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  1. Dr Andrew Moore, Tony Hope & K. W. M. Fulford (forthcoming). Mild Mania and Well-Being. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (3):165-177.
  2. K. W. M. Fulford (ed.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry offers the most comprehensive reference resource for this area every published - one that is essential for both students and researchers in this field.
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  3. K. W. M. Fulford & W. Van Staden (2013). Values-Based Practice: Topsy-Turvy Take-Home Messages From Ordinary Language Philosophy (and a Few Next Steps). In , The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
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  4. K. W. M. Fulford & Lubomira Radoilska (2012). Three Challenges From Delusion for Theories of Autonomy. In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press. 44-74.
    This chapter identifies and explores a series of challenges raised by the clinical concept of delusion for theories which conceive autonomy as an agency rather than a status concept. The first challenge is to address the autonomy-impairing nature of delusions consistently with their role as grounds for full legal and ethical excuse, on the one hand, and psychopathological significance as key symptoms of psychoses, on the other. The second challenge is to take into account the full logical range of delusions, (...)
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  5. K. W. M. Fulford (2011). Bringing Together Values‐Based and Evidence‐Based Medicine: UK Department of Health Initiatives in the 'Personalization' of Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):341-343.
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  6. K. W. M. Fulford (2011). Neuroscience and Values: A Case Study Illustrating Developments in Policy, Training and Research in the UK and Internationally. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):79.
    In the current climate of dramatic advances in the neurosciences, it has been widely assumed that the diagnosis of mental disorder is a matter exclusively for value-free science. Starting from a detailed case history, this paper describes how, to the contrary, values come into the diagnosis of mental disorders, directly through the criteria at the heart of psychiatry's most scientifically grounded classification, the American Psychiatric Association's DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual). Various possible interpretations of the prominence of values in psychiatric (...)
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  7. K. W. M. Fulford & John Z. Sadler (2009). Editors' Introduction. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):221-221.
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  8. K. W. M. Fulford & N. Sartorius (2009). The Secret History of ICD and the Hidden Future of DSM. In Matthew Broome Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives.
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  9. K. W. M. Fulford (2008). Values and Psychiatry. In Sidney Bloch & Stephen A. Green (eds.), Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  10. K. W. M. Fulford (2006). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a series (...)
     
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  11. Minou Friele & K. W. M. Fulford (2004). Intervening in Psychic Capacities. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (4):257-257.
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  12. MinouBernadette Friele & K. W. M. Fulford (2004). Intervening in Psychic Capacities. Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 2 (4):257-257.
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  13. K. W. M. Fulford & Anthony Colombo (2004). Professional Judgement, Critical Realism, Real People, and, Yes, Two Wrongs Can Make a Right! Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):165-173.
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  14. K. W. M. Fulford & Anthony Colombo (2004). Six Models of Mental Disorder: A Study Combining Linguistic-Analytic and Empirical Methods. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):129-144.
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  15. K. W. M. Fulford (ed.) (2003). Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Nature and Narrative is the launch volume in a new series of books entitled International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry. Nature(representing interest in the causes of a problem) and Narrative (for understanding its meanings) will introduce the field and the series, by touching on a range of issue relevant to this interdisciplinary 'border country'.
     
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  16. K. W. M. Fulford, K. J. Morris, J. Z. Sadler & G. Stanghellini (2003). Past Improbable, Future Possible: The Renaissance in Philosophy and Psychiatry. Chapter 1 (P1-41). In , Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
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  17. John Z. Sadler & K. W. M. Fulford (2003). Agency, Narrative, and Self: A Philosophical Case Conference. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):295-296.
  18. K. W. M. Fulford, D. Dickenson & T. H. Murray (2002). Human Values in Healthcare Ethics Introduction Many Voices: Human Values in Healthcare Ethics. In K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.), Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers.
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  19. K. W. M. Fulford, D. Dickenson & T. H. Murray (2002). Introduction: Many Voices: Human Values in Healthcare Ethics. In K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.), Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers.
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  20. K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) (2002). Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers.
    This volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare.
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  21. Mike Jackson & K. W. M. Fulford (2002). Psychosis Good and Bad: Values-Based Practice and the Distinction Between Pathological and Nonpathological Forms of Psychotic Experience. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):387-394.
  22. K. W. M. Fulford (2001). 'What is (Mental) Disease?': An Open Letter to Christopher Boorse. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):80-85.
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  23. K. W. M. Fulford (2000). Teleology Without Tears: Naturalism, Neo-Naturalism, and Evaluationism in the Analysis of Function Statements in Biology (and a Bet on the Twenty-First Century). Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (1):77-94.
  24. John Z. Sadler & K. W. M. Fulford (2000). Special Issue: Aristotle, Function, and Mental Disorder. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (1).
  25. K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson (1997). Response to the Commentaries. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):87-90.
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  26. K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson (1997). Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):41-65.
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  27. K. W. M. Fulford (1995). Psychiatry, Compulsory Treatment and the Value Based Model of Mental Illness. In Brenda Almond (ed.), Introducing Applied Ethics. Blackwell.
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  28. K. W. M. Fulford (1994). Creativity, Madness, and Extra Strong Al. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):542-543.
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  29. K. W. M. Fulford (1994). Introduction: Just Getting Started. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 37:1-.
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  30. K. W. M. Fulford, Grant Gillett & Janet Martin Soskice (eds.) (1994). Medicine and Moral Reasoning. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection examines prevalent assumptions in moral reasoning which are often accepted uncritically in medical ethics. It introduces a range of perspectives from philosophy and medicine on the nature of moral reasoning and relates these to illustrative problems, such as New Reproductive Technologies, the treatment of sick children, the assessment of quality of life, genetics, involuntary psychiatric treatment and abortion. In each case, the contributors address the nature and worth of the moral theories involved in discussions of the relevant issues, (...)
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  31. Andrew Moore, Tony Hope & K. W. M. Fulford (1994). Mild Mania and Well-Being. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (3):165-177.
  32. K. W. M. Fulford (1993). Bioethical Blind Spots: Four Flaws in the Field of View of Traditional Bioethics. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 1 (2):155-162.
    In this paper it is argued that bioethics has tended to emphasise: ‘high tech’ areas of medicine at the expense of ‘low tech’ areas such as psychiatry; problems arising in treatment at the expense of those associated with diagnosis; questions of fact at the expense of questions of value; and applied ethics at the expense of philosophical theory. The common factor linking these four ‘bioethical blind spots’ is a failute to recognise the full extent to which medicine is an ethical (...)
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  33. K. W. M. Fulford (1993). Mental Illness and the Mind-Brain Problem: Delusion, Belief and Searle's Theory of Intentionality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Until recently there has been little contact between the mind-brain debate in philosophy and the debate in psychiatry about the nature of mental illness. In this paper some of the analogies and disanalogies between the two debates are explored. It is noted in particular that the emphasis in modern philosophy of mind on the importance of the concept of action has been matched by a recent shift in the debate about mental illness from analyses of disease in terms of failure (...)
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  34. K. W. M. Fulford (1993). Praxis Makes Perfect: Illness as a Bridge Between Biological Concepts of Disease and Social Conceptions of Health. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (4).
    Analyses of biological concepts of disease and social conceptions of health indicate that they are structurally interdependent. This in turn suggests the need for a bridge theory of illness. The main features of such a theory are an emphasis on the logical properties of value terms, close attention to the features of the experience of illness, and an analysis of this experience as action failure, drawing directly on the internal structure of action. The practical applications of this theory are outlined (...)
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  35. K. W. M. Fulford (1993). The Politics of Psychiatry in Revolutionary Cuba. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (4):244-244.
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  36. K. W. M. Fulford (1992). The Patient-Physician Relation: The Patient as Partner, Part. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):110-111.
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  37. K. W. M. Fulford (1991). The Potential of Medicine as a Resource for Philosophy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (1).
    In addition to the neglect of philosophy by medicine, emphasized in a recent editorial in this journal, there has been an equally important neglect of medicine by philosophy. Philosophy stands to gain from medicine in three respects: in materials, the conceptual difficulties arising in the practice of medicine being key data for philosophical enquiry; in methods, these data, through their problematic character, being ideally suited to the technique of linguistic analysis; and in results, the practical requirements of medicine placing a (...)
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  38. K. W. M. Fulford (1989). Moral Theory and Medical Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    In this unique study Fulford combines the disciplines of rigorous philosophy with an intimate knowledge of psychopathology to overturn traditional hegemonies. The patient replaces the doctor at the heart of medicine. Moral theory and the logic of evaluation replace epistemology as the focus of philosophical enquiry. Ever controversial, mental illness is at the interface of philosophy and medicine. Mad or bad? Dissident or diseased? Dr Fulford shows that it is possible to achieve new insights into these traditional dilemmas, insights at (...)
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