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  1.  68
    Kaja Silverman (1996). The Threshold of the Visible World. Routledge.
    The Threshold of the Visible World advances a revolutionary new political aesthetic--Kaja Silverman explores the possibilities for looking beyond the restrictive mandates of the self, and the normative aspects of the cultural image-repertoire. She provides a detailed account of the social and psychic forces which constrain us to look and identify in normative ways, and the violence which that normativity implies. Accounting for these phenomena on both a conscious and an unconcious level, Silverman analyzes the psychic and textual conditions under (...)
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  2.  12
    Kaja Silverman (1990). [Book Review] the Acoustic Mirror, the Female Voice in Psychoanalysis and Cinema. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 16:151-169.
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  3.  6
    Marcia Butzel & Kaja Silverman (1989). The Acoustic Mirror: The Female Voice in Psychoanalysis and Cinema. Substance 18 (3):128.
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  4.  5
    William Ray & Kaja Silverman (1986). The Subject of Semiotics. Substance 15 (1):95.
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  5.  14
    Kaja Silverman (1999). The Subject. In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University 340--55.
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  6.  12
    Kaja Silverman (2009). Flesh of My Flesh. Stanford University Press.
    Through a wide-ranging discussion, that extends from Ovid and Leonardo da Vinci to Gerhard Richter, and from philosophy and literature to time-based art, Kaja ...
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  7. Kaja Silverman (2000). World Spectators. Stanford University Press.
    Combining phenomenology and psychoanalysis in highly innovative ways, this book seeks to undo the binary opposition between appearance and Being that has been in place since Plato’s parable of the cave. It is, essentially, an essay on what could be called “world love,” the possibility and necessity for psychic survival of a profound and vital erotic investment by a human being in the cosmic surround. Here, the author takes her cue from Freud’s assertion that the “loss of reality” associated with (...)
     
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