9 found
Sort by:
  1. K. J. Gilhooly, Linden J. Ball & Laura Macchi (2014). Insight and Creative Thinking Processes: Routine and Special. Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):1-4.
    In recent years there has been an upsurge of research aimed at removing the mystery from insight and creative problem solving. The present special issue reflects this expanding field. Overall the papers gathered here converge on a nuanced view of insight and creative thinking as arising from multiple processes that can yield surprising solutions through a mixture of “special” Type 1 processes and “routine” Type 2 processes.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. K. J. Gilhooly, G. J. Georgiou, M. Sirota & A. Paphiti-Galeano (2014). Incubation and Suppression Processes in Creative Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):130-146.
    The present study investigated the role of thought suppression in incubation, using a delayed incubation paradigm. A total of 301 participants were tested over five conditions, viz., continuous work control, incubation with a mental rotations interpolated task, focussed suppression, unfocussed suppression and a conscious expression condition. Checks were made for intermittent work during the incubation condition. The target task was alternative uses for a brick. In the incubation and suppression conditions, participants worked for 4 minutes, then had a break during (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. E. Fioratou & K. J. Gilhooly (2011). Executive Functions in Insight Versus Non-Insight Problem Solving: An Individual Differences Approach. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (4):355-376.
    This study investigated the roles of the executive functions of inhibition and switching, and of verbal and visuo-spatial working memory capacities, in insight and non-insight tasks. A total of 18 insight tasks, 10 non-insight tasks, and measures of individual differences in working memory capacities, switching, and inhibition were administered to 120 participants. Performance on insight problems was not linked with executive functions of inhibition or switching but was linked positively to measures of verbal and visuo-spatial working memory capacities. Non-insight task (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. K. J. Gilhooly, V. Wynn, L. H. Phillips, R. H. Logie & S. Della Sala (2002). Visuo-Spatial and Verbal Working Memory in the Five-Disc Tower of London Task: An Individual Differences Approach. Thinking and Reasoning 8 (3):165 – 178.
    This paper reports a study of the roles of visuo-spatial and verbal working memory capacities in solving a planning task - the five-disc Tower of London (TOL) task. An individual differences approach was taken. Sixty adult participants were tested on 20 TOL tasks of varying difficulty. Total moves over the 20 TOL tasks was taken as a measure of performance. Participants were also assessed on measures of fluid intelligence (Raven's matrices), verbal short-term storage (Digit span), verbal working memory span (Silly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. K. J. Gilhooly, L. H. Phillips, V. Wynn, R. H. Logie & S. Della Sala (1999). Planning Processes and Age in the Five-Disc Tower of London Task. Thinking and Reasoning 5 (4):339-361.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. K. J. Gilhooly, L. H. Phillips, V. Wynn, R. H. Logie & S. Della Sala (1999). Planning Processes and Age in the Five-Disc Tower of London Task. Thinking and Reasoning 5 (4):339 – 361.
    This paper reports a study of planning processes in the five-disc Tower of London (TOL) task in 20 younger and 20 older adult participants. A concurrent direct ''think-aloud'' method was used to obtain data on planning processes prior to moving discs in the TOL. A check was made of the effects of verbalising by comparing performance data from the experimental groups with data from control groups who did not verbalise during planning or moving. Verbalising slowed down planning and moving but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. K. J. Gilhooly (1994). Creativity Theory: Detail and Testability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):544-545.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. K. J. Gilhooly (1993). Working Memory and its Extensions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):761.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation