Search results for 'Karen I. Burke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. I. (Of 12).score: 1260.0
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  2. Luce Irigaray & Karen I. Burke (2007). Beyond Totem and Idol, the Sexuate Other. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):353-364.score: 870.0
    The author interprets idolatry, totemism, sacrilege and taboo through her theory of sexual difference and her study of Eastern spirituality. She argues that the taboo on spirituality in Western culture has cancelled difference, resulting in our current forms of idolatry. Preserving difference, however, would allow the transcendence of the human other to exist. The task of learning to respect difference is central to human spirituality and spiritual progression. The article is a translation of “La transcendance de l’autre” in Autour d’idôlatrie: (...)
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  3. Karen I. Burke (2007). On Bullshit , by Harry G. Frankfurt. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):223-226.score: 870.0
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  4. Tom Burke (2009). Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part I. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):27-44.score: 600.0
    This is the first of two papers addressing Browning’s “Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey’s Logic” (2002) where he distinguishes a series of pre-theoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The second of these two papers will recommend a modified version of this scheme of stages of inquiry into inquiry. The present paper recounts Browning’s original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning’s claim that in Burke 1994 (...)
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  5. Patrick Burke (1999). Le pouvoir moral du visage de I'enfant (résumé). Chiasmi International 1:151-151.score: 360.0
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  6. T. E. Burke (1980). Buber on I—Thou and Religious Belief. Sophia 19 (3):45-55.score: 360.0
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  7. Jerry Burke (2007). I Tell You No Lie": Truth Commissions and Narrative. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.score: 360.0
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  8. Tom Burke (2009). Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part 2. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (2):157--176.score: 300.0
    This is the second of two papers addressing Douglas Browning's "Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey�s Logic" (2002) where he distinguishes a series of pretheoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The first paper recounts Browning's original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning's claim that in Burke 1994 I made two such mistakes of not properly distinguishing theoretical and pretheoretical stages of inquiry into inquiry. The second (...)
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  9. Victoria I. Burke (2010). Hegel, Antigone, and First-Person Authority. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):373-380.score: 240.0
    Hegel thought Sophocles' Antigone was the finest tragedy, and he put drama atop his hierarchy of the arts, precisely at the point where his system transitions from aesthetics to the philosophy of religion. Hegel concluded his Aesthetics by writing, "Of all the masterpieces of the classical and modern world, the Antigone seems to me to be the most magnificent and satisfying work of art."1The Antigone owes its place in Hegel's hierarchy to its focus on Antigone's uncanny self-certainty. Positioned at the (...)
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  10. Victoria I. Burke (1999). Antigone's Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human. Dialogue 38 (03):535-.score: 240.0
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  11. Karen C. Burke & Grayson M. P. McCouch, Social Security Reform: Lessons From Private Pensions.score: 240.0
    Widespread concerns about the long-term fiscal gap in Social Security have prompted various proposals for structural reform, with individual accounts as the centerpiece. Carving out individual accounts from the existing system would shift significant risks and responsibilities to individual workers. A parallel development has already occurred in the area of private pensions. Experience with 401(k) plans indicates that many workers will have difficulty making prudent decisions concerning investment and withdrawal (...)
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  12. Victoria I. Burke (2011). Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept. Idealistic Studies 1 (3):161-166.score: 240.0
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  13. Victoria I. Burke (1998). Leslie Hill, Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (5):344-346.score: 240.0
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  14. Victoria I. Burke (2007). Essence Today. Philosophy Today 51 (1):79-90.score: 240.0
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  15. Victoria I. Burke (1997). Recent Dissertations. The Owl of Minerva 29 (1):237-238.score: 240.0
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  16. Victoria I. Burke (2013). The Politics of Contradiction. Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.score: 240.0
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  17. W. E. Riebsame, W. J. Parton, K. A. Galvin, I. C. Burke, L. Bohren, R. Young & E. Knop (1994). Integrated Modeling of Land Use and Cover Change. BioScience 44 (5):350-356.score: 240.0
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  18. Karen Burke (2011). Audience of the Other. Philosophy Today 55 (1):50-63.score: 240.0
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  19. C. D. Burke & I. M. Woodward (1969). Pain and Phantom Sensation in Spinal Cord Paralysis. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 26--489.score: 240.0
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  20. I. C. Burke, T. G. F. Kittel, W. K. Lauenroth, P. Snook, C. M. Yonker & W. J. Parton (1991). Regional Analysis of the Central Great Plains. BioScience 41 (10):685-692.score: 240.0
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  21. Victoria I. Burke (2000). The Politics of Contradiction: Feminism and the Self. Philosophy Today 44 (1):44-50.score: 240.0
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  22. W. K. Lauenroth, I. C. Burke, David Pimentel, Christa Wilson, Christine McCullum, Rachel Huang, Paulette Dwen, Jessica Flack, Quynh Tran, Tamara Saltman & Barbara Cliff (1998). Separating Feelings From Knowledge. BioScience 48 (5):340-341.score: 240.0
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  23. Adam Grzeliński (2001). Specyfika doświadczenia estetycznego w teoriach Shaftesbury\'ego, Addisona i Burke\'a. Filo-Sofija 1 (1):127-145.score: 140.0
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  24. F. P. Lock (1999). Edmund Burke: Volume I, 1730-1784. Clarendon Press.score: 126.0
    Edmund Burke (1730-1797) was one of the most profound, versatile, and accomplished thinkers of the eighteenth century. Born and educated in Dublin, he moved to London to study law, but remained to make a career in English politics, completing A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757) before entering the political arena. A Member of Parliament for nearly thirty years, his speeches are still read and studied as classics of political thought, and (...)
     
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  25. Stefan Morawski (1971). Światopogląd i estetyka Burke'a. Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 17.score: 126.0
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  26. M. Elizabeth Weiser (2009). “As Usual I Fell on the Bias”: Kenneth Burke's Situated Dialectic. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):pp. 134-153.score: 120.0
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  27. Peter Burke (2007). A Social History of Knowledge Revisited. Modern Intellectual History 4 (3):521-535.score: 120.0
    In contributing to this symposium on book history, I was asked to reflect on my ASocialHistoryofKnowledge (hereafter SHK), which was published in 2000, describing how I came to write it and what has happened to the field since, and considering the question of whether I might write my essay differently if I were beginning it today. Following this, I shall devote the remainder of the article to a sketch for a future project on the history of knowledge.
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  28. T. E. Burke (1974). Can Philosophy Be Original? Inquiry 17 (1-4):193 – 211.score: 120.0
    To what extent does the fact that a philosopher, in order to communicate, is constrained to use the same language and the same concepts as other members of his society, inhibit him from developing genuinely original modes of thought? Section I of this paper outlines arguments for the view that any attempt at radical originality, of the kinds traditionally expected of philosophy, must involve misuse of these shared concepts. Section II, however, on the basis of an examination of what it (...)
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  29. Michael B. Burke (1994). Denying the Antecedent: A Common Fallacy? Informal Logic 16 (1).score: 120.0
    An argumentative passage that might appear to be an instance of denying the antecedent will generally admit of an alternative interpretation, one on which the conditional contained by the passage is a preface to the argument rather than a premise of it. On this interpretation. which generally is a more charitable one, the conditional plays a certain dialectical role and, in some cases, a rhetorical role as welL Assuming only a very weak principle of exigetical charity, I consider what it (...)
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  30. Michael B. Burke (2006). Electronic Media Review. Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):255-260.score: 120.0
    Logic and Proofs, developed at Carnegie Mellon, is the only instructional program that can support a computer-taught course (not justa computer-assisted course) in modern symbolic logic. First I provide a description and an assessment of the program. Then, drawing on my twenty years of experience, initially with Patrick Suppes’ Valid (no longer available), recently with Logic and Proofs, I discuss the very substantial benefits, as well as the challenges to be addressed, when offering symbolic logic via a computer-taught course.
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  31. Weston Jr (1960). Book Review:The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Vol. I. Thomas W. Copeland. [REVIEW] Ethics 70 (3):249-.score: 120.0
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  32. Michael McClain (1992). Why I Don't Like Edmund Burke"; and "A Muslim Version of Chesterton. The Chesterton Review 18 (4):643-643.score: 120.0
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  33. Christopher J. Insole (2008). Two Conceptions of Liberalism: Theology, Creation, and Politics in the Thought of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):447-489.score: 66.0
    Constitutional liberal practices are capable of being normatively grounded by a number of different metaphysical positions. Kant provides one such grounding, in terms of the autonomously derived moral law. I argue that the work of Edmund Burke provides a resource for an alternative construal of constitutional liberalism, compatible with, and illumined by, a broadly Thomistic natural law worldview. I contrast Burke's treatment of the relationship between truth and cognition, prudence and rights, with that of his contemporary, Kant. We (...)
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  34. Bart Vandenabeele (2012). Beauty, Disinterested Pleasure, and Universal Communicability: Kant's Response to Burke. Kant-Studien 103 (2):207-233.score: 66.0
    Although Kant (wrongly) holds that the universal communicability of aesthetic judgments logically follows from the disinterested character of the pleasure upon which they are based, Kant's emphasis on the a priori validity of judgments of beauty can be viewed as a rebuttal of the kind of empiricist arguments that Burke offers to justify the social nature of the experience of beauty. I argue that the requirement of universal communicability is not a mere addition to the requirement of universal validity (...)
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  35. Christian Jecov Schallenmueller (2010). Religião e Revolução nas principais obras de Edmund Burke e Alexis de Tocqueville. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 17:153-171.score: 66.0
    This paper aims at discussing the relations between religion and revolution according to Edmund Burke’s and Alexis de Tocqueville’s considerations on the unleashment of the French Revolution. There is a rare dialog between both authors made by the French thinker, mainly in his book The Old Regime and the Revolution. Nonetheless, I intend to deepen this dialog. This procedure will make it possible to review the comparisons – between the English and the French Revolutions – made by both authors (...)
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  36. Robert E. Watkins (2010). Politics in Medias Res: Power That Precedes and Exceeds in Foucault and Burke. History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):1-19.score: 54.0
    Foucault famously claimed that in political theory the king’s head still needs to be cut off, proclaiming the imperative to move beyond a centralized and prohibitive conception of power and toward a more distributed, relational and productive understanding of power in political society. Ironically, Edmund Burke, famous for criticizing an actual revolutionary regicide in France, can be read as an ally in Foucault’s project of theoretical regicide and conceptual revolution. For although he staunchly defended existing monarchies in France and (...)
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  37. Charles W. Parkin (1956/1968). The Moral Basis of Burke's Political Thought. New York, Russell & Russell.score: 54.0
    The writings on Burke which I have found most useful are the following: J. MacCunn, The Political Philosophy of Burke, 1913. CE Vaughan, Studies in the ...
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  38. Joseph R. Stromberg, Rothbard and Burke Vs. The Cold War Burkeans.score: 54.0
    The monarchic, and aristocratical, and popular partisans have been jointly laying their axes to the root of all government, and have in their turns proved each other absurd and inconvenient. In vain you tell me that artificial government is good, but that I fall out only with the abuse. The thing! the thing itself is the abuse! ~ Edmund Burke, 1756..
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  39. Daniel O'Neill (2009). Rethiking Burke and India. History of Political Thought 30 (3):492-523.score: 54.0
    The question of how to think about the relationship between political theory and empire has recently emerged as an important topic in the history of political thought. In this regard, Edmund Burke, often regarded as the founding father of modern conservatism, has been depicted by a number of contemporary scholars as a staunch anti-imperialist and a strong defender of cultural pluralism and difference. In the present article, I argue against this view in two ways. First, I contend that (...) was not an 'anti- imperial' thinker in the strict sense of that term. The second argument operates within the framework of Burke's commitment to the imperial project -- rightly understood -- and seeks, within that framework, to understand the basis for his criticism of the British Empire in India. This latter analysis comprises the bulk of the paper. Following it, I conclude very briefly by comparing Burke's arguments about empire in India with his arguments about empire in the New World, and suggest that a coherent and consistent Burkean standpoint emerges from such a comparison, albeit one which is deeply conservative, and therefore challenges a good deal of current scholarship on this topic. (shrink)
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  40. Margaret Kohn & Daniel I. O'Neill (2006). A Tale of Two Indias: Burke and Mill on Empire and Slavery in the West Indies and America. Political Theory 34 (2):192 - 228.score: 42.0
    The subject of empire has emerged as a central concern in political theory. Edmund Burke and John Stuart Mill have been at the center of much recent scholarship on this topic. A number of depictions of Burke as a critic and Mill as a defender of empire rely largely on their writings about India. This article focuses instead on Burke and Mill's writings on the West Indies and America from the standpoint of both thinkers' connection to Scottish (...)
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  41. David Mark Kovacs (2010). Is There a Conservative Solution to the Many Thinkers Problem? Ratio 23 (3):275-290.score: 36.0
    On a widely shared assumption, our mental states supervene on our microphysical properties – that is, microphysical supervenience is true. When this thesis is combined with the apparent truism that human persons have proper parts, a grave difficulty arises: what prevents some of these proper parts from being themselves thinkers as well? How can I know that I am a human person and not a smaller thinker enclosed in a human person? Most solutions to this puzzle make radical, if not (...)
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  42. C. E. Emmer (2007). The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch. International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.score: 36.0
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows (...)
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  43. Maria Popczyk (2012). Fear and Anxiety in the Dimensions of Art. ARGUMENT 2 (2):333–346.score: 36.0
    In the paper I am concerned with various manifestations of aesthetic fear and anxiety, that is, fear and anxiety triggered by works of art, which I am discussing from aesthetic as well as anthropological perspectives. I am analysing the link between fear and pleasure in catharsis, in Edmund Burke’s notion of the sublime, and in reference to Goya’s Black Paintings and to Paul Virilio’s thought. Both aesthetic fear and aesthetic anxiety exist alongside other emotions, such as pity and sadness, (...)
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  44. Burke Townsend (1980). Book Review:Perception, Theory and Commitment. The New Philosophy of Science Harold I. Brown. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 47 (3):496-.score: 36.0
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  45. Aleksandar Nikitovic (2003). Traditionalism and Modern Subjectivity: Enlightenment and Conservatism of Edmund Burke. Filozofija I Društvo 22:271-283.score: 36.0
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  46. P. Giordanetti (2005). Moses Mendelssohn: L'Inquiry di Burke. In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led. 50--62.score: 36.0
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  47. Piero Emilio Giordanetti (2005). Edmund Burke: Arte e passioni. In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led.score: 36.0
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  48. P. Giordanetti (2005). Edmund Burke. L'infinità Sublime. In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led. 168--171.score: 36.0
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  49. Dragana Jeremic-Molnar & Aleksandar Molnar (2009). Debate on Sublime in the End of 18th Century: Burke, Kant, Schiller. Filozofija I Društvo 20 (1):143-158.score: 36.0
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