Search results for 'K. A. Mohyeldin Said' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. K. A. Mohyeldin Said (ed.) (1990). Modelling the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 2490.0
    This collection by a distinguished group of philosophers, psychologists, and physiologists reflects an interdisciplinary approach to the central question of cognitive science: how do we model the mind? Among the topics explored are the relationships (theoretical, reductive, and explanatory) between philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology; what should be asked of models in science generally, and in cognitive science in particular; whether theoretical models must make essential reference to objects in the environment; whether there are human competences that are resistant, (...)
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  2. Brendan Peter Triffett (2012). Processio and The Place of Ontic Being: John Milbank and James K.A. Smith On Participation. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):n/a-n/a.score: 288.0
    James K.A. Smith argues that the ontology of participation associated with Radical Orthodoxy is incompatible with a Christian affirmation of the intrinsic being and goodness of creatures. In response, he proposes a Leibnizian view in which things are endowed with the innate dynamism of ‘force’. Creatures have a certain depth of being, and are intrinsically good, just because they each have an inner virtuality that they bring into expression. Such force is said to be a metaphysical component of the (...)
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  3. Stephen Kaplan (2004). Revisiting K. C. Bhattacharyya's Concept of the Absolute and its Alternative Forms: A Holographic Model for Simultaneous Illumination. Asian Philosophy 14 (2):99 – 115.score: 216.0
    Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya, one of the preeminent Indian philosophers of the 20th century, proposed that the absolute appears in three alternative forms - truth, freedom and value. Each of these forms are for Bhattacharyya absolute, ultimate, not penultimate. Each is different from the other, yet they cannot be said to be one or many. He contends that these absolutes are incompatible with each other and that an articulation of the relation between the three absolutes is not feasible. This (...)
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  4. K. A. Mohyeldin Said, W. H. Newton-Smith, R. Viale & K. V. Wilkes (eds.) (1990). Modelling the Mind. Clarendon Press.score: 198.0
    SEE AUTHOR'S BLURB FOR LEAFLETS This collection of papers by distinguished philosophers, psychologists, and physiologists reflects an interdisciplinary approach to the central question of cognitive science: how do we model the mind? Among the questions explored are the relationships (theoretical, reductive, and explanatory) between philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology; what should be asked of models in science generally, and in cognitive science in particular; whether theoretical models must make essential reference to objects in the environment; whether there are human (...)
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  5. Cf E. Franco & K. Preisendanz (2006). To the Profound Regret of Indologists, Philosophers and Scholars of Religion and Cross-Cultural Studies, Our Esteemed Colleague Wilhelm Halbfass Passed Away on May 25, 2000, After Suf-Fering a Severe Stroke. He Passed Away Peacefully the Next Day. Halbfass' Premature Death, Shortly After His Sixtieth Birthday, has Bereaved Indologists and Philosophers of a Major and Unique Voice, and of an Irreplaceable Authoritative Presence. In an Obituary John Taber Said. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 2000:426.score: 189.0
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  6. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 126.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly comments (...)
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  7. Raymundo Hernández & Octavio Novaro (2014). The First Metals in Mendeleiev's Table: Part II. A New Argument Against the Placement of Hydrogen Atop the Alkali Metal Column. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 16 (3):177-180.score: 126.0
    Every so often an experiment trying to give reliable evidence for a metallic hydrogen solid is reported. Such evidence is, however, not too convincing. As Eric Scerri has recently reiterated, “the jury is still out on that issue” (Scerri 2012). This search stems from the common spectroscopy shared by the hydrogen atom and all the alkali metal atoms, and perhaps is guided by a desire to place hydrogen atop the alkali metals, in Mendeleiev’s Table, reinforced by the fact pointed out (...)
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  8. Jeroen Mettes (2012). Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30. Continent 2 (1):29-35.score: 126.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
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  9. Andy Mousley (ed.) (2011). Towards a New Literary Humanism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 126.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Towards a New Literary Humanism; A. Mousley -- PART I: LITERATURE_AS ERSATZ_THEOLOGY: DEEP SELVES -- Introduction; A. Mousley -- Faith, Feeling, Reality: Anne Brontë as an Existentialist Poet; R. Styler -- Virginia Woolf, Sympathy and Feeling for the Human; K. Martin -- Being Human and being Animal in Twentieth-Century Horse-Whispering Writings: 'Word-Bound Creatures' and 'the Breath of Horses'; E. Graham_ -- Judith Butler and the Catachretic Human; I. Arteel (...)
     
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  10. J. Datta, A. Kessel, K. Wellings, K. Nanchahal, D. Marks & G. Kinghorn (2011). The Views of Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) Clinic Users on Unlinked Anonymous Testing for HIV: Evidence From a Pilot Study of Clinics in Two English Cities. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):668-672.score: 117.0
    A study was undertaken of the views of users of two genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England on unlinked anonymous testing (UAT) for HIV. The UAT programme measures the prevalence of HIV in the population, including undiagnosed prevalence, by testing residual blood (from samples taken for clinical purposes) which is anonymised and irreversibly unlinked from the source. 424 clinic users completed an anonymous questionnaire about their knowledge of, and attitudes towards, UAT. Only 1/7 (14%) were aware that blood left over (...)
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  11. A. K. Huggins (2014). They Are Starting to Crawl Out of the Woodwork: A Commentary on the Aspirations of Young Gay People Without Religious Dogma. Australian Humanist, The 114:20.score: 117.0
    Huggins, AK When the debate about gay marriage really started to gain some momentum in Australia, probably a year or two before the last Labor Party Conference, I predicted amongst some of my gay friends that, as we got closer to a vote or other defining moments in this process, people and organisations would start 'crawling out of the woodwork' with distasteful, even despicable ways to demonise same-sex partnership and indeed gay people generally. I was right. I also mentioned to (...)
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  12. [deleted]Wery P. M. Van Den Wildenberg, Scott A. Wylie, Birte U. Forstmann, Borís Burle, Thierry Hasbroucq & K. Richard Ridderinkhof (2010). To Head or to Heed? Beyond the Surface of Selective Action Inhibition: A Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4 (222).score: 117.0
    To head rather than heed to temptations is easier said than done. Since tempting actions are often contextually inappropriate, selective suppression is invoked to inhibit such actions. Thus far, laboratory tasks have not been very successful in highlighting these processes. We suggest that this is for three reasons. First, it is important to dissociate between an early susceptibility to making stimulus-driven impulsive but erroneous actions, and the subsequent selective suppression of these impulses that facilitates the selection of the correct (...)
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  13. K. Helmut Reich (2012). How Could We Get to a More Peaceful and Sustainable Human World Society? The Role of Science and Religion. Zygon 47 (2):308-321.score: 90.0
    Abstract This call to think, to feel, to read about the title subject and to act first lists five hurdles on the way to a more peaceful and sustainable human society. A number of successful solutions are then presented, such as the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea. There follow sections on potential contributions by religion and by collaboration between science and religion. My plea is for a widespread participation at all levels of society and an attitude of (...)
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  14. M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). "If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.score: 90.0
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including three women), (...)
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  15. D. G. Kirchhoffer & K. Dierickx (2011). Human Dignity and Human Tissue: A Meaningful Ethical Relationship? Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):552-556.score: 90.0
    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings (...)
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  16. Marc W. Howard, Karthik H. Shankar & Udaya K. K. Jagadisan (2011). Constructing Semantic Representations From a Gradually Changing Representation of Temporal Context. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):48-73.score: 90.0
    Computational models of semantic memory exploit information about co-occurrences of words in naturally occurring text to extract information about the meaning of the words that are present in the language. Such models implicitly specify a representation of temporal context. Depending on the model, words are said to have occurred in the same context if they are presented within a moving window, within the same sentence, or within the same document. The temporal context model (TCM), which specifies a particular definition (...)
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  17. K. Vaux (1999). Law and Lamb: AKEDAH and the Search for a Deep Religious Symbol for an Ecumenical Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):213-219.score: 90.0
    This essay looks at the concept of AKEDAH, the essence of which is the travail of the human condition and the trust in vindication and victory, as a salient and deep metaphor for bioethics. The author first delineates the symbol, then shows its theological and ethical significance, and finally suggests its bioethical applications. The LORD said, “Go get Isaac, your only son, the one you dearly love! Take him to the land of Moriah, and I will show you a (...)
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  18. V. Gopichandran & S. K. Chetlapalli (2012). Conditional Cash Transfer to Promote Institutional Deliveries in India: Toward a Sustainable Ethical Model to Achieve MDG 5A. Public Health Ethics 5 (2):173-180.score: 90.0
    The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 A states that the maternal mortality ratio has to be reduced to three-quarters between 1990 and 2015. The target for India is a maternal mortality ratio of 109/100,000 live births. The Janani Suraksha Yojna (JSY) (Maternal Protection Scheme) is a centrally sponsored conditional cash transfer scheme to promote institutional deliveries and thus ensure safe delivery and reduce maternal mortality. The JSY scheme and its various evaluations were reviewed. The Tannahill’s ethical framework was applied to (...)
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  19. K. Kuehlmeyer, G. D. Borasio & R. J. Jox (2012). How Family Caregivers' Medical and Moral Assumptions Influence Decision Making for Patients in the Vegetative State: A Qualitative Interview Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):332-337.score: 90.0
    Background Decisions on limiting life-sustaining treatment for patients in the vegetative state (VS) are emotionally and morally challenging. In Germany, doctors have to discuss, together with the legal surrogate (often a family member), whether the proposed treatment is in accordance with the patient's will. However, it is unknown whether family members of the patient in the VS actually base their decisions on the patient's wishes. Objective To examine the role of advance directives, orally expressed wishes, or the presumed will of (...)
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  20. K. Kath Dhanda & Laura P. Hartman (2011). The Ethics of Carbon Neutrality: A Critical Examination of Voluntary Carbon Offset Providers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):119 - 149.score: 90.0
    In this article, we explore the world's response to the increasing impact of carbon emissions on the sobering threat posed by global warming: the carbon offset market. Though the market is a relatively new one, numerous offset providers have quickly emerged under both regulated and voluntary regimes. Owing to the lack of technical literacy of some stakeholders who participate in the market, no common quality or certification structure has yet emerged for providers. To the contrary, the media warns that a (...)
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  21. J. K. Miles (2012). A Perfectionist Defense of Free Speech. Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):213-230.score: 90.0
    It is often said that if free speech means anything it means freedom for the thought we hate. This core idea is generally referred to as “viewpoint neutrality” and is consistent with the liberal intuition that governments should remain neutral with regard to conceptions of the good life. None of the traditional defenses of free speech seem to secure viewpoint neutrality, however. Instead, each justification leaves room to censor some viewpoints. Ironically my defense of viewpoint neutrality does not come (...)
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  22. Branden Fitelson & James Hawthorne (2010). How Bayesian Confirmation Theory Handles the Paradox of the Ravens. In Ellery Eells & James Fetzer (eds.), The Place of Probability in Science. Springer. 247--275.score: 85.5
    The Paradox of the Ravens (a.k.a,, The Paradox of Confirmation) is indeed an old chestnut. A great many things have been written and said about this paradox and its implications for the logic of evidential support. The first part of this paper will provide a brief survey of the early history of the paradox. This will include the original formulation of the paradox and the early responses of Hempel, Goodman, and Quine. The second part of the paper will describe (...)
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  23. Noa Latham (2003). Are There Any Nonmotivating Reasons for Action? In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic. 273.score: 81.0
    When performing an action of a certain kind, an agent typically has se- veral reasons for doing so. I shall borrow Davidson’s term and call these rationalising reasons (Davidson 1963, 3). These are reasons that allow us to understand what the agent regarded as favourable features of such an action. (There will also be reasons against acting, expressing unfavour- able features of such an action, from the agent’s point of view.) I shall say that R is a rationalising reason of (...)
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  24. Mark C. Vopat (2010). Mandatory School Uniforms and Freedom of Expression. Ethics and Education 5 (3):203 - 215.score: 81.0
    On 10 December 2007 the Akron City School Board ? following the precedent set by many school systems across the United States and the world ? instituted a policy of mandatory school uniforms for all students in grades K?8. The measure was met with mixed reviews. While many parents supported the measure, a small group of parents from a selective, arts-focussed, middle school (grades 4?8) objected to the policy. It was their contention that children attending this particular school should be (...)
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  25. Rosanna Keefe (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Vagueness: Supervaluationism. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):213-215.score: 81.0
    Vagueness is an extremely widespread feature of language, famously associated with the sorites paradox. One instance of this paradox concludes that a single grain of sand is a heap of sand, by starting with a large heap of sand and invoking the plausible premise that if you take one grain of sand away from a heap of sand, then you still have a heap. The supervaluationist theory of vagueness states that a sentence is true if and only if it is (...)
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  26. John Humphrey, Some Oddities in Kripke's Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language.score: 81.0
    Oddity One : Kripke claims that Wittgenstein has invented "a new form of scepticism", one which inclines Kripke "to regard it as the most radical and original sceptical problem that philosophy has seen to date, one that only a highly unusual cast of mind could have produced" (K, p. 60). However, Kripke also claims that there are analogies (and sometimes the analogies look very much like identities) between Wittgenstein's sceptical argument and the work of at least three and maybe four (...)
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  27. Colin Klein, Phantom Limbs and the Imperative Account of Pain.score: 81.0
    Amputation of a limb can result in the persistent hallucination that the limb is still present [Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1998]. Distressingly, these socalled ‘phantom limbs’ are often quite painful. Of a friend whose arm had been amputated due to gas gangrene, W.K. Livingston writes: I once asked him why the sense of tenseness in the hand was so frequently emphasized among his complaints. He asked me to clench my fingers over my thumb, flex my wrist, and raise the arm into (...)
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  28. Robert E. Butts (1966). Feyerabend and the Pragmatic Theory of Observation. Philosophy of Science 33 (4):383-394.score: 81.0
    Central to Paul K. Feyerabend's philosophy of science are two theses: (1) there is no standard observation language available to science; instead, observability is to be viewed as a pragmatic matter; and (2) when considering questions of empirical significance and experimental test, the methodological unit of science is a set of inconsistent theories. I argue that the pragmatic theory of observation by itself decides neither for nor against any particular specification of meaning for an observation language; and that Feyerabend's position (...)
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  29. Jane Maienschein (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part II - What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12 – 19.score: 81.0
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem cells," and "embryos," (...)
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  30. Brian Ellis & Peter Bowman (1967). Conventionality in Distant Simulataneity. Philosophy of Science 34 (2):116-136.score: 81.0
    In his original paper of 1905, "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies", Einstein described a procedure for synchronizing distant clocks at rest in any inertial system K. Clocks thus synchronized may be said to be in standard signal synchrony in K. It has often been claimed that there are no logical or physical reasons for preferring standard signal synchronizations to any of a range of possible non-standard ones. In this paper, the range of consistent non-standard signal synchronizations, first for (...)
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  31. Christopher Barney (2003). Ultrafilters on the Natural Numbers. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (3):764-784.score: 81.0
    We study the problem of existence and generic existence of ultrafilters on ω. We prove a conjecture of $J\ddot{o}rg$ Brendle's showing that there is an ultrafilter that is countably closed but is not an ordinal ultrafilter under CH. We also show that Canjar's previous partial characterization of the generic existence of Q-points is the best that can be done. More simply put, there is no normal cardinal invariant equality that fully characterizes the generic existence of Q-points. We then sharpen results (...)
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  32. Stephen Jay Gould, Genesis Vs. Geology.score: 81.0
    G.K.CHESTERTON once mused over Noah's dinnertime conversations during those long nights on a And Noah he often said to his wife when he sat down to dine, "I don't care where the water goes if it doesn't get into the wine." Noah's insouciance has not been matched by defenders of his famous flood. For centuries, fundamentalists have tried very hard to find a place for the subsiding torrents. They have struggled even more valiantly to devise a source for all (...)
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  33. Feliz Molina (2013). Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz. Continent 3 (1):17-24.score: 81.0
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  34. Robin Hirsch & Ian Hodkinson (2009). Strongly Representable Atom Structures of Cylindric Algebras. Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (3):811-828.score: 81.0
    A cylindric algebra atom structure is said to be strongly representable if all atomic cylindric algebras with that atom structure are representable. This is equivalent to saying that the full complex algebra of the atom structure is a representable cylindric algebra. We show that for any finite n >3, the class of all strongly representable n-dimensional cylindric algebra atom structures is not closed under ultraproducts and is therefore not elementary. Our proof is based on the following construction. From an (...)
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  35. Michel Rigo (2004). Characterizing Simpler Recognizable Sets of Integers. Studia Logica 76 (3):407 - 426.score: 81.0
    For a given numeration system U, a set X of integers is said to be U-star-free if the language of the normalized U-representations of the elements in X is star-free. Adapting a result of McNaughton and Papert, we give a first-order logical characterization of these sets for various numeration systems including integer base systems and the Fibonacci system. For k-ary systems, the problem of the base dependence of this property is also studied. Finally, the case of k-adic systems is (...)
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  36. J. F. A. K. van Benthem & I. L. Humberstone (1983). Halldén-Completeness by Gluing of Kripke Frames. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 24 (4):426-430.score: 72.0
    We give in this paper a sufficient condition, cast in semantic terms, for Hallden-completeness in normal modal logics, a modal logic being said to be Hallden-complete (or Ήallden-reasonable') just in case for any disjunctive formula provable in the logic, where the disjuncts have no propositional variables in common, one or other of those disjuncts is provable in the logic.
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  37. Panayot K. Butchvarov (1998). Skepticism About the External World. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 45.0
    One of the most important and perennially debated philosophical questions is whether we can have knowledge of the external world. Butchvarov here considers whether and how skepticism with regard to such knowledge can be refuted or at least answered. He argues that only a direct realist view of perception has any hope of providing a compelling response to the skeptic and introduces the radical innovation that the direct object of perceptual, and even dreaming and hallucinatory, experience is always a material (...)
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  38. Howard K. Wettstein (1981). Demonstrative Reference and Definite Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):241--57.score: 45.0
    A distinction is developed between two uses of definite descriptions, the "attributive" and the "referential." the distinction exists even in the same sentence. several criteria are given for making the distinction. it is suggested that both russell's and strawson's theories fail to deal with this distinction, although some of the things russell says about genuine proper names can be said about the referential use of definite descriptions. it is argued that the presupposition or implication that something fits the description, (...)
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  39. Fred A. Keijzer & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2007). Embedded Cognition and Mental Causation: Setting Empirical Bounds on Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Synthese 158 (1):109 - 125.score: 45.0
    We argue that embedded cognition provides an argument against Jaegwon Kim’s neural reduction of mental causation. Because some mental, or at least psychological processes have to be cast in an externalist way, Kim’s argument can be said to lead to the conclusion that mental causation is as safe as any other form of higher-level of causation.
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  40. William K. Frankena (2000). The Methods of Ethics, Edition 7, Page 92, Note. Utilitas 12 (03):278-.score: 45.0
    This essay, one of the last that Frankena wrote, provides a scrupulously detailed exploration of the various possible meanings of one of Sidgwick's most famous footnotes in the Methods Long intrigued by what Sidgwick had in mind when he said that he would explain how it came about that for moderns it is not tautologous to claim that one's own good is one's only reasonable ultimate end, Frankena uses this note as a point of departure for a penetrating review (...)
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  41. Geoffrey K. Pullum & Gerald Gazdar (1982). Natural Languages and Context-Free Languages. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (4):471 - 504.score: 45.0
    Notice that this paper has not claimed that all natural languages are CFL's. What it has shown is that every published argument purporting to demonstrate the non-context-freeness of some natural language is invalid, either formally or empirically or both.18 Whether non-context-free characteristics can be found in the stringset of some natural language remains an open question, just as it was a quarter century ago.Whether the question is ultimately answered in the negative or the affirmative, there will be interesting further questions (...)
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  42. David K. Henderson (1991). On the Testability of Psychological Generalizations (Psychological Testability). Philosophy of Science (December) 586 (December):586-606.score: 45.0
    Rosenberg argues that intentional generalizations in the human sciences cannot be law-like because they are not amenable to significant empirical refinement. This irrefinability is said to result from the principle that supposedly controls in intentional explanation also serving as the standard for successful interpretation. The only credible evidence bearing on such a principle would then need conform to it. I argue that psychological generalizations are refinable and can be nomic. I show how empirical refinement of psychological generalizations is possible (...)
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  43. Sarah K. Paul (2014). The Transparency of Mind. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):295-303.score: 45.0
    In philosophical inquiry into the mind, the metaphor of ‘transparency’ has been attractive to many who are otherwise in deep disagreement. It has thereby come to have a variety of different and mutually incompatible connotations. The mind is said to be transparent to itself, our perceptual experiences are said to be transparent to the world, and our beliefs are said to be transparent to – a great many different things. The first goal of this essay is to (...)
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  44. Jamess H. Korn, Timothy J. Huelsman, Cynthia K. Shinabarger Reed & Michelle Aiello (1992). Perceived Ethicality of Guided Imagery in Rape Research. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):1 – 14.score: 45.0
    In our first study, undergraduate students (30 men, 30 women) evaluated the ethical acceptability of two previously published studies that used guided imagery in rape situations. In one, women imagined themselves as rape victims; in the other, men imagined themselves as rapist. Most students rated the research acceptable, but there was a significant interaction (g < .05): Women found the study of women as victim less ethical, and men found the study of men as rapist less ethical. In our second (...)
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  45. K. Cyriac & R. Dharmaraj (1994). Machiavellianism in Indian Management. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (4):281 - 286.score: 45.0
    Machiavellianism has tremendous influence on modern business communities, especially in the U.S.A. and European countries. Businessmen today, it is said, prefer to follow the directions of pragmatism and expediency rather than the dictates of individual conscience.In principles and practices, Indian management by and large follows the Western line. Therefore, the question arises whether Machiavellian influences are perceptibly high on Indian managers. This question is more relevant in the light of a few surveys conducted on the ethical attitudes of Indian (...)
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  46. K. R. Mitchell, I. H. Kerridge & T. J. Lovat (1993). Medical Futility, Treatment Withdrawal and the Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):71-76.score: 45.0
    Why do we persist in the relentless pursuit of artificial nourishment and other treatments to maintain a permanently unconscious existence? In facing the future, if not the present world-wide reality of a huge number of persistent vegetative state (PVS) patients, will they be treated because of our ethical commitment to their humanity, or because of an ethical paralysis in the face of biotechnical progress? The PVS patient is cut off from the normal patterns of human connection and communication, with a (...)
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  47. Anthony K. Jensen (2013). Meta-Historical Transitions From Philology to Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):196-212.score: 45.0
    The possibility of historical knowledge is a problem that occupied Nietzsche’s thought from beginning to end. Because the meanings of values, customs, and even truth itself are historically contingent phenomena, neither timeless nor unchanging, Nietzsche’s most fundamental statements about the character of the world and our place in it are typically framed within a historical account. Several scholars have recently suggested that his means of expositing history are consistent throughout his career. 1 From his early philological articles to his genealogical (...)
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  48. Peter K. Machamer, James E. McGuire & Justin Sytsma (2005). Knowing Causes: Descartes on the World of Matter. Philosophica 76.score: 45.0
    In this essay, we discuss how Descartes arrives at his mature view of material causation. Descartes’ position changes over time in some very radical ways. The last section spells out his final position as to how causation works in the world of material objects. When considering Descartes’ causal theories, it is useful to distinguish between ‘vertical’ and ‘horizontal’ causation. The vertical perspective addresses God’s relation to creation. God is essential being, and every being other than God depends upon God in (...)
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