Search results for 'K. C. Bhattacharyya' (try it on Scholar)

10 found
Sort by:
  1. Ramesh Kumar Sharma (2004). Manyness of Selves, Samkhya, and K. C. Bhattacharyya. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):425-457.score: 120.0
    : Classical Sāmkhya, as represented by Īśvarakrsna's Sāmkhya-kārikā, is well known for its attempt to prove not only the reality but the plurality of selves (purusa-bahutva). The Sāmkhya argument, since it proceeds from the reality of the manyness of the bodies as its basic premise, approximates, even if not in every detail, the 'argument from analogy' in its traditional form (which the essay tries to explicate). One distinguished modern interpreter, K. C. Bhattacharyya, however, not satisfied with this account, attempts (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen Kaplan (2004). Revisiting K. C. Bhattacharyya's Concept of the Absolute and its Alternative Forms: A Holographic Model for Simultaneous Illumination. Asian Philosophy 14 (2):99 – 115.score: 93.0
    Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya, one of the preeminent Indian philosophers of the 20th century, proposed that the absolute appears in three alternative forms - truth, freedom and value. Each of these forms are for Bhattacharyya absolute, ultimate, not penultimate. Each is different from the other, yet they cannot be said to be one or many. He contends that these absolutes are incompatible with each other and that an articulation of the relation between the three absolutes is not feasible. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel Raveh (2008). Ayam Aham Asmīti : Self-Consciousness and Identity in the Eighth Chapter of the Chāndogya Upanişad Vs. Śankara's Bhāşya. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (2):319-333.score: 90.0
    The article offers a close reading of the famous upanişadic story of Indra, Virocana and Prajāpati from the eighth chapter of the Chāndogya-Upanişad versus Śankara’s bhāşya, with special reference to the notions of suşupti and turīya. That Śankara is not always loyal to the Upanişadic texts is a well-known fact. That the Upanişads are (too) often read through Śan-kara’s Advaitic eyes is also known. The following lines will not merely illustrate the gap between text and commentary but will also reveal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jaysankar Shaw (2011). Freedom: East and West. Sophia 50 (3):481-497.score: 90.0
    This paper explains some of the uses of the word ‘freedom’ in Western as well as in Indian philosophy. Regarding the psychological concept of freedom or free will, this paper focuses on the distinction between fatalism, determinism, types of compatibilism, and libertarianism. Indian philosophers, by and large, are compatibilists, although some minor systems, such as Śākta Āgama, favor a type of libertarianism. From the Indian perspective the form of life of human beings has also been mentioned in the discussion of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. J. L. Mehta (1974). The Problem of Philosophical Reconception in the Thought of K. C. Bhattacharyya. Philosophy East and West 24 (1):59-70.score: 90.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kalidas Bhattacharya (1975). The Fundamentals of K. C. Bhattacharyya's Philosophy. Saraswat Library.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ramesh Chandra Sinha (1981). Concepts of Reason and Intuition: With Special Reference to Sri Aurobindo, K.C. Bhattacharyya, and Radhakrishnan. Janaki Prakashan.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John E. Smith (1974). Commentary on J. L. Mehta's "the Problem of Philosophical Reconception in the Thought of K. C. Bhattacharyya". Philosophy East and West 24 (1):89-93.score: 90.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jitendra N. Mohanty (1972). Phenomenology and Existentialism. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (4):485-511.score: 30.0
    The article seeks a confrontation between phenomenology - in its husserlian and existential forms - with indian philosophy, Particularly the nyaya--Vaisesika, Samkhya--Vedanta and buddhist schools. Confrontation with husserlian phenomenology is carried through under three headings: (a) methodology, (b) theory of the 'eidos' and (c) the notion of transcendental subjectivity. Despite close affinities, Indian thought is found to lack the dialectics of intention and fulfillment and the supposed temporality and historicity of transcendental subjectivity. The existential concepts of 'sorge' and 'geworfenheit' are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. S. Radhakrishnan (1952). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. London, G. Allen & Unwin.score: 29.0
    Gandhi, M. K. [Answers to three questions]--Tagore, R. The religion of an artist.--Abhedānanda, Swāmi. Hindu philosophy in India.--Bhattacharyya, H. The principle of activism.--Bhattacharyya, K. C. The concept of philosophy.--Chatterji, G. C. Common-sense empiricism.--Coomaraswamy, A. K. On the pertinence of philosophy.--Damle, N. G. The faith of an idealist.--Das, B. Ătma-vidyā, or The science of self.--Das, R. Pursuit of truth through doubt and belief.--Dasgupta, S. Philosophy of dependent emergence.--Datta, D. M. Knowledge, reality and the unknown.--Haldar, H. Realistic idealism.--.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation