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Karen Ritchie [7]Karen S. Ritchie [1]
  1. Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Ethical Considerations for Nosological Flexibility in Human Kinds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):31-43.
  2. Janice E. Graham & Karen Ritchie (2006). Reifying Relevance in Mild Cognitive Impairment: An Appeal for Care and Caution. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):57-60.
  3. M. Gustafson, Stanley Hauerwas, George BChusfh, Andrew Lustig, James J. McCartney, Karen Ritchie, David C. Thomasma & Becky Cox White (1991). The Editors Express Their Appreciation to the Following Individuals Who, Though Not Members of the Advisory Board, Generously Reviewed Articles for the Journal During 1990: George J. Annas, Nora K. Bell, Robert C. Cefalo, John H. Cover-Dale, Larry Churchill, Rebecca Dresser, Gary B. Ferngren, James. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (369).
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  4. Karen Ritchie (1991). Response to Dr. Sakai. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2):159-160.
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  5. Karen S. Ritchie (1990). The Last Remaining Way to Die. Hastings Center Report 20 (3):2-3.
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  6. Karen Ritchie (1989). The Little Woman Meets Son of Dsm-III. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (6):695-708.
    The author discusses conceptual problems in psychiatry, illustrated by a debate over inclusion of a new disorder, masochistic personality disorder, in DSM-III-R, the manual of psychiatric diagnoses. While the DSM committee has attempted to avoid assumptions about theory and values in an attempt to be scientific, this has proved impossible, as theory is an integral part of scientific observation and values are a prerequisite for any judgment. The foundation for psychiatry cannot be theory – it can only be patient need. (...)
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  7. Karen Ritchie (1988). Professionalism, Altruism, and Overwork. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):447-455.
    The author contends that overworking residents cannot be ethically justified. There is evidence that overwork is detrimental both to the resident and to the patient. In addition, thu argument that working long hours is essential to maintain medicine's status as a profession is analyzed. The claim cannot be supported by definitions of professionalism. Although Flexner's definition does specify altruism as an essential component, it does not justify long working hours for residents. Altruism is obligatory in some limited cases, but only (...)
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  8. Karen Ritchie (1988). When It's Not Really Optional. Hastings Center Report 18 (4):25-26.
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