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Profile: Karen Green (Monash University)
Profile: Karen Anne Hamnet Green (Monash University)
  1. Karen Green (2013). Introduction: Dummett's Legacy. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 32 (1):5-31.
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  2. Karen Green (2013). Women's Writing and the Early Modern Genre Wars. Hypatia 28 (3):499-515.
    This paper explores two phases of the early modern genre wars. The first was fought by Marie de Gournay, in her “Preface” to Montaigne's Essays, on behalf of her adoptive father and in defense of his naked and masculine prose. The second was fought half a century later by Nicholas Boileau in opposition to Gournay's feminizing successor, Madeleine de Scudéry. In this debate Gournay's position is egalitarian, whereas Scudéry's approximates to a feminism of difference. It is claimed that both female (...)
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  3. Karen Green & Shannon Weekes (2013). Catharine Macaulay on the Will. History of European Ideas 39 (3):409-425.
  4. Karen Green (2012). Catharine Macaulay. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. Karen Green (2012). In Memoriam: Michael Dummett. The Philosophers' Magazine 57:9-10.
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  6. Karen Green (2012). Liberty and Virtue in Catherine Macaulay's Enlightenment Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):411-426.
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  7. Karen Green (2012). Margolis, An Introduction to Christine de Pizan. (New Perspectives on Medieval Literature: Authors and Traditions.) Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2011. Pp. Xxiii, 272. $69.95. ISBN: 9780813036502. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1227-1228.
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  8. John Bigelow, Raymond D. Bradley, Andrew Brennan, Tony Coady, Peter Forrest, James Franklin, Karen Green, Russell Grigg, Matthew Sharpe, Jeanette Kennett, Neil Levy, Catriona Mackenzie, Gary Malinas, Chris Mortensen, Robert Nola, Paul Patton, Charles R. Pidgen, Val Plumwood, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, Jack Reynolds, Paul Thom & Michelle Boulous Walker (2011). The Antipodean Philosopher: Public Lectures on Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Lexington Books.
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  9. Karen Green (2011). From Le Miroir des Dames to Le Livre des Trois Vertus. In Karen Green & Mews Constant J. (eds.), Virtue Ethics for Women 1250-1550. Springer.
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  10. Karen Green (2011). Isolated Individual or Member of a Feminine Courtly Community? Christine de Pizan’s Milieu. In Constant J. Mews & Crossley John (eds.), Communities of Learning: Networks and the Shaping of Intellectual Identity in Europe 1100-1500. Brepols.
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  11. Karen Green (2011). Will the Real Enlightenment Historian Please Stand Up? Catharine Macaulay Versus David Hume. In Stephen Buckle Craig Taylor (ed.), Hume and the Enlightenment. Pickering & Chatto.
    Argues that on an interpretation of the Enlightenment which emphasises its radical potential and importance for the development of democracy Catharine Macaulay should be recognised as a more centrally Enlightenment historian than David Hume.
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  12. Karen Green & Mews Constant J. (2011). Virtue Ethics for Women 1250-1500. Springer.
    This book locates Christine de Pizan's argument that women are virtuous members of the political community within the context of earlier discussions of the relative virtues of men and women.
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  13. Karen Green & Mews Constant J. (eds.) (2011). Virtue Ethics for Women 1250-1550. Springer.
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  14. Karen Green (2010). Canon Fodder. Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):349-355.
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  15. Karen Green (2010). What Were the Ladies in the City of Ladies Reading? The Libraries of Christine de Pizan’s Contemporaries. Medievalia Et Humanistica 36:77-100.
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  16. Karen Green & Nicholas Roffey (2010). Women, Hegel, and Recognition in The Second Sex. Hypatia 25 (2):376 - 393.
    This paper develops a new account of Beauvoir's "Hegelianism" and argues that the strand of contemporary interpretation of Beauvoir that seeks to represent her thought in isolation from that of Jean-Paul Sartre constitutes a betrayal of the philosophy of recognition that she denves from Hegel. It underscores the extent to which Beauvoir influenced Sartre's Being and Nothingness and shows that Sartre and Beauvoir both adapted Hegel's ideas and agreed in rejecting his optimism.
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  17. Joseph A. Bracken, Jacqueline Broad, Karen Green, Kristina Camilleri, Pheng Cheah & Suzanne Guerlac (2009). Baker, Robert B., and Laurence B. McCullough, Editors. The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. Xxviii+ 876. Cloth, $250.00. Bayer, Thora Ilin, and Donald Phillip Verene, Editors. Giambattista Vico: Keys to the New Science: Translations, Commentaries, and Essays. Ithaca-London: Cornell University Press, 2009. Pp. Xi+ 209. Paper, $17.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):483-86.
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  18. Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (2009). A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400-1700. Cambridge University Press.
  19. Karen Green (2009). Madeleine de Scudéry on Love and the Emergence of the "Private Sphere&Quot;. History of Political Thought 30 (2):272-85.
    Madeleine de Scudery played a previously unrecognized part in the development of modern ideas of married friendship, and the eighteenth-century version of the distinction between the public and private spheres, through the influence of her novels on the political views of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Her development of the notions of tender friendship and tender love between the sexes helped change the way in which married love was conceptualized. She transformed the chivalric idea that women rule men through love, by making it (...)
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  20. Karen Green (2009). Necessitating Nominalism. Acta Analytica 24 (3):193-196.
    It is argued that, if Armstrong is correct and truthmakers necessitate the truths they make true, then the truthmakers must include facts about the meanings of the words used to express those truths, and nominalism apparently results. This conclusion, no doubt unpalatable to Armstrong, is, it is claimed, the result of his having failed to distinguish sufficiently the meanings of words and the properties of things.
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  21. Karen Green (2008). Val Plumwood. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):343 – 344.
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  22. Karen Green (2006). A Pinch of Salt for Frege. Synthese 150 (2):209 - 228.
    Michael Dummett has argued that a formal semantics for our language is inadequate unless it can be shown to illuminate to our actual practice of speaking and understanding. This paper argues that Frege’s account of the semantics of predicate expressions according to which the reference of a predicate is a concept (a function from objects to truth values) has exactly the required characteristics. The first part of the paper develops a model for understanding the distinction between objects and concepts as (...)
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  23. Karen Green (2006). Parity and Procedural Justice. Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):4.
  24. Karen Green (2005). The Context Principle and Dummett's Argument for Anti-Realism. Theoria 71 (2):92-117.
  25. Karen Green (2004). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 19 (3):221-225.
  26. Karen Green (2003). Distance, Divided Responsibility and Universalizability. The Monist 86 (3):501-515.
    Peter Singer is responsible for having developed a powerful argument that apparently shows that most of us are far more immoral than we take ourselves to be. Many people follow a minimalist morality. They avoid killing, stealing, lying and cruelty, but feel no obligation to devote themselves to the well-being of everybody else. If we are unstintingly generous, constantly kind or untiring advocates for the prevention of cruelty, we take it that we are doing more morally than is strictly required. (...)
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  27. Karen Green (2003). Sister Prudence Allen, The Concept of Woman, Vol. II. The Early Humanist Reformation 1250-1500 Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (5):313-316.
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  28. Karen Green (2002). Brooke A. Ackerly, Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (1):1-3.
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  29. Karen Green (2002). The Other as Another Other. Hypatia 17 (4):1-15.
    : De Beauvoir and Irigaray are archetypes of two opposed feminisms: egalitarian feminism and radical feminism of difference. Yet a filiation exists between de Beauvoir's claim, that women is Other, and Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman. This paper explores the relationship between de Beauvoir's and Irigaray's notion of otherness. It argues that Irigaray deforms de Beauvoir's categories, and that de Beauvoir provides a more coherent prospect for the development of an authentic feminine subjectivity.
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  30. Karen Green (2001). Analysing Analytic Philosophy: The Rise of Analytic Philosophy. Philosophia 28 (1-4):511-529.
  31. Karen Green (2001). Davidson's Derangement: Of the Conceptual Priority of Language. Dialectica 55 (3):239-258.
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  32. Karen Green (2001). Dummett: Philosophy of Language. Polity Press.
    Dummett's output has been prolific and highly influential, but not always as accessible as it deserves to be. This book sets out to rectify this situation.
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  33. Karen Green (2001). Living Philosophers. Philosophy Now 34:49-49.
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  34. Karen Green (2000). Elizabeth Fallaize, Ed., Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (1):21-26.
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  35. Karen Green (2000). Jo-Anne Pilardi, Simone de Beauvoir Writing the Self: Philosophy Becomes Autobiography Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (1):21-26.
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  36. Karen Green (2000). Margaret Simons, Beauvoir and the Second Sex: Feminism, Race and the Origins of Existentialism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (1):21-26.
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  37. Karen Green (2000). Objective Prescriptions. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (4):512-513.
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  38. Karen Green (1999). A Plague on Both Your Houses. The Monist 82 (2):278-303.
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  39. Karen Green (1999). Engaging with Irigaray. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):118-120.
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  40. Karen Green (1999). Was Wittgenstein Frege's Heir? Philosophical Quarterly 50 (196):289-308.
    This paper argues that Dummett’s interpretation of the relationship between Frege’s anti-psychologism and Wittgenstein’s doctrine that meaning is use results in a misreading of Frege. It points out that anti-mentalism is a form of anti-psychologism, but that mentalism is not the only version of psycholgism. Thus, while Frege and Wittgenstein are united in their opposition to mentalism, they are not equally opposed to psychologism, and from Frege’s point of view, the doctrine that meaning is use could also imply a version (...)
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  41. Karen Green (1998). Michael Beaney, Ed., The Frege Reader Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (4):238-239.
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  42. Karen Green (1998). Was Searle's Descriptivism Refuted? Teorema 17 (1):109-13.
    It is generally thought that <span class='Hi'>Searle</span>'s cluster theory of the sense of a proper name was soundly refuted by Kripke in Naming and Necessity. This paper challenges this widespread belief and argues that the observations made by Kripke do not show that <span class='Hi'>Searle</span>'s version of descriptivism is false. Indeed, charitably interpreted, <span class='Hi'>Searle</span>'s theory retains considerable plausibility.
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  43. Karen Green & John Bigelow (1998). Does Science Persecute Women? The Case of the 16th–17th Century Witch-Hunts. Philosophy 73 (2):195-217.
    I. Logic, rationality and ideology Herbert Marcuse once claimed that the ‘“rational” is a mode of thought and action which is geared to reduce ignorance, destruction, brutality, and oppression.’ He echoed a widespread folk belief that a world in which people were rational would be a better world. This could be taken as an optimistic empirical conjecture: if people were more rational then probably the world would be a better place (a trust that ‘virtue will be rewarded’, so to speak). (...)
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  44. Karen Green (1997). For Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 12 (4).
  45. Karen Green (1997). The Passions and the Imagination in Wollstonecraft's Theory of Moral Judgement. Utilitas 9 (03):271-.
    According to Wollstonecraft . This suggests that for her ethical judgement is based on reason, and so she is an ethical cognitivist. This impression is upheld by the fact that she clearly believes in the existence of ethical truth and has little sympathy with subjectivism. At the same time, she places a great deal of importance on the role of the emotions in ethical judgement. This raises the question how the emotions can be relevant if ethics consists in a realm (...)
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  46. Karen Green (1996). Rousseau's Women. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (1):87 – 109.
    Abstract Feminists have interpreted Rousseau's attitudes to women as characteristic of a patriarchal ideology in which passion, nature and love are associated with the feminine and repressed in favour of masculine reason, culture and justice. Yet this reading does not cohere with Rousseau's adulation of nature, nor with the repression of writing and culture in favour of natural speech which Derrida finds in his texts. This paper uses Rousseau's accounts of his personal experiences to resolve this conflict and to develop (...)
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  47. Karen Green (1996). Two Distinctions in Environmental Goodness. Environmental Values 5 (1):31 - 46.
    In her paper, 'Two distinctions in goodness', Korsgaard points out that while a contrast is often drawn between intrinsic and instrumental value there are really two distinctions to be drawn here. One is the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic value, the other is that between having value as an end and having value as a means. In this paper I apply this contrast to some issues in environmental philosophy. It has become a commonplace of environmentalism that there are intrinsic values (...)
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  48. Karen Green (1995). Marilyn Friedman and Jan Narveson, Political Correctness: For and Against Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (4):241-243.
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  49. Karen Green (1995). The Woman of Reason: Feminism, Humanism, and Political Thought. Polity/Continuum.
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