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Profile: Justine Kingsbury (University of Waikato)
  1. Tracy Bowell & Justine Kingsbury (2013). Virtue and Argument: Taking Character Into Account. Informal Logic 33 (1):22-32.
    In this paper we consider the prospects for an account of good argument that takes the character of the arguer into consideration. We conclude that although there is much to be gained by identifying the virtues of the good arguer and by considering the ways in which these virtues can be developed in ourselves and in others, virtue argumentation theory does not offer a plausible alternative definition of good argument.
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  2. Justine Kingsbury (2013). The Artful Species, by Stephen Davies. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):804-807.
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  3. Justine Kingsbury (2013). The Artful Species, by Stephen Davies: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. 301,£ 25 (Hardback). Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  4. Dan Ryder, Justine Kingsbury & Kenneth Williford (eds.) (2013). Millikan and Her Critics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Millikan and Her Critics offers a unique critical discussion of Ruth Millikan's highly regarded, influential, and systematic contributions to philosophy of mind and language, philosophy of biology, epistemology, and metaphysics. These newly written contributions present discussion from some of the most important philosophers in the field today and include replies from Millikan herself.
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  5. Justine Kingsbury (2011). (R)Evolutionary Aesthetics: Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):141-150.
    Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct succeeds admirably in showing that it is possible to think about art from a biological point of view, and this is a significant achievement, given that resistance to the idea that cultural phenomena have biological underpinnings remains widespread in many academic disciplines. However, his account of the origins of our artistic impulses and the far-reaching conclusions he draws from that account are not persuasive. This article points out a number of problems: in particular, problems with (...)
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  6. Justine Kingsbury & Jonathan McKeown-Green (2009). Definitions. Journal of Philosophy 106 (10):568-585.
    Many who doubt its analytic status nonetheless agree with the claim that a spinster is a woman of marriageable age who has not yet married. They are also likely to agree that this claim has the look of a definition. After all, it has the following four features: 1) Extensional adequacy: It cites a particular condition that is met by all and only things of the kind being defined (the spinsters, in this case).
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  7. Jonathan McKeown-Green & Justine Kingsbury (2009). Jackson's Armchair : The Only Chair in Town? In David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.), Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism. Mit Press.
     
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  8. Tim Dare & Justine Kingsbury (2008). Putting the Burden of Proof in Its Place: When Are Differential Allocations Legitimate? Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):503-518.
    To have the burden of proof is to be rationally required to argue for or provide evidence for your position. To have a heavier burden than an opponent is to be rationally required to provide better evidence or better arguments than they are required to provide. Many commentators suggest that differential or uneven distribution of the burden of proof is ubiquitous. In reasoned discourse, the idea goes, it is almost always the case that one party must prove the claim at (...)
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  9. Justine Kingsbury (2008). Learning and Selection. Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):493-507.
    Are learning processes selection processes? This paper takes a slightly modified version of the account of selection presented in Hull et al. (Behav Brain Sci 24:511–527, 2001) and asks whether it applies to learning processes. The answer is that although some learning processes are selectional, many are not. This has consequences for teleological theories of mental content. According to these theories, mental states have content in virtue of having proper functions, and they have proper functions in virtue of being the (...)
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  10. Justine Kingsbury (2007). Arts and Minds. – Gregory Currie. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):508–510.
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  11. Justine Kingsbury (2006). A Proper Understanding of Millikan. Acta Analytica 21 (40):23-40.
    Ruth Millikan’s teleological theory of mental content is complex and often misunderstood. This paper motivates and clarifies some of the complexities of the theory, and shows that paying careful attention to its details yields answers to a number of common objections to teleological theories, in particular, the problem of novel mental states, the problem of functionally false beliefs, and problems about indeterminacy or multiplicity of function.
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  12. Justine Kingsbury (2004). Biologising the Mind. Biology and Philosophy 19 (3):473-482.
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  13. Justine Kingsbury (2003). A Philosophy of Mass Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):134 – 135.
    Book Information A Philosophy of Mass Art. A Philosophy of Mass Art Noël Carroll Oxford Clarendon Press 1998 x + 425 Paperback Aus.$45.00 By Noël Carroll. Clarendon Press. Oxford. Pp. x + 425. Paperback:Aus.$45.00.
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  14. Justine Kingsbury (2002). Matravers on Musical Expressiveness. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1):13-19.
    , Derek Matravers defends a new version of the arousal theory of musical expressiveness. In this paper it is argued that for various reasons, including especially what the theory implies about the inappropriateness of certain kinds of response to music, we should reject Matravers's theory in favour of some form of cognitivism.
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  15. Justine Kingsbury (2001). Teaching Argument Construction. Informal Logic 22 (1).
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  16. Justine Kingsbury (1999). Why the Arousal Theory of Musical Expressiveness is Still Wrong. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):83 – 88.
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