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  1. Karen J. Warren (2011). An Ecofeminist Philosophical Perspective of Anthony Weston's 'The Incompleat Eco-Philosopher'. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):103-111.
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  2. Karen J. Warren (2009). Le pouvoir et la promesse de l'écoféminisme. Multitudes 1 (1):170-176.
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  3. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. Jessica Pierce, Hilde Lindeman Nelson & Karen J. Warren (2002). Feminist Slants on Nature and Health. Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (1):61-72.
    Ecological feminism (or ecofeminism) and feminist bioethics seem to have much in common. They share certain methodological and epistemological concerns, offer similar challenges to traditional philosophy, and take up a number of the same practical issues. The two disciplines have thus far had little or no direct interaction; this is one attempt to begin some conversation and perhaps stimulate some cross-pollination of ideas. The email dialogue engaged an active ecofeminist scholar, Karen Warren, and an active feminist bioethicist, Hilde Nelson, in (...)
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  5. Karen J. Warren (2002). Chinnagounder's Challenge: The Question of Ecological Citizenship. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):99-102.
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  6. Karen J. Warren (2002). Some Ecofeminist Worries About a Distributive Mode. In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. 4--2.
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  7. Karen J. Warren (2001). Limits of Liberalism. The Philosophers' Magazine 16 (16):58-58.
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  8. Karen J. Warren (2001). Nature is a Feminist Issue. The Philosophers' Magazine 14:19-20.
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  9. Karen J. Warren (2000). Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It is and Why It Matters. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  10. Karen J. Warren (1999). Environmental Justice: Some Ecofeminist Worries About a Distributive Model. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):151-161.
    I argue that the framing of environmental justice issues in terms of distribution is problematic. Using insights about the connections between institutions of human oppression and the domination of the natural environment, as well as insights into nondistributive justice, I argue for a nondistributive model to supplement, complement, and in some cases preempt the distributive model. I conclude with a discussion of eight features of such a nondistributive conception of justice.
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  11. Karen J. Warren (1999). Peacemaking and Philosophy: A Critique of Justice for Hero and Now. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (3):411–423.
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  12. An Ecofeminist & Karen J. Warren (1997). Taking Empirical Data Seriously. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 3.
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  13. Charlene Spretnak & Karen J. Warren (1997). Radical Nonduality in Ecofeminist Philosophy. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 425--436.
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  14. Karen J. Warren & Duane L. Cady (eds.) (1996). Bringing Peace Home: Feminism, Violence, and Nature. Indiana University Press.
    "This collection of works is ambitious, well documented, thoroughly—though not turgidly—referenced, and comprehensively indexed.
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  15. Karen J. Warren (ed.) (1994). Ecological Feminism. Routledge.
    This anthology is the first such collection to focus on the exclusively philosophical aspects of ecological feminism. It addresses basic questions about the conceptual underpinnings of `women-nature' connections, and emphasises the importance of seeing sexism and the exploitation of the environment as parallel forms of domination. Ecological Feminism is enriched by the inclusion of essays which take differing views of the importance and nature of ecofeminism. It will be an invaluable resource for courses on women's studies, environmental studies and philosophy.
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  16. Karen J. Warren & Duane L. Cady (1994). Feminism and Peace: Seeing Connections. Hypatia 9 (2):4 - 20.
    In this essay we make visible the contribution of women even and especially when women cannot be added to mainstream, non-feminist accounts of peace. We argue that if feminism is taken seriously, then most philosophical discussions of peace must be updated, expanded and reconceived in ways which centralize feminist insights into the interrelationships among women, nature, peace, and war. We do so by discussing six ways that feminist scholarship informs mainstream philosophical discussions of peace.
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  17. Karen J. Warren & Jim Cheney (1993). Ecosystem Ecology and Metaphysical Ecology: A Case Study. Environmental Ethics 15 (2):99-116.
    We critique the metaphysical ecology developed by J. Baird Callicott in “The Metaphysical Implications of Ecology” in light of what we take to be the most viable attempt to provide an inclusive theoretical framework for the wide variety of extant ecosystem analyses—namely, hierarchy theory. We argue that Callicott’s metaphysical ecology is not consonant with hierarchy theory and is, therefore, an unsatisfactory foundation for the development of an environmental ethic.
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  18. Karen J. Warren (1991). Introduction. Hypatia 6 (1):1-2.
  19. Karen J. Warren & Jim Cheney (1991). Ecological Feminism and Ecosystem Ecology. Hypatia 6 (1):179 - 197.
    Ecological feminism is a feminism which attempts to unite the demands of the women's movement with those of the ecological movement. Ecofeminists often appeal to "ecology" in support of their claims, particularly claims about the importance of feminism to environmentalism. What is missing from the literature is any sustained attempt to show respects in which ecological feminism and the science of ecology are engaged in complementary, mutually supportive projects. In this paper we attempt to do that by showing ten important (...)
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  20. Karen J. Warren & Martin Gunderson (1991). The Feminist Critique of Liberalism. Social Philosophy Today 5:387-410.
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  21. Karen J. Warren (1990). The Power and the Promise of Ecological Feminism. Environmental Ethics 12 (2):125-146.
    Ecological feminism is the position that there are important connections-historical, symbolic, theoretical-between the domination of women and the domination of nonhuman nature. I argue that because the conceptual connections between the dual dominations of women and nature are located in an oppressive patriarchal conceptual framework characterized by a logic of domination, (1) the logic of traditional feminism requires the expansion of feminism to include ecological feminism and (2) ecological feminism provides a framework for developing a distinctively feminist environmental ethic. I (...)
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  22. Karen J. Warren (1988). Critical Thinking and Feminism. Informal Logic 10 (1).
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  23. Karen J. Warren (1987). Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections. Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.
    The current feminist debate over ecology raises important and timely issues about the theoretical adequacy of the four leading versions of feminism-liberal feminism, traditional Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and socialist feminism. In this paper I present a minimal condition account of ecological feminism, or ecofeminism. I argue that if eco-feminism is true or at least plausible, then each of the four leading versions of feminism is inadequate, incomplete, or problematic as a theoretical grounding for eco-feminism. I conclude that, if eco-feminism (...)
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  24. Karen J. Warren (1984). Ethics and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 6 (3):277-282.
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  25. Karen J. Warren (1984). Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 6 (2):175-179.
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