Search results for 'Karen I. Burke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edmund Burke (1991). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Part I. The Revolutionary War, 1794-1797; Part Ii. Ireland. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume of Burke's writings and speeches is divided into two parts. The first covers the period between the time of his retirement from the House of Commons in 1794 and his death in 1797. His main preoccupation during this period was, of course, the French Revolution and the progress of the war against France. Surveying developments with dismay and apprehension, he produced a critique of the Revolution which expressed much of his mature thinking on political and social life, (...)
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  2.  5
    Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. I. (Of 12).
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  3.  34
    Luce Irigaray & Karen I. Burke (2007). Beyond Totem and Idol, the Sexuate Other. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):353-364.
    The author interprets idolatry, totemism, sacrilege and taboo through her theory of sexual difference and her study of Eastern spirituality. She argues that the taboo on spirituality in Western culture has cancelled difference, resulting in our current forms of idolatry. Preserving difference, however, would allow the transcendence of the human other to exist. The task of learning to respect difference is central to human spirituality and spiritual progression. The article is a translation of “La transcendance de l’autre” in Autour d’idôlatrie: (...)
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  4.  17
    Karen I. Burke (2007). On Bullshit , by Harry G. Frankfurt. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):223-226.
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  5.  28
    Tom Burke (2009). Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part I. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):27-44.
    This is the first of two papers addressing Browning’s “Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey’s Logic” (2002) where he distinguishes a series of pre-theoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The second of these two papers will recommend a modified version of this scheme of stages of inquiry into inquiry. The present paper recounts Browning’s original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning’s claim that in Burke 1994 (...)
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  6.  12
    Patrick Burke (1999). Le pouvoir moral du visage de I'enfant (résumé). Chiasmi International 1:151-151.
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    T. E. Burke (1980). Buber on I—Thou and Religious Belief. Sophia 19 (3):45-55.
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  8. James F. Burke (1990). Escorial Bible I.J.4,2.Oliver H. Hauptmann Mark G. Littlefield. Speculum 65 (3):686-688.
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  9. Jerry Burke (2007). I Tell You No Lie": Truth Commissions and Narrative. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press
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  10. Michael B. Burke (2004). Dion, Theon, and the Many-Thinkers Problem. Analysis 64 (283):242–250.
    Dion is a full-bodied man. Theon is that part of him which consists of all of him except his left foot. What becomes of Dion and Theon when Dion’s left foot is amputated? Employing the doctrine of sortal essentialism, in Burke 1994 I defended a surprising position last defended by Chrysippus: that Dion survives while the seemingly unscathed Theon perishes. This paper defends that position against objections by Stone, Carter, Olson, and others. Most notably, I offer here a novel, (...)
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  11.  7
    Victoria I. Burke (2000). The Politics of Contradiction: Feminism and the Self. Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.
    The nature of the self is a contested topic among feminists, many of whom deny that the self is a unified entity about which universal claims can be made. "The presumed universality and unity of the subject of feminism is effectively undermined by the constraints of the representational discourse in which it functions," writes Judith Butler in a book which aims at complicating the category of the female subject. The perspectives of Third World women have also fostered the view that (...)
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  12.  15
    Victoria I. Burke (2007). Essence Today: Hegel and the Economics of Identity Politics. Philosophy Today 51 (1):79-90.
    The concept of essence is thought by many political theorists to be a residue of the patriarchal onto-theological tradition of metaphysics that needs to be (or has been) overcome by more progressive aims. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of essentialism in light of the treatment of the concept of essence in Hegel’s Science of Logic, and within the context of recent issues in critical race theory and feminism. I will argue that the role of an (...)
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    Victoria I. Burke (2011). Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept. Idealistic Studies 1 (3):161-166.
    A lexical unit of meaning, or the concept, involves not just two moments, the rule and the following of the rule, but two reciprocally dependent moments. I argue that this links meaning to value. As a reciprocal relation, truth as normative is constituted by what Hegel calls ethical substance, which exists only between more than one consciousness, or, as Hegel would say, moments of consciousness. I read these two moments as the two shapes of consciousness that Hegel calls the master (...)
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  14.  32
    Victoria I. Burke (2005). Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination. Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental independence from others. The formative activity (...)
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  15.  28
    Victoria I. Burke (1999). Antigone's Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human. Dialogue 38 (03):535-.
    I maintain that Hegel’s reading of the Antigone underestimates the power of the negativity to which Antigone’s action is dedicated. I argue that the negativity of death and the sacred cannot, contrary to Hegel, to be sublated and thus incorporated into the progression of Spirit. Bataille’s treatment of the sacred better characterizes the unworldly force and the otherness with which Antigone and Creon are confronted when their actions bring the divine and the human into conflict. Antigone’s obedience to what she (...)
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  16.  3
    Carolyn Burke (1982). Gertrude Stein, the Cone Sisters, and the Puzzle of Female Friendship. Critical Inquiry 8 (3):543-564.
    For ten years, between 1903 and 1913, Gertrude Stein saw human relationships as painful mathematical puzzles in need of solutions. Again and again, she converted the predicaments of her personal life into literary material, the better to solve and to exorcise them. The revelation that relationships had a structural quality came to her during the composition of Q.E.D. , when she grasped the almost mathematical nature of her characters' emotional impasse. Stein's persona in the novel comments on their triangular affair, (...)
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  17. Kenneth Burke (1978). Methodological Repression and/or Strategies of Containment. Critical Inquiry 5 (2):401-416.
    Fredric Jameson's exacting essay, "The Symbolic Interference; or, Kenneth Burke and Ideological Analysis" Critical Inquiry 4 [Spring 1978]: 507-23) moves me to comment. I shall apply one of my charges of my title to him, he applies the other to me. The matter is further complicated by the fact that there is a distance at which they are hard to tell apart. For any expression of something implies a repression of something else, and any statement that goes only so (...)
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  18.  2
    Kenneth Burke (1974). Dancing with Tears in My Eyes. Critical Inquiry 1 (1):23-31.
    Booth says, "Burke seems to be claiming to know better than Keats himself some of what the poem 'means', and the meaning he finds is antithetical not just to the poet's intentions but to any intentions he might conceivably have entertained!" The notion underlying my analysis is this: Formal social norms of "propriety" are related to poetic "propriety" as Emily Post's Book of Etiquette is to the depths of what goes on in the poet's search "for what feels just (...)
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  19.  1
    Kenneth Burke (1977). Post-Poesque Derivation of a Terministic Cluster. Critical Inquiry 4 (2):214-220.
    Underlying these pages is the assumption that, since we begin life as speechless bodies, the radicality of religious and poetic utterance somehow retains its relation to these origins, though in maturing we develop far from the order of reality we began with. Such expression must be rooted in man's primal essence as a speechless body, albeit there develops the technical "grace" of language . I take it that the body, as a physiological organism, is always behaving in the "specious present." (...)
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  20. Victoria I. Burke (2010). Hegel, Antigone, and First-Person Authority. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):373-380.
    Hegel thought Sophocles' Antigone was the finest tragedy, and he put drama atop his hierarchy of the arts, precisely at the point where his system transitions from aesthetics to the philosophy of religion. Hegel concluded his Aesthetics by writing, "Of all the masterpieces of the classical and modern world, the Antigone seems to me to be the most magnificent and satisfying work of art."1The Antigone owes its place in Hegel's hierarchy to its focus on Antigone's uncanny self-certainty. Positioned at the (...)
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  21.  17
    Karen Burke (2011). Audience of the Other. Philosophy Today 55 (1):50-63.
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    Victoria I. Burke (1997). Recent Dissertations. The Owl of Minerva 29 (1):237-238.
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  23.  1
    Victoria I. Burke (2000). The Politics of Contradiction. Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.
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  24. Victoria I. Burke (1998). Leslie Hill, Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (5):344-346.
     
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  25. Victoria I. Burke (1997). Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (6):409-411.
  26.  4
    Victoria I. Burke (2013). The Politics of Contradiction. Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.
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    Karen C. Burke & Grayson M. P. McCouch, Social Security Reform: Lessons From Private Pensions.
    Widespread concerns about the long-term fiscal gap in Social Security have prompted various proposals for structural reform, with individual accounts as the centerpiece. Carving out individual accounts from the existing system would shift significant risks and responsibilities to individual workers. A parallel development has already occurred in the area of private pensions. Experience with 401 plans indicates that many workers will have difficulty making prudent decisions concerning investment and withdrawal of funds. Moreover, in implementing any system of voluntary individual accounts, (...)
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  28. Edmund Burke & Charles William Wentworth Fitzwilliam Fitzwilliam (1831). A Letter From the Late Right Honourable Edmund Burke to a Noble Lord on the Attacks Made Upon Him and His Pension, in the House of Lords, by the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Lauderdale, 1796. C.J.G. And F. Rivington.
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  29. Victoria I. Burke (1998). Leslie Hill, Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 18:344-346.
     
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  30. C. D. Burke & I. M. Woodward (1969). Pain and Phantom Sensation in Spinal Cord Paralysis. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 26--489.
     
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  31. Kenneth Burke, Herbert W. Simons & Trevor Melia (1989). The Legacy of Kenneth Burke.
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  32. Edmund Burke (1997). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Volume 1 of the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. They demonstrate in a variety of ways how determined he was to become involved in the social and intellectual life of his (...)
     
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  33. Edmund Burke (1978). The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Volume X: Index. University of Chicago Press.
    This, the last volume in the series, provides the keys to all the others. All letters to and from Burke are listed, and the material in the letters themselves analysed in a comprehensive general index.
     
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  34. Edmund Burke (1991). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: India, the Launching of the Hastings Impeachment 1786-1788. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume continues the story of Burke and the affairs of the East India Company which was begun in Volume V. By 1786, Burke had fixed on Warren Hastings as the main culprit for the abuses that seemed to him so glaring. He greeted Hastings's return to Britain with a parliamentary attack which culminated in a trial by impeachment in the House of Lords. This was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his (...)
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  35. Edmund Burke (1996). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Party, Parliament, and the American War 1774-1780. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume of The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke continues the story of Edmund Burke, the Rockingham party in British politics, and the American crisis. By 1774 Burke was already recognized as a master of parliamentary debate and an accomplished writer. By 1780, however, his reputation was to have risen substantially. Probably the most important single reason was his Speech on Conciliation with America, which was presented to the House of Commons in March 1775, published, and (...)
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  36. Edmund Burke (1997). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: The Early Writings. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Volume 1 of the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. They demonstrate in a variety of ways how determined he was to become involved in the social and intellectual life of his (...)
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  37. Edmund Burke (1990). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: The French Revolution 1790-1794. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Edmund Burke was one of the most influential commentators on the events of the French Revolution. This edition throws new light on Burke's motives, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected.
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  38. Edmund Burke (2000). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Volume Vii: India: The Hastings Trial. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear (...)
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  39.  7
    Edmund Burke, Selected Works of Edmund Burke.
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  40.  30
    John P. Burke (1977). Edmund Burke: His Political Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):233-235.
  41.  11
    John P. Burke (1976). The Social Thought of Rousseau and Burke: A Comparative Study. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):370-371.
  42.  12
    Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IX. (Of 12).
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  43.  11
    Edmund Burke, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America.
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  44.  7
    Edmund Burke, Selections From the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke.
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  45.  5
    Kenneth Burke & Margaret Schlauch (1938). Twelve Propositions by Kenneth Burke on the Relation Between Economics and Psychology. Science and Society 2 (2):242 - 253.
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  46. Edmund Burke (1976). Edmund Burke on Government, Politics, and Society. International Publications Service.
  47. Edmund Burke (1968). Edmund Burke on Revolution. New York, Harper & Row.
     
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  48. Edmund Burke (1960). Reflections with Edmund Burke. New York, Vantage Press.
  49. Edmund Burke (1999). The Portable Edmund Burke. Penguin Books.
  50. Edmund Burke (1960). The Philosophy of Edmund Burke. Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press.
     
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