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  1. R. V. Carlson, N. H. van Ginneken, L. M. Pettigrew, A. Davies, K. M. Boyd & D. J. Webb (2007). The Three Official Language Versions of the Declaration of Helsinki: What's Lost in Translation? Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):545-548.
    Background: The Declaration of Helsinki, the World Medical Association’s statement of ethical guidelines regarding medical research, is published in the three official languages of the WMA: English, French and Spanish.Methods: A detailed comparison of the three official language versions was carried out to determine ways in which they differed and ways in which the wording of the three versions might illuminate the interpretation of the document.Results: There were many minor linguistic differences between the three versions. However, in paragraphs 1, 6, (...)
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  2. R. Parks, P. M. Warren, K. M. Boyd, H. Cameron, A. Cumming & G. Lloyd-Jones (2006). The Objective Structured Clinical Examination and Student Collusion: Marks Do Not Tell the Whole Truth. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):734-738.
    Objective: To determine whether the marks in the third year Objective Structured Clinical Examination were affected by the collusion reported by the students themselves on an electronic discussion board.Design: A review of the student discussion, examiners’ feedback and a comparison of the marks obtained on the 2 days of the OSCE.Participants: 255 third year medical students.Setting: An OSCE consisting of 15 stations, administered on three sites over 2 days at a UK medical school.Results: 40 students contributed to the discussion on (...)
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  3. K. M. Boyd (2005). Medical Ethics: Principles, Persons, and Perspectives: From Controversy to Conversation. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):481-486.
    Medical ethics, principles, persons, and perspectives is discussed under three headings: History, Theory, and Practice. Under Theory, the author will say something about some different approaches to the study and discussion of ethical issues in medicine—especially those based on principles, persons, or perspectives. Under Practice, the author will discuss how one perspectives based approach, hermeneutics, might help in relation first to everyday ethical issues and then to public controversies. In that context some possible advantages of moving from controversy to conversation (...)
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  4. K. M. Boyd (2002). Mrs Pretty and Ms B. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):211-212.
    Was society’s response adequate in the cases of Mrs Pretty and Ms B?On the 11th of May, less than two weeks after losing her final legal appeal, Mrs Diane Pretty died, under sedation and in the care of a hospice. It was not the end she had pursued through the English High Court, the Court of Appeal, the House of Lords, and the European Court of Human Rights. Paralysed by motor neurone disease and unable to take her own life, Mrs (...)
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  5. K. M. Boyd (2001). Disability. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):361-362.
    The symposium in this issue, on equality and disability, helps to clarify some areas of continuing disagreement in disability studies, but also uncovers substantial consensus. All of the contributors appear to endorse John Harris's statement that “No disability, however slight, nor however severe, implies lesser moral, political or ethical status, worth, or value”.1 It seems safe to assume, moreover, that few if any readers of the Journal of Medical Ethics are likely to disagree with this, or indeed to challenge Kate (...)
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  6. K. M. Boyd (2000). An AIDS Lexicon. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (1):66-76.
    AIDSThe sudden appearance of a truly new disease is a wake-up call. A new global pandemic of an infectious agent, transmitted through sexual contact and blood, affecting alienated and/or deprived people and communities, infectious throughout, that causes a slowly progressive breakdown of defence against other infectious diseases, as well as causing dementia in some, and leads to a premature death, occurring in an era of extensive travel and rapid communication, is a veritable tocsin. These crude ingredients of AIDS as a (...)
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  7. K. M. Boyd (2000). Disease, Illness, Sickness, Health, Healing and Wholeness: Exploring Some Elusive Concepts. Medical Humanities 26 (1):9-17.
    Concepts such as disease and health can be difficult to define precisely. Part of the reason for this is that they embody value judgments and are rooted in metaphor. The precise meaning of terms like health, healing and wholeness is likely to remain elusive, because the disconcerting openness of the outlook gained from experience alone resists the reduction of first-person judgments (including those of religion) to third-person explanations (including those of science).
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  8. K. M. Boyd (1997). The Oxford Practice Skills Course Manual. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):60-61.
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  9. K. M. Boyd (1995). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):62-62.
  10. K. M. Boyd (1994). Euthanasia and Other Medical Decisions Concerning the End of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):198-199.
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  11. K. M. Boyd (1992). HIV Infection and AIDS: The Ethics of Medical Confidentiality. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (4):173-179.
    An Institute of Medical Ethics working party argues that an ethically desirable relationship of mutual empowerment between patient and clinician is more likely to be achieved if patients understand the ground rules of medical confidentiality. It identifies and illustrates ambiguities in the General Medical Council's guidance on AIDS and confidentiality, and relates this to the practice of different doctors and specialties. Matters might be clarified, it suggests, by identifying moral factors which tend to recur in medical decisions about maintaining or (...)
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  12. K. M. Boyd (1990). Institute of Medical Ethics: Working Party Report. HIV Infection: The Ethics of Anonymised Testing and of Testing Pregnant Women. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):173-178.
    An Institute of Medical Ethics working party supports the view that explicit permission should normally be sought in the case of testing for HIV antibody. It discusses this in relation to anonymised HIV testing for epidemiological purposes, concluding that this is to be welcomed, given certain safeguards. It next argues that pregnant women may have a greater and more immediate need than others to know their HIV status. It concludes that this need does not justify testing them without their permission, (...)
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  13. K. M. Boyd & B. T. Potter (1986). Priorities in the Allocation of Scarce Resources. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):197-200.
    The authors report and comment on student reactions to a clinical example of moral choice in the microallocation of scarce resources. Four patients require dialysis simultaneously, but only one kidney machine is available. What moral, as opposed to clinical, criteria are available to determine who should have priority?
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  14. K. M. Boyd (1984). Consent in Medicine: Convergence and Divergence in Tradition. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):50-51.
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  15. K. M. Boyd (1984). Expensive Medical Techniques. Report of a Working Party. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):50-50.
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  16. K. M. Boyd (1983). Commentary: The Ethics of Resource Allocation. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):25-27.
    This commentary focuses on two moral values implied by the case study but not specified in the working party's conclusions, namely equitable treatment of the most vulnerable and the value of political government.
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  17. K. M. Boyd (1983). Triage and Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):117-118.
  18. K. M. Boyd (1982). Moral Principles and Political Obligations. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (4):211-211.
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  19. K. M. Boyd (1981). The Right to Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):132-136.
    For much of human history the idea of a right to life has not seemed self-evident. The credibility of the idea appears to depend on a particular kind of intuition concerning the nature of the world. In this paper, the kind of intuition involved is related to the idea of a covenant, illustrated by that of marriage. The paper concludes by suggesting that talk about responsibilities may be more fruitful than talk about rights.
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