50 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
K. M. Boyd [19]K. Boyd [15]Kenneth Boyd [10]Kenneth M. Boyd [5]
Katherine A. Boyd [1]
See also:
Profile: Karen Boyd
Profile: Kyle Boyd (University of Ottawa)
Profile: Ken Boyd (Dalhousie University)
  1. Kenneth Boyd (forthcoming). Assertion, Practical Reasoning, and Epistemic Separabilism. Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    I argue here for a view I call epistemic separabilism (ES), which states that there are two different ways we can be evaluated epistemically when we assert a proposition or treat a proposition as a reason for acting: one in terms of whether we have adhered to or violated the relevant epistemic norm, and another in terms of how epistemically well-positioned we are towards the fact that we have either adhered to or violated said norm. ES has been appealed to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. K. Boyd (2014). Responding to Complexity. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):143-144.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kenneth Boyd & Jennifer Nagel (2014). The Reliability of Epistemic Intuitions. In Edouard Machery & O'Neill Elizabeth (eds.), Current Controversies in Experimental Philosophy. Routledge. 109-127.
  4. Kenneth Boyd (2013). Sir Patrick Nairne. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):660-660.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kenneth Boyd (2013). The Making of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):661-661.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Edward Shotter, Margaret Lloyd, Roger Higgs & Kenneth Boyd (2013). Fifty Years of Medical Ethics: From the London Medical Group to the Institute of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):662-666.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. K. Boyd (2012). Editorial Note on 'Abortion and Regret'. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):712-712.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kenneth Boyd (2012). Levi's Challenge and Peirce's Theory/Practice Distinction. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (1):51-70.
    Isaac Levi (1980) targets an implicit tension in C.S. Peirce’s epistemology, one that exists between the need to always be open-minded and aware of our propensity to make mistakes so that we do not “block the road of inquiry,” and the need to treat certain beliefs as infallible and to doubt only in a genuine way so that inquiry can proceed in the first place. Attempts at alleviating this tension have typically involved interpreting Peirce as ascribing different normative standards to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. K. Boyd (2011). Highlights From This Issue. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):641-641.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. K. Boyd (2011). The Moral Life is Something That Goes on Continually. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):641-641.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kenneth Boyd (2010). Knowledge in an Uncertain World * by Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath. Analysis 71 (1):189-191.
    A review of Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath's "Knowledge in an Uncertain World.".
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Charles B. Strozier, David M. Terman, James W. Jones & Katherine A. Boyd (2010). The Fundamentalist Mindset: Psychological Perspectives on Religion, Violence, and History. OUP USA.
    This penetrating book sheds light on the psychology of fundamentalism, with a particular focus on those who become extremists and fanatics. What accounts for the violence that emerges among some fundamentalist groups? The contributors to this book identify several factors: a radical dualism, in which all aspects of life are bluntly categorized as either good or evil; a destructive inclination to interpret authoritative texts, laws, and teachings in the most literal of terms; an extreme and totalized conversion experience; paranoid thinking; (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. G. M. Stirrat, C. Johnston, R. Gillon & K. Boyd (2009). Medical Ethics and Law for Doctors of Tomorrow: The 1998 Consensus Statement Updated. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):55-60.
    Knowledge of the ethical and legal basis of medicine is as essential to clinical practice as an understanding of basic medical sciences. In the UK, the General Medical Council (GMC) requires that medical graduates behave according to ethical and legal principles and must know about and comply with the GMC’s ethical guidance and standards. We suggest that these standards can only be achieved when the teaching and learning of medical ethics, law and professionalism are fundamental to, and thoroughly integrated both (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. R. V. Carlson, N. H. van Ginneken, L. M. Pettigrew, A. Davies, K. M. Boyd & D. J. Webb (2007). The Three Official Language Versions of the Declaration of Helsinki: What's Lost in Translation? Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):545-548.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kenneth Boyd (2006). Giving New Functions to Old Forms: The Aesthetics of Reassigned Architecture. Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 3 (2):66-75.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. R. Parks, P. M. Warren, K. M. Boyd, H. Cameron, A. Cumming & G. Lloyd-Jones (2006). The Objective Structured Clinical Examination and Student Collusion: Marks Do Not Tell the Whole Truth. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):734-738.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.) (2006). Nursing Ethics. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.
    Ethics in nursing: continuity and change -- Cultural issues, methods and approaches to nursing ethics -- Nursing ethics: what do we mean by 'ethics'? -- Becoming a nurse and member of the profession -- Power and responsibility in nursing practice and management -- Professional responsibility and accountability in nursing -- Classical areas of controversy in nursing and biomedical ethics -- Direct responsibility in nurse/patient relationships -- Conflicting demands in nursing groups of patients -- Ethics in healthcare management: research, evaluation and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. K. M. Boyd (2005). Medical Ethics: Principles, Persons, and Perspectives: From Controversy to Conversation. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):481-486.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. K. M. Boyd (2002). Mrs Pretty and Ms B. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):211-212.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. K. M. Boyd (2001). Disability. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):361-362.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Kenneth Boyd (2001). Deciding About Resuscitation. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):291-294.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. K. M. Boyd (2000). An AIDS Lexicon. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (1):66-76.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. K. M. Boyd (2000). Disease, Illness, Sickness, Health, Healing and Wholeness: Exploring Some Elusive Concepts. Medical Humanities 26 (1):9-17.
    Concepts such as disease and health can be difficult to define precisely. Part of the reason for this is that they embody value judgments and are rooted in metaphor. The precise meaning of terms like health, healing and wholeness is likely to remain elusive, because the disconcerting openness of the outlook gained from experience alone resists the reduction of first-person judgments (including those of religion) to third-person explanations (including those of science).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. K. Boyd (1999). To Relieve the Human Condition. Bioethics, Technology and the Body. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):357-358.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kenneth Boyd (1999). Bringing Both Sides Together. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (01):43-45.
    It began in 1992, with two men walking out of a television studio. Colin Blakemore, Oxford Professor of Physiology, is a quiet-spoken, eloquent defender of the use of animals in medical research. Les Ward, Director of the Edinburgh-based Advocates for Animals, is a passionate opponent of animal use. Bringing them together in front of an invited audience with strong opinions on both sides would make the sparks fly and be good viewing. But Blakemore and Ward, retiring after yet another bout (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. R. Ashcroft, D. Baron, S. Benstar, S. Bewley, K. Boyd, J. Caddick, A. Campbell, A. Cattan, G. Claden & A. Day (1998). Teaching Medical Ethics and Law Within Medical Education: A Model for the UK Core Curriculum. Consensus Statement by Teachers of Medical Ethics and Law in UK Medical Schools. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):188-192.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kenneth M. Boyd (1998). Little Lamb, Who Made Thee? A Letter From Edinburgh. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):199-202.
    Like many other locals, I was unprepared for the global media's invasion of Roslin. The former mining village just outside the southern city limits is best known to most Edinburgh citizens for its tiny, ornately carved medieval chapel. Constructed for Crusading Knights and long associated with Freemasons, Rosslyn Chapel was made famous by Sir Walter Scott's LayoftheLastMinstrel. Nowadays it is visited, in coachloads, by devotees of less literary and historically more dubious esoterica, many of whom believe that the Holy Grail (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kenneth M. Boyd, Robert V. Brody, David A. Buehler, Daniel Callahan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Elizabeth Graham, John Harris, Steve Heilig & Søren Holm (1998). William Andereck, MD, is Chair of the Ethics Committees at California Pacific Medical Center and the Pacific Fertility Center, San Francisco, California. Lori B. Andrews, JD, is Professor of Law at Chicago-Kent College of Law and Senior Scholar at the Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, Illinois. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:117-118.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. K. M. Boyd (1997). The Oxford Practice Skills Course Manual. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):60-61.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. K. Boyd (1995). What Can Medical Ethics Learn From History? Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):197-198.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. K. M. Boyd (1995). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):62-62.
  32. K. M. Boyd (1994). Euthanasia and Other Medical Decisions Concerning the End of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):198-199.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. K. M. Boyd (1992). HIV Infection and AIDS: The Ethics of Medical Confidentiality. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (4):173-179.
    An Institute of Medical Ethics working party argues that an ethically desirable relationship of mutual empowerment between patient and clinician is more likely to be achieved if patients understand the ground rules of medical confidentiality. It identifies and illustrates ambiguities in the General Medical Council's guidance on AIDS and confidentiality, and relates this to the practice of different doctors and specialties. Matters might be clarified, it suggests, by identifying moral factors which tend to recur in medical decisions about maintaining or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jane A. Smith & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.) (1991). Lives in the Balance: The Ethics of Using Animals in Biomedical Research: The Report of a Working Party of the Institute of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the result of a three-year study undertaken by a multidisciplinary working party of the Institute of Medical Ethic (UK). The group was chaired by a moral theologian, and its members included biological and ethological scientists, toxicologists, physicians, veterinary surgeons, an expert in alternatives to animal use, officers of animal welfare organizations, a Home Office Inspector, philosophers, and a lawyer. Coming from these different backgrounds, and holding a diversity of moral views, the members produced the agreed report as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. K. Boyd (1990). The Council of Europe's First Symposium on Bioethics: Strasbourg, Dec 5-7 1989. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (2):97-98.
    This symposium discussed bioethics teaching, research and documentation and also research ethics committees. An international convention for the protection of the integrity of the human body was called for, as was a new European Committee on Ethics. 'The genetic impact' was a major preoccupation of the symposium.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. K. M. Boyd (1990). Institute of Medical Ethics: Working Party Report. HIV Infection: The Ethics of Anonymised Testing and of Testing Pregnant Women. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):173-178.
    An Institute of Medical Ethics working party supports the view that explicit permission should normally be sought in the case of testing for HIV antibody. It discusses this in relation to anonymised HIV testing for epidemiological purposes, concluding that this is to be welcomed, given certain safeguards. It next argues that pregnant women may have a greater and more immediate need than others to know their HIV status. It concludes that this need does not justify testing them without their permission, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Kenneth M. Boyd (1990). HIV Infection: The Ethics of Anonymised Testing and of Testing Pregnant Women. Institute of Medical Ethics Working Party Report. Journal of Medical Ethics 16:173-8.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. K. Boyd (1987). Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students and GP Trainees. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):132-133.
    This paper relates two experiences of teaching medical ethics, the first to a small group of clinical medical students, the second to a larger group of GP trainees.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. K. M. Boyd & B. T. Potter (1986). Priorities in the Allocation of Scarce Resources. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):197-200.
    The authors report and comment on student reactions to a clinical example of moral choice in the microallocation of scarce resources. Four patients require dialysis simultaneously, but only one kidney machine is available. What moral, as opposed to clinical, criteria are available to determine who should have priority?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. K. Boyd (1984). The Positive Aspects of Medical Ethics Today. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (3):122-123.
    The author of this comment suggests that some of the important points made by Dr Adrian Rogers are vitiated by a tendency to contrast the worst of modern medical practice with an over-idealised view of the past. The state of medical ethics today, the author suggests, is more hopeful than Dr Rogers allows.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. K. M. Boyd (1984). Consent in Medicine: Convergence and Divergence in Tradition. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):50-51.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. K. M. Boyd (1984). Expensive Medical Techniques. Report of a Working Party. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):50-50.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. K. M. Boyd (1983). Commentary: The Ethics of Resource Allocation. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):25-27.
    This commentary focuses on two moral values implied by the case study but not specified in the working party's conclusions, namely equitable treatment of the most vulnerable and the value of political government.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. K. M. Boyd (1983). Triage and Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):117-118.
  45. K. M. Boyd (1982). Moral Principles and Political Obligations. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (4):211-211.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. K. M. Boyd (1981). The Right to Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):132-136.
    For much of human history the idea of a right to life has not seemed self-evident. The credibility of the idea appears to depend on a particular kind of intuition concerning the nature of the world. In this paper, the kind of intuition involved is related to the idea of a covenant, illustrated by that of marriage. The paper concludes by suggesting that talk about responsibilities may be more fruitful than talk about rights.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. K. Boyd (1979). Tragic Choices. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):150-151.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. K. Boyd, C. Currie, I. Thompson & A. J. Tierney (1978). Teaching Medical Ethics: University of Edinburgh. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):141-145.
    The Edinburgh Medical Group Research Project is unique in Britain. Part of its function is to experiment with teaching medical ethics both inside and outside of the Medical School. The papers which follow have been written by two full-time reseach fellows working with the Project and two of the professional advisers, one nursing and one medical. Together they give a picture of the wide scope of exerimental teaching taking place in Edinburgh and present some preliminary results from these experiments.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. K. Boyd (1977). Attitudes to Death: Some Historical Notes. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (3):124-128.
    Men have been talking of death from time immemorial - sometimes sublimely in prose and poetry, in painting and sculpture and in music - till silence seemed to fall in the recent past. Now men are again talking about death - interminably but colloquially. They talk on television, on the radio, in books and in pamphlets. Dr Kenneth Boyd therefore finds it entirely timely to offer this historical sketch of attitudes to death. The earlier part of his paper covers fairly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. K. Boyd (1976). Health Care: The Growing Dilemma. Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (4):211-212.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation