Search results for 'Justin Good' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Justin Good (2006). Wittgenstein and the Theory of Perception. Continuum.score: 240.0
    A philosphical exploration of perception explores Wittgenstein's work on visual meaning and his analysis of the concept of "seeing.".
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  2. I. J. Good (1982). A Good Explanation of an Event is Not Necessarily Corroborated by the Event. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):251-253.score: 210.0
    It is shown by means of a simple example that a good explanation of an event is not necessarily corroborated by the occurrence of that event. It is also shown that this contention follows symbolically if an explanation having higher "explicativity" than another is regarded as better.
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  3. Irving J. Good (1983). Good Thinking: The Foundations of Probability and its Applications. Univ Minnesota Pr.score: 210.0
    ... Press for their editorial perspicacity, to the National Institutes of Health for the partial financial support they gave me while I was writing some of the chapters, and to Donald Michie for suggesting the title Good Thinking.
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  4. I. J. Good (1962). Errata and Corrigenda for Good and Good. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):88.score: 180.0
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  5. R. G. Justin (2000). Compassionate Physicians-Renate G. Justin Replies. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):4-4.score: 180.0
     
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  6. Irenaeus Justin (2009). Early Christian Philosophers: Justin, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian Eric Osborn1. In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 3--187.score: 180.0
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  7. David Robjant (2012). Good, Evil and the Virtuous Iris Murdoch Commentary Iris Murdoch, Philosopher, Edited by Justin Broackes . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 400 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-928990-5 Hb £35.00. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):621-635.score: 120.0
    While Iris Murdoch lived, Charles Taylor found philosophers as yet ‘too close’ to her rich philosophical contribution to see its true importance (Taylor 1996: 3). Twelve years from her death, Iris Murdoch, Philosopher is the first collection of essays on Murdoch’s philosophy edited by a philosopher, for a readership in academic philosophy. The collection is not yet the fulfilment of Taylor’s prophecy, but has the energy of a giant leap.
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  8. Leonard Rubenstein (2011). Sharrock, Justine. 2010. Tortured: When Good Soldiers Do Bad Things. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):203-205.score: 40.0
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  9. Justin Jeffrey (2009). A Theory of Virtue: Excellence in Being for the Good. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (4):538-540.score: 36.0
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  10. O. P. Brophy & Justin Marie (2011). Good and Evil Actions. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):499-500.score: 36.0
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  11. Colin W. G. Clifford, Ehsan Arabzadeh & Justin A. Harris (2008). A Good Bet to Measure Awareness? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (6):210.score: 36.0
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  12. Romanus & Justin Marie Brophy, O. P. (2011). Good and Evil Actions. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):499-500.score: 36.0
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  13. Rachel Barney (2008). The Carpenter and the Good. In D. Cairns, F. G. Herrmann & T. Penner (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. University of Edinburgh.score: 27.0
    Among Aristotle’s criticisms of the Form of the Good is his claim that the knowledge of such a Good could be of no practical relevance to everyday rational agency, e.g. on the part of craftspeople. This critique turns out to hinge ultimately on the deeply different assumptions made by Plato and Aristotle about the relation of ‘good’ and ‘good for’. Plato insists on the conceptual priority of the former; and Plato wins the argument.
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  14. Graham Wood (2009). Detecting Design: Fast and Frugal or All Things Considered? Sophia 48 (2):195 - 210.score: 24.0
    Within the Cognitive Science of Religion, Justin Barrett has proposed that humans possess a hyperactive agency detection device that was selected for in our evolutionary past because ‘over detecting’ (as opposed to ‘under detecting’) the existence of a predator conferred a survival advantage. Within the Intelligent Design debate, William Dembski has proposed the law of small probability, which states that specified events of small probability do not occur by chance. Within the Fine-Tuning debate, John Leslie has asserted a tidiness (...)
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  15. Richard Kraut (2007). What is Good and Why: The Ethics of Well-Being. Harvard University Press.score: 24.0
    In search of good -- A Socratic question -- Flourishing and well-being -- Mind and value -- Utilitarianism -- Rawls and the priority of the right -- Right, wrong, should -- The elimination of moral rightness -- Rules and good -- Categorical imperatives -- Conflicting interests -- Whose good? The egoist's answer -- Whose good? The utilitarian's answer - Self-denial, self-love, universal concern -- Pain, self-love, and altruism -- Agent-neutrality and agent-relativity -- Good, conation, and (...)
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  16. Lara Denis (2005). Autonomy and the Highest Good. Kantian Review 10 (1):33-59.score: 24.0
    Kant’s ethics conceives of rational beings as autonomous–capable of legislating the moral law, and of motivating themselves to act out of respect for that law. Kant’s ethics also includes a notion of the highest good, the union of virtue with happiness proportional to, and consequent on, virtue. According to Kant, morality sets forth the highest good as an object of the totality of all things good as ends. Much about Kant’s conception of the highest good is (...)
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  17. Robert S. Taylor (2010). Kant's Political Religion: The Transparency of Perpetual Peace and the Highest Good. Review of Politics 72 (1):1-24.score: 24.0
    Scholars have long debated the relationship between Kant’s doctrine of right and his doctrine of virtue (including his moral religion or ethico-theology), which are the two branches of his moral philosophy. This article will examine the intimate connection in his practical philosophy between perpetual peace and the highest good, between political and ethico-religious communities, and between the types of transparency peculiar to each. It will show how domestic and international right provides a framework for the development of ethical communities, (...)
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  18. J. F. Humphrey (2009). “There is Good Hope That Death is a Blessing”. In Dennis Cooley & Lloyd Steffen (eds.), Innovative Dialogue. Probing the Boundaries: Re-Imagining Death and Dying. Interdisciplinary Press.score: 24.0
    In Plato’s Apology (29a-b), Socrates agues that he does not fear death; indeed, to fear death is a sign of ignorance. It is to claim to know what one in fact does not know (Ap. 29 a-b). Perhaps, Socrates suggests, death is not a great evil after all, but “the greatest of all goods.” At the end of the dialogue, after the judges have voted on the final verdict and Socrates has received the death penalty, the philosopher considers two common (...)
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  19. W. D. Ross (2002). The Right and the Good. Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    The Right and the Good, a classic of twentieth-century philosophy by the eminent scholar Sir David Ross, is now presented in a new edition with a substantial introduction by Philip Stratton-Lake, a leading expert on Ross. Ross's book is the pinnacle of ethical intuitionism, which was the dominant moral theory in British philosophy for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Intuitionism is now enjoying a considerable revival, and Stratton-Lake provides the context for a proper understanding of Ross's (...)
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  20. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.score: 24.0
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such preconditions, and how they (...)
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  21. Jacqueline Mariña & West Lafayette (2000). Making Sense of Kant's Highest Good. Kant-Studien 91 (3):329-355.score: 24.0
    This paper explores Kant's concept of the highest good and the postulate of the existence of God arising from it. Kant has two concepts of the highest good standing in tension with one another, an immanent and a transcendent one. I provide a systematic exposition of the constituents of both variants and show how Kant’s arguments are prone to confusion through a conflation of both concepts. I argue that once these confusions are sorted out Kant’s claim regarding the (...)
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  22. Guy Fletcher (2012). The Locative Analysis of Good For Formulated and Defended. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (JESP) 6 (1).score: 24.0
    THE STRUCTURE OF THIS PAPER IS AS FOLLOWS. I begin §1 by dealing with preliminary issues such as the different relations expressed by the “good for” locution. I then (§2) outline the Locative Analysis of good for and explain its main elements before moving on to (§3) outlining and discussing the positive features of the view. In the subsequent sections I show how the Locative Analysis can respond to objections from, or inspired by, Sumner (§4-5), Regan (§6), and (...)
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  23. Milena Ivanova (2010). Pierre Duhem's Good Sense as a Guide to Theory Choice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):58-64.score: 24.0
    This paper examines Duhem’s concept of good sense as an attempt to support a non rule-governed account of rationality in theory choice. Faced with the underdetermination of theory by evidence thesis and the continuity thesis, Duhem tried to account for the ability of scientists to choose theories that continuously grow to a natural classification. I will examine the concept of good sense and the problems that stem from it. I will also present a recent attempt by David Stump (...)
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  24. Lloyd P. Gerson (2008). From Plato's Good to Platonic God. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):93-112.score: 24.0
    One of the major puzzling themes in the history of Platonism is how theology is integrated with philosophy. In particular, one may well wonder how Plato's superordinate first principle of all, Idea of the Good, comes to be understood by his disciples as a mind or in some way possessing personal attributes. In what sense is the Good supposed to be God? In this paper I explore some Platonic accounts of the first principle of all in order to (...)
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  25. Milena Ivanova & Cedric Paternotte (2013). Theory Choice, Good Sense and Social Consensus. Erkenntnis 78 (5):1109-1132.score: 24.0
    There has been a significant interest in the recent literature in developing a solution to the problem of theory choice which is both normative and descriptive, but agent-based rather than rule-based, originating from Pierre Duhem’s notion of ‘good sense’. In this paper we present the properties Duhem attributes to good sense in different contexts, before examining its current reconstructions advanced in the literature and their limitations. We propose an alternative account of good sense, seen as promoting social (...)
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  26. Charles R. Pigden (1990). Geach on `Good'. Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):129-154.score: 24.0
    In his celebrated 'Good and Evil' (l956) Professor Geach argues as against the non-naturalists that ‘good’ is attributive and that the predicative 'good', as used by Moore, is senseless.. 'Good' when properly used is attributive. 'There is no such thing as being just good or bad, [that is, no predicative 'good'] there is only being a good or bad so and so'. On the other hand, Geach insists, as against non-cognitivists, that good-judgments (...)
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  27. Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Understanding What's Good for Us. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.score: 24.0
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying (...)
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  28. Barbro Fröding (2010). Cognitive Enhancement, Virtue Ethics and the Good Life. Neuroethics 4 (3):1-12.score: 24.0
    This article explores the respective roles that medical and technological cognitive enhancements, on the one hand, and the moral and epistemic virtues traditionally understood, on the other, can play in enabling us to lead the good life. It will be shown that neither the virtues nor cognitive enhancements (of the kind we have access to today or in the foreseeable future) on their own are likely to enable most people to lead the good life. While the moral and (...)
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  29. Roe Fremstedal (2011). The Concept of the Highest Good in Kierkegaard and Kant. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):155-171.score: 24.0
    This article tries to make sense of the concept of the highest good (eternal bliss) in Søren Kierkegaard by comparing it to the analysis of the highest good found in Immanuel Kant. The comparison with Kant’s more systematic analysis helps us clarify the meaning and importance of the concept in Kierkegaard as well as to shed new light on the conceptual relation between Kant and Kierkegaard. The article argues that the concept of the highest good is of (...)
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  30. John M. Armstrong (2006). Review of Gabriel Richardson Lear, Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Princeton University Press, 2004). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):206–209.score: 24.0
    I review Gabriel Richardson Lear's excellent essay on Aristotle’s conception of the human good. She solves some long-standing problems in the interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics by drawing on resources in his natural philosophy and Plato’s conception of love. Her interpretation is a compelling and, to my mind, largely true account of Aristotle’s view. In this review, I summarize the book's main argument and then explain two fundamental points on which I have concerns.
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  31. Joseph V. Carcello (2009). Governance and the Common Good. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):11 - 18.score: 24.0
    The importance of corporate governance in ensuring reliable financial reporting is examined in this article, and the roles of individuals involved in the governance process are examined from the perspective of ensuring the common good. Initially, adopting the positivist tradition that dominates the academic literature in accounting, the relations between financial reporting quality and the activities of senior management, the board of directors and its audit committee, and external auditors are examined. Unlike much of the academic literature, this article (...)
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  32. Lara Ostaric (2010). Works of Genius as Sensible Exhibitions of the Idea of the Highest Good. Kant-Studien 101 (1):22-39.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that, on Kant's view, the work of genius serves as a sensible exhibition of the Idea of the highest good. In other words, the work of genius serves as a special sign that the world is hospitable to our moral ends and that the realization of our moral vocation in such a world may indeed be possible. In the first part of the paper, I demonstrate that the purpose of the highest good is (...)
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  33. Ralph Wedgwood (2009). The "Good" and the "Right" Revisited. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):499-519..score: 24.0
    Moral philosophy has long been preoccupied by a supposed dichotomy between the "good" and the "right". This dichotomy has been taken to define certain allegedly central issues for ethics. How are the good and the right related to each other? For example, is one of the two (as many philosophers have put it) "prior" to the other? If so, is the good prior to the right, or is the right prior to the good?
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  34. George Bragues (2006). Seek the Good Life, Not Money: The Aristotelian Approach to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):341 - 357.score: 24.0
    Nothing is more common in moral debates than to invoke the names of great thinkers from the past. Business ethics is no exception. Yet insofar as business ethicists have tended to simply mine abstract formulas from the past, they have missed out on the potential intellectual gains in meticulously exploring the philosophic tradition. This paper seeks to rectify this shortcoming by advocating a close reading of the so-called “great books,” beginning the process by focusing on Aristotle. The Nichomachean Ethics and (...)
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  35. Domènec Melé (2009). Integrating Personalism Into Virtue-Based Business Ethics: The Personalist and the Common Good Principles. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):227 - 244.score: 24.0
    Some virtue ethicists are reluctant to consider principles and standards in business ethics. However, this is problematic. This paper argues that realistic Personalism can be integrated into virtue-based business ethics, giving it a more complete base. More specifically, two principles are proposed: the Personalist Principle (PP) and the Common Good Principle (CGP). The PP includes the Golden Rule and makes explicit the duty of respect, benevolence, and care for people, emphasizing human dignity and the innate rights of every human (...)
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  36. Diana Abad (2012). Groundhog Day and the Good Life. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):149-164.score: 24.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 One of the most important questions of moral philosophy is what makes a life a good life. A good way of approaching this issue is to watch the film Groundhog Day which can teach us a lot about what a good life consists in - and what not. While currently there are subjective and objective theories contending against each other about what a good life is, namely hedonism and desire (...)
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  37. Yuichiro Amekawa (2009). Reflections on the Growing Influence of Good Agricultural Practices in the Global South. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):531-557.score: 24.0
    EurepGAP is a pioneering field level food safety protocol called ‘good agricultural practices’ currently exercising influence over the global food quality assurance system. Developed by a consortium of major European retailers, this private standard enforces codes of conduct that address issues of health and safety for producers and consumers, as well as working conditions and environmental management on the farmland. Despite various merits and benefits that the standard is premised to offer, the institutional design gives a financial edge to (...)
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  38. Sergio Tenenbaum (2007). Appearances of the Good: An Essay on the Nature of Practical Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    'We desire all and only those things we conceive to be good; we avoid what we conceive to be bad.' This slogan was once the standard view of the relationship between desire or motivation and rational evaluation. Many critics have rejected this scholastic formula as either trivial or wrong. It appears to be trivial if we just define the good as 'what we want', and wrong if we consider apparent conflicts between what we seem to want and what (...)
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  39. Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus (2012). The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.score: 24.0
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
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  40. Steven J. Jensen (2010). Good and Evil Actions: A Journey Through Saint Thomas Aquinas. Catholic University of America Press.score: 24.0
    *Tackles the Thomistic debate surrounding the inherent good and evil of human actions*.
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  41. M. S. Kempshall (1999). The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book offers a major reinterpretation of the `secularization' of medieval ideas by examining scholastic discussions on the nature of the common good. It challenges the view that the rediscovery of Aristotle was the primary catalyst for the emergence of a secular theory of the state. A detailed exposition of the content and the context of late scholastic political and ethical thought reveals that the roots of medieval 'secularization' were profoundly theological.
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  42. Rosemary Desjardins (2004). Plato and the Good: Illuminating the Darkling Vision. Brill.score: 24.0
    This book is an original interpretation of Plato's enigmatic statements about the idea of the Good.
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  43. Mary M. Keys (2006). Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good claims that contemporary theory and practice have much to gain from engaging Aquinas's normative concept of the common good and his way of reconciling religion, philosophy, and politics. Examining the relationship between personal and common goods, and the relation of virtue and law to both, Mary M. Keys shows why Aquinas should be read in addition to Aristotle on these perennial questions. She focuses on Aquinas's Commentaries as mediating statements (...)
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  44. Julian Fink (2007). Is the Right Prior to the Good? South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):143-149.score: 24.0
    One popular line of argument put forward in support of the principle that the right is prior to the good is to show that teleological theories, which put the good prior to the right, lead to implausible normative results. There are situa- tions, it is argued, in which putting the good prior to the right entails that we ought to do things that cannot be right for us to do. Consequently, goodness cannot (always) explain an action's rightness. (...)
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  45. Patrick Hutchings (2009). What is the Good/ Good of the Form of the Good? Sophia 48 (4):413-417.score: 24.0
    Good’ is nothing specific but is transcendentally or generally applied over specific, and specified, ‘categories’. These ‘categories’ may be seen—at least for the purposes of this note—as under Platonic Forms. The rule that instances under a category or form need a Form to be under is valid. It may be tautological: but this is OK for rules. Not being specific, however, ‘good’ neither needs nor can have a specifying Form. So, on these grounds, the Form of the (...) is otious. Any rule of the kind, ‘Everything needs a Form, so good needs a Form of the Good’ is mistaken, in that good is not a kind, but a transcendental. To give a Form to the transcendental ‘good’ is a mistake: it is a Rylian category mistake. And the Form of the Good either does no work, or works unprofitably in any but an aesthetic sense. (shrink)
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  46. Marek Piechowiak (2011). W sprawie aksjologicznej spójności Konstytucji RP. Dobro wspólne czy godność człowieka? [Axiological Consistency of the Polish Constitution: Common Good or Human Dignity?]. In Stanisław Leszek Stadniczeńko (ed.), Jednolitość aksjologiczna systemu prawa w rozwijających się państwach demokratycznych Europy. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Opolskiego. 111-124.score: 24.0
    The author poses a question: which of the two fundamental, constitutional values – common good or human dignity – can be considered to be the cornerstone, the unifying value in the Constitution of the Republic of Poland from 1997. The paper shows the crucial reasons for accepting each of these values as primary and also presents the underlying relationships between these values . The prominence of a given value for defining the aim of the constitution and the legal order (...)
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  47. Klas Roth (2011). Good Will: Cosmopolitan Education as a Site for Deliberation. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (3):298-312.score: 24.0
    Why should we deliberate? I discuss a Kantian response to this query and argue that we cannot as rational beings avoid deliberation in principle; and that we have good reasons to consider the value and strength of Kant's philosophical investigations concerning fundamental moral issues and their relevance for the question of why we ought to deliberate. I also argue that deliberation is a wide duty. This means that it has to be set as an end, that it is meritorious, (...)
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  48. S. Prakash Sethi (2003). Globalization and the Good Corporation: A Need for Proactive Co-Existence. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):21 - 31.score: 24.0
    Large corporations are coming under intense pressure to act in a socially responsible manner. Corporations have accepted this notion provided that it is exercised voluntarily. It has also been argued that corporations can do well by doing good, and that good ethics is good business. This paper presents an alternative viewpoint by demonstrating that while voluntary socially responsible conduct is desirable, it plays a rather small role in inspiring good corporate conduct. Instead, (a) it is the (...)
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  49. Mahrad Almotahari & Adam Hosein (forthcoming). Is Anything Just Plain Good? Philosophical Studies:1-24.score: 24.0
    Geach (Analysis 17: 33–42, 1956) and Thomson (J Philos 94:273–298, 1997, Normativity, 2008) have argued that nothing is just plain good, because ‘good’ is, logically, an attributive adjective. The upshot, according to Geach and Thomson, is that consequentialism is unacceptable, since its very formulation requires a predicative (non-attributive) use of ‘good’. Reactions to the argument have, for the most part, been uniform. Authors have converged on two challenging objections (Ross, The right and the good, 1930; Pidgen, (...)
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