1. Karen Petroski, Legal Fictions in Theory and Practice.
    Since Lon Fuller published his 1930 trilogy of essays on the topic, students of the legal fiction have focused on identifying additional examples of fictions or challenging Fuller’s classic taxonomy. But Fuller did more in these essays than propose a definition and a classification system; he also argued that legal fictions are examples of a more general phenomenon found in many systems of specialized language usage. Drawing on work done in the intervening decades on related issues outside the law, this (...)
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  2. Karen Petroski (2015). Legal Fictions and the Limits of Legal Language. In Legal Fictions in Theory and Practice. Springer International Publishing.
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  3. Karen Petroski (2008). The Public Face of Presumptions. Episteme 5 (3):pp. 388-401.
    We commonly think of presumptions as second-best inferential tools allowing us to reach conclusions, if we must, under conditions of limited information. Scholarship on the topic across the disciplines has espoused a common conception of presumptions that defines them according to their function within the decisionmaking process. This focus on the “private” face of presumptions has generated a predominantly critical and grudging view of them, perpetuated certain conceptual ambiguities, and, most important, neglected the fact that what we refer to as (...)
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