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  1. Peter L. Samuelson, Matthew J. Jarvinen, Thomas B. Paulus, Ian M. Church, Sam A. Hardy & Justin L. Barrett (forthcoming). Implicit Theories of Intellectual Virtues and Vices: A Focus on Intellectual Humility. Journal of Positive Psychology.
    The study of intellectual humility is still in its early stages and issues of definition and measurement are only now being explored. To inform and guide the process of defining and measuring this important intellectual virtue, we conducted a series of studies into the implicit theory – or ‘folk’ understanding – of an intellectually humble person, a wise person, and an intellectually arrogant person. In Study 1, 350 adults used a free-listing procedure to generate a list of descriptors, one for (...)
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  2. Justin L. Barrett & Ian M. Church (2013). Should CSR Give Atheists Epistemic Assurance? On Beer-Goggles, BFFs, and Skepticism Regarding Religious Beliefs. The Monist 96 (3):311-324.
    Recent work in cognitive science of religion (CSR) is beginning to converge on a very interesting thesis—that, given the ordinary features of human minds operating in typical human environments, we are naturally disposed to believe in the existence of gods, among other religious ideas (e.g., seeAtran [2002], Barrett [2004; 2012], Bering [2011], Boyer [2001], Guthrie [1993], McCauley [2011], Pyysiäinen [2004; 2009]). In this paper, we explore whether such a discovery ultimately helps or hurts the atheist position—whether, for example, it lends (...)
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  3. Justin L. Barrett (2012). The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  4. Justin L. Barrett (2011). From Theory of Mind to Divine Minds. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (6):244-245.
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  5. Emma Cohen & Justin L. Barrett (2011). In Search of 'Folk Anthropology': The Cognitive Anthropology of the Person. In J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen & Erik P. Wiebe (eds.), In Search of Self: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Personhood. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.. 104--122.
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  6. Justin L. Barrett (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):174-189.
    Reformed epistemology and cognitive science have remarkably converged on belief in God. Reformed epistemology holds that belief in God is basic—that is, belief in God is a natural, non-inferential belief that is immediately produced by a cognitive faculty. Cognitive science of religion also holds that belief in gods is (often) non-reflectively and instinctively produced—that is, non-inferentially and automatically produced by a cognitive faculty or system. But there are differences. In this paper, we will show some remarkable points of convergence, and (...)
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  7. Emma Cohen & Justin L. Barrett (2008). Conceptualizing Spirit Possession: Ethnographic and Experimental Evidence. Ethos 36 (2):246-267.
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  8. Justin L. Barrett (2004). Counterfactuality in Counterintuitive Religious Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):731-732.
    In sketching a preliminary scientific theory of religion, Atran & Norenzayan (A&N) generally agree with cognitive scientists of religion in the factors that coalesce to form religion. At times they misrepresent, however, the notion of “counterintuitive” concepts as they apply to religious concepts, confusing counterintuitive with counterfactual, category mistakes, and logical contradiction.
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  9. Nicola Knight, Paulo Sousa, Justin L. Barrett & Scott Atran (2004). Children's Attributions of Beliefs to Humans and God: Cross‐Cultural Evidence. Cognitive Science 28 (1):117-126.
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  10. Justin L. Barrett (2000). Exploring the Natural Foundations of Religion. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):29-34.
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