Search results for 'Karen Lock' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Coker, Marianna Thomas, Karen Lock & Robyn Martin (2007). Detention and the Evolving Threat of Tuberculosis: Evidence, Ethics, and Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):609-615.score: 240.0
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  2. F. P. Lock (2009). Edmund Burke, Volume II: 1784-1797. OUP Oxford.score: 40.0
    This is the second and concluding volume of a biography of Edmund Burke (1730-97), a key figure in eighteenth-century British and Irish politics and intellectual life. Covering the most interesting years of his life (1784-97), its leading themes are India and the French Revolution. Burke was largely responsible for the impeachment of Warren Hastings, former Governor-General of Bengal. The lengthy (145-day) trial of Hastings (which lasted from 1788 to 1795) is recognized as a landmark episode in the history of Britain's (...)
     
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  3. Xingxing He, Jun Liu, Yang Xu, Luis Martínez & Da Ruan (2012). On Α-Satisfiability and its Α-Lock Resolution in a Finite Lattice-Valued Propositional Logic. Logic Journal of the Igpl 20 (3):579-588.score: 18.0
    Automated reasoning issues are addressed for a finite lattice-valued propositional logic LnP(X) with truth-values in a finite lattice-valued logical algebraic structure—lattice implication algebra. We investigate extended strategies and rules from classical logic to LnP(X) to simplify the procedure in the semantic level for testing the satisfiability of formulas in LnP(X) at a certain truth-value level α (α-satisfiability) while keeping the role of truth constant formula played in LnP(X). We propose a lock resolution method at a certain truth-value level α (...)
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  4. Amy L. Goff-Yates (2000). Karen Warren and the Logic of Domination: A Defense. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):169-181.score: 12.0
    Karen Warren claims that there is a “logic of domination” at work in the oppressive conceptual frameworks informing both sexism and naturism. Although her account of the principle of domination as a connection between oppressions has been an influential one in ecofeminist theory, it has been challenged by recent criticism. Both Karen Green and John Andrews maintain that the principle of domination,as Warren articulates it, is ambiguous. The principle, according to Green, admits of two possible readings, each of (...)
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  5. Chris Calvert-Minor (2014). Epistemological Misgivings of Karen Barad's 'Posthumanism'. Human Studies 37 (1):123-137.score: 12.0
    Karen Barad develops a view she calls ‘posthumanism,’ or ‘agential realism,’ where the human is reconfigured away from the central place of explanation, interpretation, intelligibility, and objectivity to make room for the epistemic importance of other material agents. Barad is not alone in this kind of endeavor, but her posthumanism offers a unique epistemological position. Her aim is to take a performative rather than a representationalist approach to analyzing ‘socialnatural’ practices and challenge methodological assumptions that may go unnoticed in (...)
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  6. Karen Slattery (1994). Journalism as a Community Enterprise: A Book Review by Karen Slattery. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (3):186 – 189.score: 12.0
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  7. Sabina Leonelli (2012). Karen-Sue Taussig: Ordinary Genomes: Science, Citizenship and Genetic Identities. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):319-322.score: 12.0
    Karen-Sue Taussig: Ordinary Genomes: Science, Citizenship and Genetic Identities Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10441-012-9150-8 Authors Sabina Leonelli, Department of Sociology and Philosophy, ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, UK Journal Acta Biotheoretica Online ISSN 1572-8358 Print ISSN 0001-5342.
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  8. Anna Mudde (2008). Karen Barad's Agential Realism and Reflexive Epistemic Authority. Proceedings of the XXII World Congress of Philosophy 25:65-75.score: 12.0
    Feminist and post-colonial epistemologists, philosophers of science, and thinkers more generally may find themselves in a distinct form of difficult situation regarding their access to and authority over knowledge within the academic world. Because feminist and post-colonial approaches to knowledge require an acute awareness of relations of domination and the ways in which these pervade the social and epistemic world, it is often difficult to know how to proceed in making theory. These theorists are in particularly ripe positions to benefit (...)
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  9. Karen Slattery (1994). Book Review: Journalism as a Community Enterprise: A Book Review by Karen Slattery. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (3):186 – 189.score: 12.0
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  10. Amrit Heer (2014). Karen Houle and Jim Vernon (Eds): Hegel and Deleuze: Together Again for the First Time. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):123-128.score: 12.0
    With this important volume, Karen Houle and Jim Vernon have done a masterful job at assembling a collection of essays on a topic which, until recently, has gone undeservedly neglected in contemporary scholarship—the relationship between German Idealist, G. W. F. Hegel, and twentieth Century French philosopher, Gilles Deleuze. The relationship between these two thinkers has been neglected in favor of Deleuze’s relationship to other historical figures (most importantly Kant), and Hegel’s relationship to other contemporary figures (for example, Derrida). In (...)
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  11. Christine Bard (2003). Karen OFFEN, European Feminisms 1700-1950. A political history, Stanford University Press, 2000, 554 p. Clio 1:22-22.score: 12.0
    Historienne, membre de l'Institute for Research on Women and Gender de Stanford, active au sein de l'International federation for research in women's history, Karen Offen concentre dans ce livre vingt-cinq ans de lectures et de recherches sur l'histoire du féminisme en Europe. Elle tire un grand profit de l'explosion récente des études sur l'histoire du féminisme et des colloques internationaux sur le féminisme en Europe. C'est le genre de livre que l'on lit, crayon à la main, et où l'..
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  12. Janie B. Butts & Karen L. Rich (2008). Comment by Janie B Butts and Karen L Rich On:Guilty but Good: Defending Voluntary Active Euthanasia From a Virtue Perspective'. Nursing Ethics 15 (4):449-451.score: 12.0
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  13. Bjørn Stensaker & Mats Benner (2013). Doomed to Be Entrepreneurial: Institutional Transformation or Institutional Lock-Ins of 'New' Universities? Minerva 51 (4):399-416.score: 12.0
    Universities worldwide are facing enormous strains as a result of increased external expectations where global visibility should be mixed with local and regional utility. In debates on the future of higher education, becoming an entrepreneurial university has been highlighted as a novel – although perhaps a more hybrid – way to deal with this challenge. However, while the label entrepreneurial points to an image of the university as a dynamic free agent shaped in the interplay between dynamic environments and internal (...)
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  14. Lisa Odham Stokes & Michael Hoover (2003). Comments on Karen Fang's Review of City on Fire: Hong Kong Cinema. Film-Philosophy 7 (5).score: 12.0
    Karen Fang 'The Poverty of Sociological Studies of Hong Kong Cinema: Stokes and Hoover's _City on Fire_' _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 7 no. 36, October 2003.
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  15. Karen I. Vaughn (1994). Book Review:Locke on Money. John Locke, Patrick Hyde Kelly. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (2):413-.score: 10.0
  16. Trish Glazebrook (2002). Karen Warren's Ecofeminism. Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):12-26.score: 9.0
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  17. I. I. I. John (2008). Not Biting the Hand That Feeds Them: Hegemonic Expediency in the Newsroom and the Karen Ryan/Health and Human Services Department Video News Release. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (2):110 – 125.score: 9.0
    This study examines the use of a video news release in a specific story. Press coverage and editorial criticism in the case showed that journalists do not articulate sufficiently how the news owners' sway, through institutional controls, can lead to a hegemony of expedient action in the newsroom. Critical self-reflection by news workers will better enable journalists to ethically deliberate news choices that balance their responsibilities to owners, peers, and the public.
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  18. Stanislaus J. Dundon (1978). Karen Quinlan and the Freedom of the Dying. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (4):280-291.score: 9.0
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  19. Alan Strathern (2009). Karen Armstrong's Axial Age: Origins and Ethics. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):293-299.score: 9.0
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  20. Paul Bradshaw (2007). The Oxford History of Christian Worship. Edited by Geoffrey Wainwright & Karen B. Westerfield Tucker. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):630–631.score: 9.0
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  21. Eva H. Cadwallader (1978). Value Trichotomizing in Philosophy and Psychology: On Nicolai Hartmann and Karen Horney. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (2):219-226.score: 9.0
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  22. Terrie A. Becerra (2010). Karen M. O'Neill: Rivers by Design: State Power and the Origins of U.S. Flood Control. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (3):303-307.score: 9.0
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  23. William McBride (1999). Karen Vintages: Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (4):467-472.score: 9.0
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  24. Cyrus P. Olsen (2006). Karl Rahner: Theology and Philosophy by Karen Kilby. Heythrop Journal 47 (4):670–674.score: 9.0
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  25. John Russon (2007). Review of Karen S. Feldman, Binding Words: Conscience and Rhetoric in Hobbes, Hegel, and Heidegger. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).score: 9.0
  26. K. Manfred (1990). Four Thousand Ships Passed Through the Lock: Object-Induced Measure Functions on Events. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (5):487-520.score: 9.0
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  27. Petra Bartosiewicz (2010). The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days - Karen Greenberg. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (1):107-109.score: 9.0
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  28. Claudine Michel (1996). Tapping the Wisdom of the Ancestors: An Attempt to Recast Vodou and Morality Through the Voice of Mama Lola and Karen Mccarthy Brown. University of Massachusetts, William Monroe Trotter Institute.score: 9.0
     
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  29. Karen L. Pilkington (1998). Richard Vernon, The Career of Toleration: John Locke, Jonas Proast, and After Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):74-76.score: 8.0
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  30. Karen I. Vaughn (1978). John Locke and the Labor Theory of Value. Journal of Libertarian Studies 2 (4):311-326.score: 8.0
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  31. Daniel Z. Korman (2010). Locke on Substratum: A Deflationary Interpretation. Locke Studies 10:61-84.score: 7.0
    I defend an interpretation of Locke’s remarks on substratum according to which substrata not only have sensible qualities but are just familiar things and stuffs: horses, stones, gold, wax, and snow. The supporting relation that holds between substrata and the qualities that they support is simply the familiar relation of having, or instantiating, which holds between a particular substance and its qualities. I address the obvious objection to the interpretation -- namely, that it cannot be reconciled with Locke’s claim that (...)
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  32. Gabor Forrai (2010). Locke on Substance in General. Locke Studies 10 (27):27-59.score: 7.0
    Locke’s conception of substance in general or substratum has two relatively widespread interpretations. According to one, substance in general is the bearer of properties, a pure subject, something which sustains properties but itself has no properties. I will call this interpretation traditional, because it has already been formulated by Leibniz. According to the other interpretation, substance is general is something like real essence: an underlying structure which is responsible for the fact that certain observable properties form stable, recurrent clusters. I (...)
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  33. Peter Martin Jaworski (2011). The Metaphysics of Locke's Labour View. Locke Studies 11:73-106.score: 7.0
    This paper is an evaluation of John Locke's labour theory of property. Section I sets out Locke's labour view. Section II addresses several possible objections, including against the conceptual coherence of Locke's argument, against the metaphysical implications of his view, as well as foundational criticisms of the moral significance of labour and of my relations with objects that are grounded in labour under certain conditions and circumstances. I attempt to address each of these criticisms in a Lockian spirit, which will (...)
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  34. Walter Ott (1997). Locke and the Scholastics on Theological Discourse. Locke Studies 28 (1):51-66.score: 7.0
    On the face of it, Locke rejects the scholastics' main tool for making sense of talk of God, namely, analogy. Instead, Locke claims that we generate an idea of God by 'enlarging' our ideas of some attributes (such as knowledge) with the idea of infinity. Through an analysis of Locke's idea of infinity, I argue that he is in fact not so distant from the scholastics and in particular must rely on analogy of inequality.
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  35. Han Thomas Adriaenssen (2011). An Early Critic of Locke: The Anti-Scepticism of Henry Lee. Locke Studies 11:17-47.score: 7.0
    Although Henry Lee is often recognized to be an important early critic of Locke's 'way of ideas', his Anti-Scepticism (1702) has hardly received the scholarly attention it deserves. This paper seeks to fill that lacuna. It argues that Lee's criticism of Locke's alleged representationalism was original, and that it was quite different from the more familiar kind of criticism that was launched against Locke's theory of ideas by such thinkers as John Sergeant and Thomas Reid. In addition, the paper offers (...)
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  36. Helga Varden (2006). Locke's Waste Restriction and His Strong Voluntarism. Locke Studies 6:127-141.score: 7.0
    This paper argues that there is a conflict between two principles informing Locke’s political philosophy, namely his waste restriction and his strong voluntarism. Locke’s waste restriction is proposed as a necessary, enforceable restriction upon rightful private property holdings and it yields arguments to preserve and redistribute natural resources. Locke’s strong voluntarism is proposed as the liberal ideal of political obligations. It expresses Locke’s view that each individual has a natural political power, which can only be transferred to a political body (...)
     
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  37. Julie Walsh (2010). 'Things for Actions': Locke's Mistake in 'Of Power'. Locke Studies 10 (2010):85-94.score: 7.0
    In a letter to William Molyneux John Locke states that in reviewing his chapter 'Of Power' for the second edition of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding he noticed that he had made one mistake which, now corrected, has put him "into a new view of things" which will clarify his account of human freedom. Locke says the mistake was putting “things for actions” on p.123 of the first edition, a page on which the word 'things' does not appear (The Correspondence (...)
     
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  38. Shelley Weinberg (2011). Locke on Personal Identity. Philosophy Compass 6 (6):398-407.score: 6.0
    Locke’s account of personal identity has been highly influential because of its emphasis on a psychological criterion. The same consciousness is required for being the same person. It is not so clear, however, exactly what Locke meant by ‘consciousness’ or by ‘having the same consciousness’. Interpretations vary: consciousness is seen as identical to memory, as identical to a first personal appropriation of mental states, and as identical to a first personal distinctive experience of the qualitative features of one’s own thinking. (...)
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  39. Samuel C. Rickless (1997). Locke on Primary and Secondary Qualities. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):297-319.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I argue that Book II, Chapter viii of Locke' Essay is a unified, self-consistent whole, and that the appearance of inconsistency is due largely to anachronistic misreadings and misunderstandings. The key to the distinction between primary and secondary qualities is that the former are, while the latter are not, real properties, i.e., properties that exist in bodies independently of being perceived. Once the distinction is properly understood, it becomes clear that Locke's arguments for it are simple, valid (...)
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  40. Shelley Weinberg (2012). The Metaphysical Fact of Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Personal Identity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):387-415.score: 6.0
    Locke’s theory of personal identity was philosophically groundbreaking for its attempt to establish a non-substantial identity condition. Locke states, “For the same consciousness being preserv’d, whether in the same or different Substances, the personal Identity is preserv’d” (II.xxvii.13). Many have interpreted Locke to think that consciousness identifies a self both synchronically and diachronically by attributing thoughts and actions to a self. Thus, many have attributed to Locke either a memory theory or an appropriation theory of personal identity. But the former (...)
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  41. Walter Ott (2012). What is Locke's Theory of Representation? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1077-1095.score: 6.0
    On a currently popular reading of Locke, an idea represents its cause, or what God intended to be its cause. Against Martha Bolton and my former self (among others), I argue that Locke cannot hold such a view, since it sins against his epistemology and theory of abstraction. I argue that Locke is committed to a resemblance theory of representation, with the result that ideas of secondary qualities are not representations.
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  42. Stewart Duncan, Toland and Locke in the Leibniz-Burnett Correspondence.score: 6.0
    Leibniz's correspondence with Thomas Burnett of Kemnay is probably best known for Leibniz's attempts to communicate with Locke via Burnett. But Burnett was also, more generally a source of English intellectual news for Leibniz. As such, Burnett provided an important part of the context in which Locke was presented to and understood by Leibniz. -/- This paper examines the Leibniz-Burnett correspondence, and argues against Jolley's suggestion that "the context in which Leibniz learned about Locke was primarily a theological one". That (...)
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  43. Simona Aimar (2011). Counterfactuals, Overdetermination and Mental Causation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3):469-477.score: 6.0
    The Exclusion Problem (EP) for mental causation suggests that there is a tension between the claim that the mental causes physical effects, and the claim that the mental does not overdetermine its physical effects. In response, Karen Bennett (2008, 2003) puts forward an extra necessary condition for overdetermination: if one candidate cause were to occur but the other were not to occur, the effect would still occur. She thus denies one of the assumptions of EP, the assumption that if (...)
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  44. Jan-Erik Jones (2010). Locke on Real Essences, Intelligibility and Natural Kinds. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:147-172.score: 6.0
    In this paper I criticize arguments by Pauline Phemister and Matthew Stuart that John Locke's position in his An Essay Concerning Human Understanding allows for natural kinds based on similarities among real essences. On my reading of Locke, not only are similarities among real essences irrelevant to species, but natural kind theories based on them are unintelligible.
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  45. Alan Salter & Charles T. Wolfe (2009). “Empiricism Contra Experiment: Harvey, Locke and the Revisionist View of Experimental Philosophy”. Bulletin d'histoire et d'épistémologie des sciences de la vie 16 (2):113-140.score: 6.0
    In this paper we suggest a revisionist perspective on two significant figures in early modern life science and philosophy: William Harvey and John Locke. Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, is often named as one of the rare representatives of the ‘life sciences’ who was a major figure in the Scientific Revolution. While this status itself is problematic, we would like to call attention to a different kind of problem: Harvey dislikes abstraction and controlled experiments (aside from (...)
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  46. Shelley Weinberg (2008). The Coherence of Consciousness in Locke's Essay. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (1):21-40.score: 6.0
    Locke has been accused of failing to have a coherent understanding of consciousness, since it can be identical neither to reflection nor to ordinary perception without contradicting other important commitments. I argue that the account of consciousness is coherent once we see that, for Locke, perceptions of ideas are complex mental acts and that consciousness can be seen as a special kind of self-referential mental state internal to any perception of an idea.
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  47. Basil Smith (2006). John Locke, Personal Identity and Memento. In Mark T. Conard (ed.), The Philosophy of Neo-Noir. University of Kentucky Press.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I compare John Locke’s “memory theory” of personal identity and Memento (directed by Christopher Nolan). I argue that the plot of Memento is ambiguous, in that the main character (Leonard Shelby, played by Guy Pearce) seems to have two histories. As such, Memento is but a series of puzzle cases that intend to illustrate that, although our memories may not be chronologically related to one another, and may even be fused with the memories of other persons, those (...)
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  48. Rafael De Clercq (2005). A Criterion of Diachronic Identity Based on Locke's Principle. Metaphysica 6 (1):23-38.score: 6.0
    The aim of this paper is to derive a perfectly general criterion of identity through time from Locke’s Principle, which says that two things of the same kind cannot occupy the same space at the same time. In this way, the paper pursues a suggestion made by Peter F. Strawson almost thirty years ago in an article called ‘Entity and Identity’. The reason why the potential of this suggestion has so far remained unrealized is twofold: firstly, the suggestion was never (...)
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  49. Charles T. Wolfe (2010). Locke’s Compatibilism: Suspension of Desire or Suspension of Determinism? In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O.’Rourke & Harry Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics and Responsibility. MIT Press.score: 6.0
    In Book II, chapter xxi of the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, on ‘Power’, Locke presents a radical critique of free will. This is the longest chapter in the Essay, and it is a difficult one, not least since Locke revised it four times without always taking care to ensure that every part cohered with the rest. My interest is to work out a coherent statement of what would today be termed ‘compatibilism’ from this text – namely, a doctrine which seeks (...)
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