Philosophy: Ethics, History, Marxism, and Liberation Theology. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):398-401.
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  25.  1
    Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Five. The Divine Preformation Of Organic Bodies. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 165-196.
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  26.  2
    Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Daniel Garber.Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xxii+428. $55.00. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):153-157.
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  27.  1
    Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Seven. The Nature And Boundaries Of Biological Species. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 235-274.
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  28. François Duchesneau & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2016). The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy. Yale University Press.
    Editors François Duchesneau and Justin E. H. Smith offer readers the first fully annotated English translation of the eighteenth-century correspondence commonly known as the Leibniz-Stahl controversy. The written exchange of opposing philosophical views on divine action, the order of nature, causality and teleology, and the relationship of the soul to the body that took place from 1709 to 1711 between the mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Georg Ernst Stahl, a chemist and physician at the court of King Friedrich (...)
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  29.  7
    Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2014). The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. OUP Usa.
    This volume explores the intersection between early modern philosophy and the life sciences by presenting the contributions of important but often neglected figures such as Cudworth, Grew, Glisson, Hieronymus Fabricius, Stahl, Gallego, Hartsoeker, and More, as well as familiar figures such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Kant.
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  30. Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2014). The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The present volume advances a recent historiographical turn towards the intersection of early modern philosophy and the life sciences by bringing together many of its leading scholars to present the contributions of important but often neglected figures, such as Ralph Cudworth, Nehemiah Grew, Francis Glisson, Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Georg Ernst Stahl, Juan Gallego de la Serna, Nicholas Hartsoeker, Henry More, as well as more familiar figures such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Kant. The contributions to this volume are (...)
     
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  31. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Abbreviations. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press
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  32. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Appendix 1. Directions Pertaining to the Institution of Medicine. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 275-287.
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  33. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Appendix 4. On Writing the New Elements of Medicine. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 297-302.
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  34. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Appendix 5. On Botanical Method. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 303-310.
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  35. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Appendix 3. The Human Body, Like That of Any Animal, is a Sort of Machine. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 290-296.
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  36. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Bibliography. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 357-374.
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  37. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Contents. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press
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  38. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Four. Organic Bodies, Part II: Context and Legacy. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 137-162.
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  39. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter One. “Que Les Philosophes Medicinassent”. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 25-58.
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  40. Justin E. H. Smith (2003). Confused Perception and Corporeal Substance in Leibniz. Leibniz Society Review 13:45-64.
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  41. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Six. Games of Nature, the Emergence of Organic Form, and the Problem of Spontaneity. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 197-232.
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  42. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Three. Organic Bodies, Part I. Nature and Structure. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 97-136.
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  43. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Chapter Two. The “Hydraulico-Pneumaticopyrotechnical Machine of Quasi-Perpetual Motion”. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 59-94.
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  44. Justin E. H. Smith (2012). Diet, Embodiment, and Virtue in the Mechanical Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):338-348.
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  45. Justin E. H. Smith (ed.) (forthcoming). Embodiment, Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford.
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  46. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Index. In Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press 375-380.
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  47. Justin E. H. Smith (2006). Imagination and the Problem of Heredity in Mechanist Embryology. In The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
  48. Justin E. H. Smith (2006). Leibniz and the Natural World. Leibniz Society Review 16:73-84.
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  49. Justin E. H. Smith (2010). Leibniz, le vivant et l’organisme. Leibniz Society Review 20:85-96.
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  50. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Machines, Souls, and Vital Principles. In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. OUP Oxford
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