Search results for 'K. C. Bhattacharyya' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ramesh Kumar Sharma (2004). Manyness of Selves, Samkhya, and K. C. Bhattacharyya. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):425-457.
    : Classical Sāmkhya, as represented by Īśvarakrsna's Sāmkhya-kārikā, is well known for its attempt to prove not only the reality but the plurality of selves (purusa-bahutva). The Sāmkhya argument, since it proceeds from the reality of the manyness of the bodies as its basic premise, approximates, even if not in every detail, the 'argument from analogy' in its traditional form (which the essay tries to explicate). One distinguished modern interpreter, K. C. Bhattacharyya, however, not satisfied with this account, attempts (...)
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  2.  2
    K. Satchidananda Murty, R. Balasubramanian & Sibajiban Bhattacharyya (eds.) (1986). Freedom, Progress, and Society: Essays in Honour of Professor K. Satchidananda Murty. Motilal Banarsidass.
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  3.  18
    Stephen Kaplan (2004). Revisiting K. C. Bhattacharyya's Concept of the Absolute and its Alternative Forms: A Holographic Model for Simultaneous Illumination. Asian Philosophy 14 (2):99 – 115.
    Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya, one of the preeminent Indian philosophers of the 20th century, proposed that the absolute appears in three alternative forms - truth, freedom and value. Each of these forms are for Bhattacharyya absolute, ultimate, not penultimate. Each is different from the other, yet they cannot be said to be one or many. He contends that these absolutes are incompatible with each other and that an articulation of the relation between the three absolutes is not feasible. This paper (...)
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    J. L. Mehta (1974). The Problem of Philosophical Reconception in the Thought of K. C. Bhattacharyya. Philosophy East and West 24 (1):59-70.
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    John E. Smith (1974). Commentary on J. L. Mehta's "the Problem of Philosophical Reconception in the Thought of K. C. Bhattacharyya". Philosophy East and West 24 (1):89-93.
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  6. Kalidas Bhattacharya (1975). The Fundamentals of K. C. Bhattacharyya's Philosophy. Saraswat Library.
     
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  7. Ramesh Chandra Sinha (1981). Concepts of Reason and Intuition: With Special Reference to Sri Aurobindo, K.C. Bhattacharyya, and Radhakrishnan. Janaki Prakashan.
     
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  8. A. K. (1999). Of Mice, Medicine, and Genetics: C. C. Little's Creation of the Inbred Laboratory Mouse, 1909-1918. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):319-343.
     
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  9. Sibajiban Bhattacharyya (1986). Gad?dhara Bha $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{t}$$ $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{t}$$ ?c?rya's Vi $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{s}$$ ayata?v?da. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 14 (2):109-193.
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  10. Sibajiban Bhattacharyya & Ashok Vohra (eds.) (1995). The Philosophy of K. Satchidananda Murty. Distributed by Indian Book Centre.
     
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  11. C. C. C. C. (1985). Sämtliche Schriften di K. Löwith. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 5 (1):180.
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  12.  16
    Randall C. O.’Reilly, Rajan Bhattacharyya, Michael D. Howard & Nicholas Ketz (2014). Complementary Learning Systems. Cognitive Science 38 (6):1229-1248.
    This paper reviews the fate of the central ideas behind the complementary learning systems (CLS) framework as originally articulated in McClelland, McNaughton, and O’Reilly (1995). This framework explains why the brain requires two differentially specialized learning and memory systems, and it nicely specifies their central properties (i.e., the hippocampus as a sparse, pattern-separated system for rapidly learning episodic memories, and the neocortex as a distributed, overlapping system for gradually integrating across episodes to extract latent semantic structure). We review the application (...)
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  13.  32
    C. K. (1976). The Early Works 1882-1892. Review of Metaphysics 29 (3):546-547.
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    C. F. K. (1973). Logic Matters. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):125-126.
  15.  51
    W. K. Clifford & C. K. (1878). On the Nature of Things-in-Themselves. Mind 3 (9):57-67.
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  16.  6
    C. F. K. (1973). Development of Mathematical Logic. Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):752-753.
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  17.  4
    C. F. K. (1973). Deductive Logic. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):139-140.
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  18.  3
    A. C., Emile Bourguet, W. H. Buckler, W. M. Calder & W. K. C. Guthrie (1935). Fouilles de Delphes. III: Epigraphie. Fasc. V: Les Comptes du IVe siecleMonumenta Asiae Minoris Antiqua, IV: Eastern Asia and Western Galatia. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:92.
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  19.  3
    W. K. Clifford & W. K. C. (1878). On the Nature of Things-in-Themselves. Mind 3 (9):57 - 67.
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  20.  4
    C. F. K. (1973). Derivation and Counterexample, an Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):136-137.
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  21. C. K. (1995). Toward a Rational History of Medical Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (3):493-502.
     
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  22.  21
    Jaysankar Shaw (2011). Freedom: East and West. Sophia 50 (3):481-497.
    This paper explains some of the uses of the word ‘freedom’ in Western as well as in Indian philosophy. Regarding the psychological concept of freedom or free will, this paper focuses on the distinction between fatalism, determinism, types of compatibilism, and libertarianism. Indian philosophers, by and large, are compatibilists, although some minor systems, such as Śākta Āgama, favor a type of libertarianism. From the Indian perspective the form of life of human beings has also been mentioned in the discussion of (...)
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  23.  29
    Daniel Raveh (2008). Ayam Aham Asmīti : Self-Consciousness and Identity in the Eighth Chapter of the Chāndogya Upanişad Vs. Śankara's Bhāşya. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (2):319-333.
    The article offers a close reading of the famous upanişadic story of Indra, Virocana and Prajāpati from the eighth chapter of the Chāndogya-Upanişad versus Śankara’s bhāşya, with special reference to the notions of suşupti and turīya. That Śankara is not always loyal to the Upanişadic texts is a well-known fact. That the Upanişads are (too) often read through Śan-kara’s Advaitic eyes is also known. The following lines will not merely illustrate the gap between text and commentary but will also reveal (...)
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  24.  22
    Zbigniew Nerczuk (1998). W.K.C. Guthrie, Filozofowie greccy od Talesa do Arystotelesa. [REVIEW] Ruch Filozoficzny 55 (1):96-100.
    This is the review of the book by W.K.C. Guthrie, Filozofowie greccy od Talesa do Arystotelesa.
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  25.  46
    Sanat Kumar Sen (1980). Thinking and Speaking in the Philosophy of K. C. Bhattacharya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (4):337-347.
    Although the following essay does not strictly fall within the discipline of classical Indian philosophy, in which our Journal specializes, we publish it here for two reasons: (1) K. C. Bhattacharya was an outstanding philosopher of India in the past generation, and his thought was deeply influenced by his thorough study of classical Indian Vedanta and Jainism, as well as by the study of Kant (four of our consulting editors were his direct students). (2) His view about the notion of (...)
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  26.  2
    Robert K. C. Forman (1991). Reply: Bagger and the Ghosts of GAA: ROBERT K. C. FORMAN. Religious Studies 27 (3):413-420.
    I am grateful for Mr Bagger's thoughtful remarks, as well as those of Professors Cousins, Smith, Katz, and Gimello at a recent American Academy of Religion panel devoted to The Problem of Pure Consciousness . But I cannot help but be struck by the tone of Mr Bagger's notice. As one colleague communicated to me after reading the piece, this is one of the most gratuitously rude pieces he had ever seen! If our book is really as bad as all (...)
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  27. C. K. Ogden (ed.) (1995). Psyche: A Journal of General and Linguistic Psychology 1920-1952. Edited by C.K. Ogden. Routledge.
    Launched in 1920 by C K Ogden and others as the successor to the Cambridge Magazine , Psyche occupied a unique place for over 30 years as a journal of general and linguistic psychology. Committed from the outset to keeping readers abreast of developments in the burgeoning fields of experimental, theoretical, and applied psychology, Psyche provided not only systematic reporting in these domains but set itself the task of stimulating research of high quality by the critical thrust of its editorial (...)
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  28. C. W. K. Mundle (1969). Philosophical Behaviourism: C. W. K. Mundle. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:119-131.
    Professor C. A. Mace, the psychologist, once wrote: ‘It is difficult … to present and defend any sort of behaviourism whatever without committing oneself to nonsense.’ I shall illustrate this thesis. I shall comment on the writings of some psychologists. This is relevant to my topic; for psychologists' expositions of behaviourism contain much more philosophy than science, and the inconsistencies which permeate their versions of behaviourism reappear in the works of eminent philosophers. My quotation from Mace comes from a paper (...)
     
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  29. Peter Beilharz (1990). Reviews : T. Cutler, K. Williams and J. Williams, Keynes, Beveridge and Beyond (Routledge, 1986); J. Clarke, A. Cochrane and C. Smart, Ideologies of Welfare: From Dreams to Disillusion (Hutchinson, 1987). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 27 (1):250-252.
    Reviews : T. Cutler, K. Williams and J. Williams, Keynes, Beveridge and Beyond ; J. Clarke, A. Cochrane and C. Smart, Ideologies of Welfare: From Dreams to Disillusion.
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  30.  5
    George C. W. Warr (1895). In Memoriam: Charles Thomas Newton, K.C.B In Memoriam: Charles Thomas Newton, K.C.B. The Classical Review 9 (01):85-.
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  31.  8
    G. C. Field (1954). Greek Philosophy: The Hub and the Spokes. By W. K. C. Guthrie. (Cambridge University Press. 1953. Pp. 29. 3s. Net.). Philosophy 29 (110):268-.
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  32.  10
    J. J. C. Smart (1962). Sir William Mitchell, K.C.M.G. (1861-1962). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):261 – 263.
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  33.  4
    C. C. J. Webb (1936). The Purpose of God. By W. R. Matthews, K.C.V.O., D.Lit., D.D., Dean of St. Paul's, Fellow of King's College, London. (London: Nisbet & Co. 1935. Pp. Xi + 182. Price 7s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 11 (43):345-.
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  34. A. C. Ewing (1929). Kant's Critique of Teleological Judgment. Translated, with an Introduction, Notes, and Analytical Index, by J. C. Meredith Litt.D., K.C., Judge of the High Court, Irish Free State. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, Humphrey Milford. 1928. Pp. Xcvii + 208. Price 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (13):120-122.
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  35. K. W. Harrington (1978). W. K. C. Guthrie's "A History of Greek Philosophy". Volume IV: "Plato: The Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (3):431.
     
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  36. Oğuz Işık & M. Melih Pınarcıoğlu (2003). Sultanbeyli: Enformelin Kurucu Yıkıcı Gücü. Cogito 35:21-27.
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  37.  7
    James McElvenny (2013). International Language and the Everyday: Contact and Collaboration Between C.K. Ogden, Rudolf Carnap and Otto Neurath. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1194-1218.
    Although now largely forgotten, the international language movement was, from the 1880s to the end of the Second World War, a matter of widespread public interest, as well as a concern of numerous scientists and scholars. The primary goal was to establish a language for international communication, but in the early twentieth century an increasing accent was placed on philosophical considerations: wanted was a language better suited to the needs of modern science and rational thought. In this paper, we examine (...)
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  38.  2
    Marta Sagastume (2005). Bounded Commutative B-C-K Logic and Lukasiewicz Logic. Manuscrito 28 (2):575-583.
    In [9] it is proved the categorical isomorphism of two varieties: bounded commutative BCK-algebras and MV -algebras. The class of MV -algebras is the algebraic counterpart of the infinite valued propositional calculus L of Lukasiewicz . The main objective of the present paper is to study that isomorphism from the perspective of logic. The B-C-K logic is algebraizable and the quasivariety of BCKalgebras is the equivalent algebraic semantics for that logic . We call commutative B-C-K logic, briefly cBCK, to the (...)
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  39.  1
    Renaud Gagné (2008). The Sins of the Fathers: C.A. Lobeck and K.O. Müller. Kernos 21.
    The notion of “inherited guilt,” or ancestral fault, has played a prominent role in scholarship on ancient Greek religion and literature. Although it corresponds to no clearly circumscribed ancient concept, it has acquired something of a self-evident value in philological research. Shaped by centuries of ideological involvement with the Greek material, and by the apparently equivalent Judeo-Christian notions of corporate responsibility and original sin, the term “inherited guilt” imposes a heavy baggage of assumptions and resonances on the material it is (...)
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  40. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1981). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus: German and English Edition (Trans. C.K. Ogden). Routledge.
    The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus first appeared in 1921 and was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme compression and brilliance, it immediately convinced many of its readers and captured the imagination of all. Its chief influence, at first, was on the Logical Positivists of the 1920s and 1930s, but many other philosophers were stimulated by its philosophy of language, finding attractive, even if ultimately unsatisfactory, its view that propositions (...)
     
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  41. L. Renou (1953). Reviews : The Sahitya-Darpana and the History of Sanskrit Poetics. BY P. V. KANE (3d Ed.) Bombay, I95I. Pp. 433+64+345. 8 . Comparative Aesthetics BY K. C. PANDEY. Vol. I. Indian Aesthetics ('Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series', Studies, Vol II). Benares, I950. Pp. 486. [REVIEW] Diogenes 1 (1):127-130.
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  42.  93
    A. Cribb (1985). Quality of Life--A Response to K C Calman. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):142-145.
    There is no technical language with which to speak of patients' quality of life, there are no standard measures and no authority to validate criteria of measurement. It is well known that 'professionals' tend, often for institutional reasons, to play down or undervalue factors which are not defined by their particular expertise. It is fortunate that, despite this tendency, there is a growing interest in broadening the evaluation of medical care, but there is still a need to clarify what is (...)
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  43.  10
    Reginald Jebb (1974). A Note on G.K.C. The Chesterton Review 1 (1):5-6.
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  44.  8
    Anthony Grist (1982). Reflections From England on G.K.C. And Christmas. The Chesterton Review 8 (1):85-88.
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    R. O. Moon (1930). The Elder Pliny's Chapters on Chemical Subjects. Part I., Edited, with Translation and Notes, by K. C. Bailey. Pp. 249. London: Arnold, 1929. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (05):204-.
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  46. P. Bicknell (1966). GUTHRIE, W. K. C.: "History of Greek Philosophy", Vol. 2. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44:115.
     
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  47.  11
    Peter Milward (2012). Three Cheers for G.K.C - From Japan. The Chesterton Review 3 (2):287-292.
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    Jonathan Riley (2003). K. C. O'Rourke, John Stuart Mill and Freedom of Expression: The Genesis of a Theory, London and New York, Routledge, 2001, Pp. Viii + 226. [REVIEW] Utilitas 15 (3):374.
  49.  10
    Josef Śkvorecky (2012). A Sort of Tribute to G.K.C. The Chesterton Review 3 (2):240-245.
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  50.  4
    Renford Bambrough (1960). The Transmission of Platonism Pierre Courcelle, W. K. C. Guthrie, Olof Gigon, H. I. Marrou, W. Theiler, J. H. Waszink, Richard Walzer: Recherches Sur la Tradition Platonicienne. (Fondation Hardt: Entretiens Sur l'Antiquité Classique, Tome Iii.) Pp. 242. Vandœuvres, Geneva: Fondation Hardt (Cambridge: Heffer), 1958. Cloth, £2 Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (01):29-31.
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