Search results for 'Karen Ann Watson-Gegeo' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Karen Ann Watson-Gegeo & David Welchman Gegeo (2011). Divergent Discourses: The Epistemology of Healing in an American Medical Clinic and a Kwara'ae Village. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):209-233.score: 1980.0
    Using the theoretical constructs “biographical disruption” and “limit experience” and also methodological frameworks from autoethnography and discourse analysis, we discuss the divergent ways in which language and healing are conceptualized and performed, first in an American medical clinic and then by traditional healers in Kwara‘ae (Solomon Islands). Discourses at the Dallas clinic draw on allopathic and complementary medicine and in emphasizing a scientific approach to talk about illness and treatment, were found to create ambiguity in patients’ sense of their physical (...)
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  2. Karen Ann Watson‐Gegeo (2001). Fantasy and Reality: The Dialectic of Work and Play in Kwara'ae Children's Lives. Ethos 29 (2):138-158.score: 198.0
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  3. Karen Ann Watson‐Gegeo (2004). A Different World: Embodied Experience and Linguistic Relativity on the Epistemological Path to Somewhere. Anthropology of Consciousness 15 (2):1-23.score: 198.0
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  4. Jeffrey L. Lewis & Karen Ann Watson‐Gegeo (2004). Fictions of Childhood: Toward a Sociohistorical Approach to Human Development. Ethos 32 (1):3-33.score: 198.0
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  5. Michael Chappell (2004). Iliad I and Odyssey VI–Vii P. A. Draper (Ed.): Homer: Iliad, Book 1 . Pp. VI + 193. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2002. Paper, $22.95. Isbn: 0-472-06792-3. J. Watson (Ed.): Homer: Odyssey VI and VII . Pp. VIII + 114, Ills. London: Bristol Classical Press, 2002. Paper, £9.99. Isbn: 1-85399-489-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):275-.score: 120.0
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  6. Jeffery L. Nicholas (1999). Lenore Langsdorf, Stephen H. Watson, and Karen A. Smith, Eds., Reinterpreting the Political: Continental Philosophy and Political Theory Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 19 (3):196-198.score: 120.0
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  7. Kate Fullbrook & Edward Fullbrook (1998). Book Review: Debra B. Bergoffen. The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1997. And Eva Lundgren-Gothlin. Translated by Linda Schenk. Sex and Existence: Simone de Beauvoir's the Second Sex. London: Athlone, 1996. And Karen Vintges. Translated by Anne Lavelle. Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):181-188.score: 50.0
  8. Karen Ní Mheallaigh (2006). Cueva (E.P.) The Myths of Fiction. Studies in the Canonical Greek Novels. Pp. X + 154. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2004. Cased, US$47.50. ISBN: 0-472-11427-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):514-.score: 36.0
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  9. Francis Watson (1993). Ann Loades and Michael McLain (Eds). Hermeneutics, the Bible and Literary Criticism, Studies in Literature and Religion. Pp. Xi+199. (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991). £40.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 29 (4):566.score: 36.0
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  10. L. J. Schneiderman (1995). Wrong Medicine: Doctors, Patients, and Futile Treatment. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 27.0
    In Wrong Medicine, Lawrence J. Schneiderman, M.D., and Nancy S. Jecker, Ph.D., address issues that have occupied the media and the courts since the time of Karen Ann Quinlan. The authors examine the ethics of cases in which medical treatment is offered--or mandated--even if a patient lacks the capacity to appreciate its benefit or if the treatment will still leave a patient totally dependent on intensive medical care. In exploring these timely issues Schneiderman and Jecker reexamine the doctor-patient relationship (...)
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  11. Catherine Belling (2010). The Living Dead Fiction, Horror, and Bioethics. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (3):439-451.score: 27.0
    The victim’s upper brain is destroyed. He’s a living corpse, but his organs are alive and warm and happy until they can be taken out by the butchers at the Institute. Karen Ann Quinlan wasn’t dead. But, terrifyingly, she wasn’t fully alive, either. Maybe she was no longer human. A smear like “death panels” emerges and catches fire because it’s fundamentally interesting. You could write a great thriller . . . about death panels. As I write, a single phrase (...)
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  12. Brad F. Mellon (2007). Learning to Cope with Ambiguity. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):291-297.score: 27.0
    The present study, “Learning to Cope With Ambiguity: Reflections on the Terri Schiavo Case” looks at the many complexities of dealing with Persistent Vegetative State (PVS). By its very nature PVS is ambiguous. It is difficult to diagnose and, even when the diagnosis appears to be certain, there is a multiplicity of ethical issues and treatment options to consider. There are four high profile PVS court cases that can help us understand the Schiavo situation. They are Karen Ann Quinlan, (...)
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  13. Susan Orpett Long (2001). Ancestors, Computers, and Other Mixed Messages: Ambiguity and Euthanasia in Japan. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):62-71.score: 27.0
    Ethical questions about end-of-life treatment present themselves at two levels. In clinical situations, patients, families, and healthcare workers sift through ambivalent feelings and conflicting values as they try to resolve questions in particular circumstances. In a very different way, at the societal level, policy makers, lawyers, and bioethicists attempt to determine the best policies and laws to regulate practices about which there are a variety of deeply held beliefs. In the United States we have tried a number of ways to (...)
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  14. Jeanne Fitzpatrick (2010). A Better Way of Dying: How to Make the Best Choices at the End of Life. Penguin Books.score: 27.0
    Foreword -- Prologue -- Attorney Eileen Fitzpatrick -- Dr. Jeanne Fitzpatrick -- section 1. Death and dying in America -- 1. The need for change : the cautionary tale of Phyllis Shattuck -- Dr. Fitzpatrick tells Phyllis Shattuck's story -- Reflections -- How this book will help -- Lessons to learn -- New name, old concept -- 2. Your right to die -- Your right to die is born : the case of Karen Ann Quinlan -- The Supreme Court (...)
     
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  15. Bonnie Steinbock & Alastair Norcross (eds.) (1994). Killing and Letting Die. Fordham University Press.score: 24.0
    This collection contains twenty-one thought-provoking essays on the controversies surrounding the moral and legal distinctions between euthanasia and "letting die." Since public awareness of this issue has increased this second edition includes nine entirely new essays which bring the treatment of the subject up-to-date. The urgency of this issue can be gauged in recent developments such as the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in the Netherlands, "how-to" manuals topping the bestseller charts in the United States, and the many headlines devoted to (...)
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  16. Carla Mazzio & Douglas Trevor (eds.) (2000). Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Did people in early modern Europe have a concept of an inner self? Carla Mazzio and Douglas Trevor have brought together an outstanding group of literary, cultural, and history scholars to answer this intriguing question. Through a synthesis of historicism and psychoanalytic criticism, the contributors explore the complicated, nuanced, and often surprising union of history and subjectivity in Europe centuries before psychoanalytic theory. Addressing such topics as "fetishes and Renaissances," "the cartographic unconscious," and "the topographic imaginary," these essays move beyond (...)
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  17. María G. Navarro (2011). Review of 'The Great Ocean of Knowledge. The Influence of Travel Literature on the Work of John Locke' by Ann Talbot. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 69 (3&4):162-164.score: 24.0
    The resercher Ann Talbot presents in this book one of the more complex and in-depth studies ever written about the influence of travel literature on the work of the British philospher John Locke (1632-1704). At the end of the 18th century the study of travel literature was an alternative to academic studies. The philosopher John Locke recommended with enthousiasm these books as a way to comprehend human understanding. Several members of the Royal Society like John Harris (1966-1719) affirmed that the (...)
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  18. Maureen Mccormack, Ann L. Mullen, Celeste M. Brody, Karen S. Vocke, Sylvia Norris Jones & Jennifer L. Engle (2010). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 29 (4):434-458.score: 24.0
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  19. Lynn Ann Watson, Dorthe Berntsen, Willem Kuyken & Ed R. Watkins (2012). The Characteristics of Involuntary and Voluntary Autobiographical Memories in Depressed and Never Depressed Individuals. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1382-1392.score: 24.0
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  20. Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman (1999). Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 24.0
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  21. Karen L. Baird, María Julia Bertomeu, Martha Chinouya, Donna L. Dickenson, Michele Harvey-Blankenship, Barbara Ann Hocking, Laura Duhan Kaplan, Jing-Bao Nie, Eileen O'Keefe, Julia Tao Lai Po-wah, Carol Quinn, Arleen L. F. Salles, K. Shanthi, Susana E. Sommer, Rosemarie Tong & Julie Zilberberg (2004). Linking Visions: Feminist Bioethics, Human Rights, and the Developing World. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 24.0
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  22. Janice Ann Beran, Robert Paul Craig, Paul-Albert Emoungu, Lois M. R. Louden, Arthur Sandeen, George L. Dowd, Joellen Watson, Robert R. Sherman, Lorraine Harner, Natalie A. Naylor, Bruce Vaughn, E. V. Johanningmeier, William E. Eaton & Francesco Cordasco (2009). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 9 (1):61-89.score: 24.0
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  23. W. Michael Hoffman, Ann Lange, Jennifer Mills Moore, Karen Donovan, Paulette Mungillo, Aileene McDonagh, Paula Vanetti & Linda Ledoux (1986). Are Corporations Institutionalizing Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 5 (2).score: 24.0
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  24. Aaron S. Kesselheim, Martin T. November, Karen L. Lifford, Thomas F. McElrath, Ann L. Puopolo, E. John Orav & David M. Studdert (2010). Using Malpractice Claims to Identify Risk Factors for Neurological Impairment Among Infants Following Non‐Reassuring Fetal Heart Rate Patterns During Labour. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):476-483.score: 24.0
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  25. Lenore Langsdorf, Stephen H. Watson & Karen A. Smith (eds.) (1998). Reinterpreting the Political: Continental Philosophy and Political Theory. State University of New York Press.score: 24.0
    Rereads classical figures in continental thought, takes up current topics in the legacy of political theory, and analyzes and evaluates Foucault's work as a prime manifestation of the complicated modern interface between truth and power, institution and liberation.
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  26. Studs Terkel (2001). Will the Circle Be Unbroken?: Reflections on Death, Rebirth, and Hunger for a Faith. Distributed by W.W. Norton.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I -- Doctors -- Dr. Joseph Messer -- Dr. Sharon Sandell -- ER -- Dr. John Barrett -- Marc and Noreen Levison, a paramedic and a nurse -- Lloyd (Pete) Haywood, a former gangbanger -- Claire Hellstern, a nurse -- Ed Reardon, a paramedic -- Law and Order -- Robert Soreghan, a homicide detective -- Delbert Lee Tibbs, a former death-row inmate -- War -- Dr. Frank Raila -- Haskell Wexler, a cinematographer -- Tammy Snider, (...)
     
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  27. Annette Watson & Karen E. Till (2010). Ethnography and Participant Observation. In Dydia DeLyser (ed.), The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Geography. Sage. 121--137.score: 24.0
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  28. Anne Sheppard (1994). Phantasia Gerard Watson: Phantasia in Classical Thought. Pp. Xiii + 176. Galway: Galway University Press, 1988. £14.95. The Classical Review 44 (01):79-81.score: 22.0
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  29. John Watson (ed.) (1922/1971). Philosophical Essays, Presented to John Watson. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 21.0
    A school of idealism: meditatio laici, by J. Cappon.--Beati possidentes, by R. M. Wenley.--Moral validity: a study in Platonism, by R. C. Lodge.--Plato and the poet's eidōla, by A. S. Ferguson.--Some reflections on Aristotle's theory of tragedy, by G. S. Brett.--The function of the phantasm in St. Thomas Aquinas, by H. Carr.--The development of the psychology of Maine de Biran, by N. J. Symons.--A plea for eclecticism, by H. W. Wright.--Some present-day tendencies in philosophy, by J. M. MacEachran.--Evolution and personality, (...)
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  30. D. N. Byrne (2013). After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson. [REVIEW] Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board.score: 21.0
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  31. Anne Newstead (2005). Compassion, Not Belief. [REVIEW] Quadrant 49 (6):88-89.score: 20.0
    This is a book review of Karen Armstrong's "The Spiral Staircase", the autobiography of a historian of religion. -/- To cite this article: Newstead, Anne. Compassion, Not Belief [Book Review] [online]. Quadrant, Vol. 49, No. 6, June 2005: 88-89. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=203690937218529;res=IELLCC> ISSN: 0033-5002. [cited 06 Dec 12].
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  32. Ann-Louise Shapiro (1997). How Real is the Reality in Documentary Film?Jill Godmilow, in Conversation with Ann-Louise Shapiro. History and Theory 36 (4):80–101.score: 18.0
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  33. David Berman & W. Lyons (2007). The First Modern Battle for Consciousness: J.B. Watson's Rejection of Mental Images. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):4-26.score: 18.0
    This essay investigates the influences that led J.B. Watson to change from being a student in an introspectionist laboratory at Chicago to being the founder of systematic (or radical) behaviourism. Our focus is the crucial period, 1913-1914, when Watson struggled to give a convincing behaviourist account of mental imaging, which he considered to be the greatest obstacle to his behaviourist programme. We discuss in detail the evidence for and against the view that, at least eventually, Watson rejected outright the very (...)
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  34. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1989). Experience and Theory as Determinants of Attitudes Toward Mental Representation: The Case of Knight Dunlap and the Vanishing Images of J.B. Watson. Philosophical Explorations.score: 18.0
    Galton and subsequent investigators find wide divergences in people's subjective reports of mental imagery. Such individual differences might be taken to explain the peculiarly irreconcilable disputes over the nature and cognitive significance of imagery which have periodically broken out among psychologists and philosophers. However, to so explain these disputes is itself to take a substantive and questionable position on the cognitive role of imagery. This article distinguishes three separable issues over which people can be "for" or "against" mental images. Conflation (...)
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  35. Amy L. Goff-Yates (2000). Karen Warren and the Logic of Domination: A Defense. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):169-181.score: 18.0
    Karen Warren claims that there is a “logic of domination” at work in the oppressive conceptual frameworks informing both sexism and naturism. Although her account of the principle of domination as a connection between oppressions has been an influential one in ecofeminist theory, it has been challenged by recent criticism. Both Karen Green and John Andrews maintain that the principle of domination,as Warren articulates it, is ambiguous. The principle, according to Green, admits of two possible readings, each of (...)
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  36. Michael Slote (2011). Reply to Justin D'Arms and Lori Watson. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):148-155.score: 18.0
    Justin D'Arms says that moral disapproval is more closely tied to anger than to the “empathic chill” effect I emphasized in Moral Sentimentalism, but I argue that anger is in several ways inappropriate or unsatisfactory as a basis for understanding disapproval. I go on to explain briefly why I think we need not share D'Arms's worries about the possibility of nonveridical empathy but then focus on what he says about the reference-fixing theory of moral terminology defended in Moral Sentimentalism. I (...)
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  37. Roland C. Clement (1979). Watson's Reciprocity of Rights and Duties. Environmental Ethics 1 (4):353-355.score: 18.0
    Richard A. Watson’s proposal that rights inhere only in those who can perform duties is here objected to as being too intellectualistic. Instead, it is suggested that rights inhere in all those who participate in the process of becoming, as A. N. Whitehead proposed half a century ago. Ecological science lends new support to this view.
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  38. Chris Calvert-Minor (2014). Epistemological Misgivings of Karen Barad's 'Posthumanism'. Human Studies 37 (1):123-137.score: 18.0
    Karen Barad develops a view she calls ‘posthumanism,’ or ‘agential realism,’ where the human is reconfigured away from the central place of explanation, interpretation, intelligibility, and objectivity to make room for the epistemic importance of other material agents. Barad is not alone in this kind of endeavor, but her posthumanism offers a unique epistemological position. Her aim is to take a performative rather than a representationalist approach to analyzing ‘socialnatural’ practices and challenge methodological assumptions that may go unnoticed in (...)
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  39. Margaret J. Osler & Richard A. Watson (2003). Reply by Margaret J. Osler and Richard A. Watson. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):407-407.score: 18.0
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  40. Mary Ann Baily & Thomas H. Murray (2009). Mary Ann Baily and Thomas H. Murray Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (1):7-7.score: 18.0
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  41. Maria T. Wowk & Andrew P. Carlin (2004). Depicting a Liminal Position in Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis and Membership Categorization Analysis: The Work of Rod Watson. Human Studies 27 (1):69-89.score: 18.0
    This paper provides a provisional examination of Rod Watson''s work and contributions to EM/CA/MCA, in part through a critique of misrepresentations of his arguments in secondary accounts of his work. The form of these misrepresentations includes adumbration and traducement of his arguments. Focusing on the reflexivity of category and sequence and turn-generated categories, we suggest that his analytic position within ethnomethodological fields is unique and remarkable, yet largely unacknowledged. We argue that a re-examination of the body of Watson''s (...)
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  42. Ann Cavoukian (2010). Privacy by Design: The Definitive Workshop. A Foreword by Ann Cavoukian, Ph.D. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):247-251.score: 18.0
    In November, 2009, a prominent group of privacy professionals, business leaders, information technology specialists, and academics gathered in Madrid to discuss how the next set of threats to privacy could best be addressed.The event, Privacy by Design: The Definitive Workshop, was co-hosted by my office and that of the Israeli Law, Information and Technology Authority. It marked the latest step in a journey that I began in the 1990’s, when I first focused on enlisting the support of technologies that could (...)
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  43. Alan Costall (2004). From Darwin to Watson (and Cognitivism) and Back Again: The Principle of Animal-Environment Mutuality. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (1):179 - 195.score: 18.0
    Modern cognitive psychology presents itself as the revolutionary alternative to behaviorism, yet there are blatant continuities between modern cognitivism and the mechanistic kind of behaviorism that cognitivists have in mind, such as their commitment to methodological behaviorism, the stimulus–response schema, and the hypothetico-deductive method. Both mechanistic behaviorism and cognitive behaviorism remain trapped within the dualisms created by the traditional ontology of physical science—dualisms that, one way or another, exclude us from the "physical world." Darwinian theory, however, put us back into (...)
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  44. Erinn Gilson (2013). Review Essay: Ann Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):173-182.score: 18.0
    Review essay of Ann V. Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary.
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  45. T. C. Meyering (1997). Representation and Resemblance: A Review Essay of Richard A. Watson's Representational Ideas. From Plato to Patricia Churchland. Philosophical Psychology 10 (2):221 – 230.score: 18.0
    Are experience and stimulus necessarily alike? Wertheimer spoke of this as an “insidious and insistent belief”. By contrast, Watson devotes an entire book to the defense of the thesis that representation necessarily requires resemblance. I argue that this bold and important thesis is ambiguous between a historical and a systematic reading, and that in either one of these readings the thesis, for different reasons, will be found wanting. Second, a proper evaluation of it in either one of its possible interpretations (...)
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  46. Karen Slattery (1994). Journalism as a Community Enterprise: A Book Review by Karen Slattery. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (3):186 – 189.score: 18.0
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  47. Sabina Leonelli (2012). Karen-Sue Taussig: Ordinary Genomes: Science, Citizenship and Genetic Identities. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):319-322.score: 18.0
    Karen-Sue Taussig: Ordinary Genomes: Science, Citizenship and Genetic Identities Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10441-012-9150-8 Authors Sabina Leonelli, Department of Sociology and Philosophy, ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, UK Journal Acta Biotheoretica Online ISSN 1572-8358 Print ISSN 0001-5342.
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  48. Arthur James Balfour (1881). Professor Watson on Transcendentalism. Mind 6 (22):260-266.score: 18.0
    Balfour replies to criticisms by Watson regarding Balfour's earlier book, A Defense of Philosophical Doubt.
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  49. Patricia Ann Easton (1999). Man Machine and Other Writings Julien Offray De La Mettrie Ann Thomson, Translator and Editor New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xxx + 179 Pp., $54.95, $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):627-.score: 18.0
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  50. Anna Mudde (2008). Karen Barad's Agential Realism and Reflexive Epistemic Authority. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 25:65-75.score: 18.0
    Feminist and post-colonial epistemologists, philosophers of science, and thinkers more generally may find themselves in a distinct form of difficult situation regarding their access to and authority over knowledge within the academic world. Because feminist and post-colonial approaches to knowledge require an acute awareness of relations of domination and the ways in which these pervade the social and epistemic world, it is often difficult to know how to proceed in making theory. These theorists are in particularly ripe positions to benefit (...)
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