Search results for 'Kant's Beweisgrund' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Pre-Critical Proof for God's Existence.score: 363.0
    In his Beweisgrund (1762), Kant presents a sketch of "the only possible basis" for a proof of God's existence. In this essay, I attempt to present that proof as a valid and sound argument for the existence of God.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Omri Boehm (2012). Kant's Regulative Spinozism. Kant-Studien 103 (3):292-317.score: 324.0
    The question of Kant's relation to Spinozist thought has been virtually ignored over the years. I analyze Kant's pre-critical 'possibility-proof' of God's existence, elaborated in the Beweisgrund, as well as the echoes that this proof has in the first Critique, in beginning to uncover the connection between Kant's thought and Spinoza's. Kant's espousal of the Principle of Sufficient Reason [PSR] for the analysis of modality during the pre-critical period committed him, I argue, to Spinozist substance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dennis Schulting (2010). Kant's Idealism: The Current Debate. In Dennis Schulting Jacco Verburgt (ed.), Kant's Idealism. Springer.score: 252.0
    This article presents an overview of the current debate on Kant's doctrine of idealism, focussing on the metaphysical interpretations of Ameriks, Allais, Friebe, Langton, Van Cleve and Westphal, and also on Guyer's recent reassessment of Allison's latest views.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mark Timmons (2002). Motive and Rightness in Kant's Ethical System. In , Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 252.0
    Some contemporary intepreters of Kant maintain that on Kant's view fulfilling duties of virtue require doing so from the motive of duty. I argue that there are interpretive and doctinal reasons for rejecting this interpretation. However, I argue that for Kant motives can be deontically relevant; one's motives can affect the deontic status of actions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Susanne Bobzien (1988). Die Kategorien Der Freiheit Bei Kant (Kant's Categories of Freedom). Kant 1:193-220.score: 230.0
    NOTE: The English translation is listed separately. ABSTRACT: A general interpretation and close textual analysis of Kant’s theory of the categories of freedom (or categories of practical reason) in his Critique of Practical Reason. My main concerns in the paper are the following: (1) I show that Kant’s categories of freedom have primarily three functions: as conditions of the possibility for actions (i) to be free, (ii) to be comprehensible as free and (iii) to be morally evaluated. (2) I show (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Susanne Bobzien (2013). Kant's Categories of Freedom. In Kant - Analysen, Probleme, Kritik (English translation of 1988 article).score: 230.0
    ABSTRACT: A general interpretation and close textual analysis of Kant’s theory of the categories of freedom (or categories of practical reason) in his Critique of Practical Reason. My main concerns in the paper are the following: (1) I show that Kant’s categories of freedom have primarily three functions: as conditions of the possibility for actions (i) to be free, (ii) to be comprehensible as free and (iii) to be morally evaluated. (2) I show that for Kant actions, although qua theoretical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kenneth R. Westphal (1995). ‘Kant’s Proof of the Law of Inertia’. In H. Robinson (ed.), Proceedings of the 8th International Kant Congress. Marquette University Press.score: 230.0
    According to Kant’s Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, a proper science is organized according to rational principles and has a pure a priori rational part, its metaphysical foundation. In the second edition Preface to the first Critique, Kant claims that his account of time explains the a priori possibility of Newton’s laws of motion. I argue that Kant’s proof of the law of inertia fails, and that this casts doubt on Kant’s enterprise of providing a priori foundations for Newton’s physics.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Wolfgang Ertl (2002). Hume's Antinomy and Kant's Critical Turn. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (4):617-640.score: 224.0
    The aim of this paper is to confirm that it was Hamann's translation of Hume's "Treatise" (I.4.7) which triggered Kant's critical turn in 1768/69. If this is indeed so, then Kant's inaugural dissertation must be reassessed, in particular the doctrine, to be found there, that we have cognitive access to the intelligible world. This doctrine is part of a strategy for tackling the problem highlighted by Hume; that there may be conflicting principles at work in the human mind, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kenneth R. Westphal (1998). ‘On Hegel’s Early Critique of Kant’s Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science’. In S. Houlgate (ed.), Hegel and the Philosophy of Nature. SUNY.score: 224.0
    In 1801 Hegel charged that, on Kant’s analysis, forces are ‘either purely ideal, in which case they are not forces, or else they are transcendent’. I argue that this objection, which Hegel did not spell out, reveals an important and fundamental line of internal criticism of Kant’s Critical philosophy. I show that Kant’s basic forces of attraction and repulsion, which constitute matter, are merely ideal because Kant’s arguments for them are circular and beg the question, and they have no determinate (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jacqueline Mariña & West Lafayette (2000). Making Sense of Kant's Highest Good. Kant-Studien 91 (3):329-355.score: 222.0
    This paper explores Kant's concept of the highest good and the postulate of the existence of God arising from it. Kant has two concepts of the highest good standing in tension with one another, an immanent and a transcendent one. I provide a systematic exposition of the constituents of both variants and show how Kant’s arguments are prone to confusion through a conflation of both concepts. I argue that once these confusions are sorted out Kant’s claim regarding the need (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Anja Jauernig (2008). Kant's Critique of the Leibnizian Philosophy : Contra the Leibnizians, but Pro Leibniz. In Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press.score: 222.0
    It is argued that the popular story that portrays Kant’s philosophical development as a gradual emancipation from his Leibniz-Wolffian roots that culminated in a total rejection of the Leibnizian philosophy by 1781 is not accurate. Kant’s many objections against the Leibnizian philosophy in the critical period are not directed against Leibniz himself but against the Leibniz-Wolffians. Kant considers Leibniz’s philosophy to be very close to his own, calling the Critique of Pure Reason the “true apology” of Leibniz. It is claimed (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Uygar Abaci (2014). Kant's Only Possible Argument and Chignell's Real Harmony. Kantian Review 19 (1):1-25.score: 216.0
    Andrew Chignell recently proposed an original reconstruction of Kant's for the existence of God. Chignell claims that what motivates the of Kant's proof, , is the requirement that the predicates of a really possible thing must be , i.e. compatible in an extra-logical or metaphysical sense. I take issue with Chignell's reconstruction. First, the pre-Critical Kant does not present as a general condition of real possibility. Second, the real harmony requirement is not what motivates the of the proof. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Andrew Chignell (2010). Real Repugnance and Belief About Things-in-Themselves: A Problem and Kant's Three Solutions. In James Krueger & Benjamin Bruxvoort Lipscomb (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics. Walter DeGruyter.score: 208.0
    Kant says that it can be rational to accept propositions on the basis of non-epistemic or broadly practical considerations, even if those propositions include “transcendental ideas” of supersensible objects. He also worries, however, about how such ideas (of freedom, the soul, noumenal grounds, God, the kingdom of ends, and things-in-themselves generally) acquire genuine positive content in the absence of an appropriate connection to intuitional experience. How can we be sure that the ideas are not empty “thought-entities (Gedankendinge)”—that is, speculative fancies (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Dennis Schulting (2010). Limitation and Idealism: Kant's 'Long' Argument From the Categories. In Dennis Schulting Jacco Verburgt (ed.), Kant's Idealism. Springer.score: 208.0
    I argue, without offering what Ameriks has called a 'short argument', that idealism follows already from the constraints that the use of the categories, in particular the categories of quality, places on the conceivability of things in themselves. My claim is that, although it is not only possible but also necessary to think things in themselves, it doesn't follow that by merely thinking we have a full grasp of the nature of things in themselves. For support, I look to a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ian Hunter (2012). Kant's Political Thought in the Prussian Enlightenment. In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 208.0
    This article provides an historical account of Kant's political, legal, and religious thought in the context of the Prussian Enlightenment.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Benjamin Vilhauer (2008). Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will.score: 208.0
    This paper concerns the role of the transcendental distinction between agents qua phenomena and qua noumena in Kant's theory of free will. It argues (1) that Kant's incompatibilism can be accommodated if one accepts the "ontological" interpretation of this distinction (i.e. the view that agents qua noumena are ontologically prior to agents qua phenomena), and (2) that Kant's incompatibilism cannot be accommodated by the "two-aspect" interpretation, whose defining feature is the rejection of the ontological priority of agents (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Dennis Schulting (forthcoming). Transcendental Apperception and Consciousness in Kant's Lectures on Metaphysics. In Robert Clewis (ed.), Reading Kant's Lectures.score: 208.0
    I shall focus on one topic in chiefly the metaphysics lectures that are contemporaneous with Kant’s Critical phase. I look at one particular, though crucial, element, namely transcendental apperception and the notion of ‘consciousness’ and explore to what extent, and in which context, they are featured in the lectures and what changes (or not) from the pre-Critical to the Critical phase of Kant’s lecturing activity. After introducing the theme of apperception and consciousness in Kant and addressing some terminological issues, I (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Helga Varden (2014). Patriotism, Poverty, and Global Justice: A Kantian Engagement with Pauline Kleingeld's Kant and Cosmopolitanism. Kantian Review 19 (2):251-266.score: 204.0
    In this article I critically engage some of the philosophical ideas Kleingeld presents in Kant and Cosmopolitanism, namely patriotism, poverty and global justice. Against Kleingeld, I propose, first, that perhaps democracy is less important and affectionate love more so to both Kant himself as well as to an account that can successfully refute a Bernard Williams style objection to Kantian patriotism; second, that guaranteeing unconditional poverty relief for all its citizens is constitutive of the minimally just state for Kant; and, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Md Abdul Muhit (2012). On the Concept of "Freedom" in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Philosophy and Progress 50 (1-2):9-30.score: 196.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Marilia Espirito Santo (2011). On the Transcendental Deduction in Kant's Groundwork III. On the Transcendental Deduction in Kant’s Groundwork Iii 4 (30):1 - 19.score: 196.0
    The purpose of the third section of Kant�s Groundwork is to prove the possibility of the categorical imperative. In the end of the second section, Kant establishes that a proof like this is necessary to show that morality is �something� and �not a chimerical idea without any truth� or a �phantom� (1785: 445). Since the categorical imperative was established as a synthetic a priori practical proposition, in order to prove its possibility it is necessary �to go beyond cognition of objects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Patrick Kain (2003). Prudential Reason in Kant's Anthropology. In Brian Jacobs & Patrick Kain (eds.), Essays on Kant's Anthropology. Cambridge University Press. 230--265.score: 196.0
    Within the theory of rational agency found in Kant's anthropology lectures and sketched in the moral philosophy, prudence is the manifestation of a distinctive, nonmoral rational capacity concerned with one's own happiness or well-being. Contrary to influential claims that prudential reasons are mere prima facie or "candidate" reasons, prudence can be seen to be a genuine manifestation of rational agency, involving a distinctive sort of normative authority, an authority distinguishable from and conceptually prior to that of moral norms, though (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Alison Ross (2009). What is the Force of Law in Kant's Practical Philosophy? Parallax 51 (1):27-41.score: 196.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Pauline Kleingeld (2003). Kant’s Cosmopolitan Patriotism. Kant-Studien 94 (3):299-316.score: 186.0
    Patriotism and cosmopolitanism are often presumed to be mutually exclusive, but Immanuel Kant defends both. Although he is best known for his moral and political cosmopolitanism, in several texts he defends the claim that we have a duty of patriotism, claiming that cosmopolitans ought to be patriotic. In this paper, I examine Kant’s different accounts of the duty of patriotism. I argue that Kant’s defense of nationalist patriotism fails, but that his argument for a duty of civic patriotism succeeds.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Corey W. Dyck (2011). Turning the Game Against the Idealist: Mendelssohn's Refutation of Idealism and Kant's Replies. In R. W. Munk (ed.), Mendelssohn's Aesthetics and Metaphysics.score: 186.0
    While there is good reason to think that Mendelssohn's Morgenstunden targets some of the key claims of Kant’s first Critique, this criticism has yet to be considered in the appropriate context or presented in all of its systematic detail. I show that far from being an isolated assault, Mendelssohn’s attack in the Morgenstunden is a continuation and development of his earlier criticism of Kant’s idealism as presented in the Inaugural Dissertation. I also show that Mendelssohn’s objection was more influential on (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Robert S. Taylor (2010). Kant's Political Religion: The Transparency of Perpetual Peace and the Highest Good. Review of Politics 72 (1):1-24.score: 186.0
    Scholars have long debated the relationship between Kant’s doctrine of right and his doctrine of virtue (including his moral religion or ethico-theology), which are the two branches of his moral philosophy. This article will examine the intimate connection in his practical philosophy between perpetual peace and the highest good, between political and ethico-religious communities, and between the types of transparency peculiar to each. It will show how domestic and international right provides a framework for the development of ethical communities, including (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Corey W. Dyck (2010). The Aeneas Argument: Personality and Immortality in Kant's Third Paralogism. Kant Yearbook 2 (1):95-122.score: 186.0
    In this paper, I challenge the assumption that Kant’s Third Paralogism has to do, first and foremost, with the question of personal identity.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jacqueline Mariña (1998). Kant's Derivation of the Formula of the Categorical Imperative: How to Get It Right. Kant-Studien 89 (2):167-178.score: 186.0
    This paper explores the charge by Bruce Aune and Allen Wood that a gap exists in Kant's derivation of the Categorical Imperative. I show that properly understood, no such gap exists, and that the deduction of the Categorical Imperative is successful as it stands.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Henny Blomme (2012). The Completeness of Kant's Metaphysical Exposition of Space. Kant-Studien 103 (2):139-162.score: 186.0
    In the first edition of his book on the completeness of Kant’s table of judgments, Klaus Reich shortly indicates that the B-version of the metaphysical exposition of space in the Critique of pure reason is structured following the inverse order of the table of categories. In this paper, I develop Reich’s claim and provide further evidence for it. My argumentation is as follows: Through analysis of our actually given representation of space as some kind of object (the formal intuition of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert S. Taylor (2006). Democratic Transitions and the Progress of Absolutism in Kant's Political Thought. Journal of Politics 68 (3):556-570.score: 186.0
    Against several recent interpretations, I argue in this paper that Immanuel Kant's support for enlightened absolutism was a permanent feature of his political thought that fit comfortably within his larger philosophy, though he saw such rule as part of a transition to democratic self-government initiated by the absolute monarch himself. I support these contentions with (1) a detailed exegesis of Kant’s essay "What is Enlightenment?" (2) an argument that Kantian republicanism requires not merely a separation of powers but also (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.score: 186.0
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character are involved (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.score: 186.0
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Karin de Boer (2014). Kant's Multi-Layered Conception of Things in Themselves, Transcendental Objects, and Monads. Kant-Studien 105 (2):221-260.score: 186.0
    While Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason maintains that things in themselves cannot be known, he also seems to assert that they affect our senses and produce representations. Following Jacobi, many commentators have considered these claims to be contradictory. Instead of adding another artificial solution to the existing literature on this subject, I maintain that Kant’s use of terms such as thing-in-itself, noumenon, and transcendental object becomes perfectly consistent if we take them to acquire a different meaning in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeremy Byrd (2008). Kant's Compatibilism in the New Eludication of the First Principles of Metaphysical Cognition. Kant-Studien 99 (1):68-79.score: 186.0
    It is generally assumed that, during his early pre-critical phase, Kant accepted a Leibnizian account of freedom according to which we are free to do otherwise than we do even though our actions are determined. This assumption is false. Far from endorsing such an account, Kant explicitly argues in the "New Elucidation of the First Principle of Metaphysical Cognition" (1755) that there is no relevant sense in which we can do otherwise than we do. Nevertheless, he is equally convinced that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jochen Briesen (2013). Is Kant (W)Right? – On Kant’s Regulative Ideas and Wright’s Entitlements. Kant-Yearbook 5 (1):1-32.score: 186.0
    This paper discusses a structural analogy between Kant’s theory of regulative ideas, as he develops it in the Appendix to the Transcendental Dialectic, and Crispin Wright’s theory of epistemic entitlements. First, I argue that certain exegetical difficulties with respect to the Appendix rest on serious systematic problems, which – given other assumptions of the Critique of Pure Reason – Kant is unable to solve. Second, I argue that because of the identified structural analogy between Kant’s and Wright’s views the project (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Holly L. Wilson (2011). The Pragmatic Use of Kant’s Physical Geography Lectures. In Stuart Elden & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.), Reading Kant's Geography. State University of New York Press.score: 186.0
    Kant gave lectures on physical geography and anthropology and called them cosmopolitan philosophy. His physical geography lectures were intended to teach students not just facts but also how to have practical judgment (Klugheit) and were to prepare students for their place in the world. This article shows how the physical geography lectures were organized for that purpose.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Brian Chance (2013). Causal Powers, Hume's Early German Critics, and Kant's Response to Hume. Kant-Studien 104 (2):213-236.score: 186.0
    Eric Watkins has argued on philosophical, textual, and historical grounds that Kant’s account of causation in the first Critique should not be read as an attempt to refute Hume’s account of causation. In this paper, I challenge the arguments for Watkins’ claim. Specifically, I argue (1) that Kant’s philosophical commitments, even on Watkins’ reading, are not obvious obstacles to refuting Hume, (2) that textual evidence from the “Disciple of Pure Reason” suggests Kant conceived of his account of causation as such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Nikolay Milkov (2013). Kant’s Transcendental Turn as a Second Phase in the Logicization of Philosophy. In Stefano Bacin (ed.), Kant and Philosophy in a Cosmopolitan Sense, vol. 1. de Gruyter. 653-666.score: 186.0
    This paper advances an assessment of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason made from a bird’s eye view. Seen from this perspective, the task of Kant’s work was to ground the spontaneity of human reason, preserving at the same time the strict methods of science and mathematics. Kant accomplished this objective by reviving an old philosophical discipline: the peirastic dialectic of Plato and Aristotle. What is more, he managed to combine it with logic. From this blend, Kant’s transcendental idealism appeared as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Karin de Boer (2010). Pure Reason's Enlightenment: Transcendental Reflection in Kant's First Critique. Kant Yearbook 2:53-73.score: 186.0
    In this article I aim to clarify the nature of Kant’s transformation of rationalist metaphysics into a science by focusing on his conception of transcendental reflection. The aim of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, it is argued, consists primarily in liberating the productive strand of former general metaphysics – its reflection on the a priori elements of all knowledge – from the uncritical application of these elements to all things (within general metaphysics itself) and to things that can only be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael Hymers (1997). Kant's Private-Clock Argument. Kant-Studien 88 (4):442-461.score: 186.0
    Examining the effectiveness of the Kant’s Refutation of Idealism as a critique of a Cartesian account of consciousness, I argue that Kant's reasoning turns on the insight that self-knowledge presupposes independent temporal determination of the self. This insight bears an intriguing resemblance to claims about meaning and justification that appear in Wittgenstein's later work. Much as Wittgenstein rules out the possibility of a private language, whose meanings derive from acts of inner ostensive definition, on the ground that language requires (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Bart Vandenabeele (2012). Beauty, Disinterested Pleasure, and Universal Communicability: Kant's Response to Burke. Kant-Studien 103 (2):207-233.score: 186.0
    Although Kant (wrongly) holds that the universal communicability of aesthetic judgments logically follows from the disinterested character of the pleasure upon which they are based, Kant's emphasis on the a priori validity of judgments of beauty can be viewed as a rebuttal of the kind of empiricist arguments that Burke offers to justify the social nature of the experience of beauty. I argue that the requirement of universal communicability is not a mere addition to the requirement of universal validity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Lawrence Pasternack (2010). Kant’s Doctrinal Belief in God. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant, Vol. 3.score: 186.0
    In the Canon of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant endorses both a Moral Belief in God as well as what he there calls Doctrinal Belief. The former mode of belief is well known and can be found throughout the Kantian Corpus. The latter, however, is far more obscure and thus far has not been carefully studied. Doctrinal Belief only appears explicitly in the Canon, but is related to a number of issues in the Transcendental Dialectic as well as the (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Lara Denis (2003). Kant's Criticism of Atheism. Kant-Studien 94 (2):198-219.score: 182.0
    Although Kant argues that morality is prior to and independent of religion, Kant nevertheless claims that religion of a certain sort (“moral theism”) follows from morality, and that atheism poses threats to morality. Kant criticizes atheism as morally problematic in four ways: atheism robs the atheist of springs for moral action, leads the atheist to moral despair, corrupts the atheist’s moral character, and has a pernicious influence on the atheist’s community. I argue that Kant is right to say that moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mark Timmons (1998). Decision Procedures, Moral Criteria, and the Problem of Relevant Descriptions in Kant's Ethics. In B. Sharon Byrd, Joachim Hruschka & Jan C. Joerdan (eds.), Jahrbuch fur Recht und Ethik (Annual for Law and Ethics). Duncker & Humblot.score: 180.0
    I argue that the Universal Law formulation of the Categorical Imperative is best interpreted as a test or decision procedure of moral rightness and not as a criterion intended to explain the deontic status of actions. Rather, the Humanity formulation is best interpreted as a moral criterion. I also argue that because the role of a moral criterion is to explain, and thus specify what makes an action right or wrong, Kant's Humanity formulation yields a theory of relevant descriptions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Critique of the Ontological Argument: FAIL.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I argue that Kant's famous critique of the Ontological Argument largely begs the question against that argument, and is no better when supplemented by the modern quantificational analysis of "exists." In particular, I argue that the claim, common to Hume and Kant, that conceptual truths can never entail substantive existential claims is false,and thus no ground for rejecting the Ontological Argument.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Dennis Schulting (2009). Kant's Copernican Analogy: Beyond the Non-Specific Reading. Studi Kantiani 22:39-65.score: 180.0
    References to Kant's so-called Copernicanism or Copernican turn are often put in very general terms. It is commonly thought that Kant makes the Copernican analogy solely in order to point out the fact as such of a paradigm shift in philosophy. This is too historical an interpretation of the analogy. It leaves unexplained both Kant's and Copernicus' reasons for advancing their respective hypotheses, which brought about major changes in the conceptual schemes of philosophy and astronomy. My contention is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Pauline Kleingeld (1998). Kant's Cosmopolitan Law: World Citizenship for a Global Order. Kantian Review 2:72-90.score: 180.0
    Kant's unduly neglected concept of cosmopolitan law suggests a third sphere of public law -- in addition to constitutional law and international law -- in which both states and individuals have rights, and where individuals have these rights as ‛citizens of the earth' rather than as citizens of particular states. I critically examine Kant's view of cosmopolitan law, discussing its addressees, content, justification, and institutionalization. I argue that Kant's conception of ‛world citizenship' is neither merely metaphorical nor (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Nicholas Stang (forthcoming). Kant's Argument That Existence is Not a Determination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I examine Kant’s famous objection to the ontological argument: existence is not a determination. Previous commentators have not adequately explained what this claim means, how it undermines the ontological argument, or how Kant argues for it. I argue that the claim that existence is not a determination means that it is not possible for there to be non-existent objects; necessarily, there are only existent objects. I argue further that Kant’s primary target is not ontological arguments as such (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ian Proops (2005). Kant's Conception of Analytic Judgment. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):588–612.score: 180.0
    In the Critique of Pure Reason Kant appears to characterize analytic judgments in four distinct ways: once in terms of “containment,” a second time in terms of “identity,” a third time in terms of the explicative–ampliative contrast, and a fourth time in terms of the notion of “cognizability in accordance with the principle of contradiction.” The paper asks: Which of these characterizations—or apparent characterizations—best captures Kant’s conception of analyticity in the first Critique? It suggests: “the second.” It argues, further, that (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Ian Proops (2003). Kant's Legal Metaphor and the Nature of a Deduction. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):209-229.score: 180.0
    This essay partly builds on and partly criticizes a striking idea of Dieter Henrich. Henrich argues that Kant's distinction in the first Critique between the question of fact (quid facti) and the question of law (quid juris) provides clues to the argumentative structure of a philosophical "Deduction". Henrich suggests that the unity of apperception plays a role analogous to a legal factum. By contrast, I argue, first, that the question of fact in the first Critique is settled by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000