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Profile: Karin Verelst
  1. Karin Verelst (2014). Newton Vs. Leibniz: Intransparency Vs. Inconsistency. Synthese:2907-2940.
    We investigate the structure common to causal theories that attempt to explain a (part of) the world. Causality implies conservation of identity, itself a far from simple notion. It imposes strong demands on the universalizing power of the theories concerned. These demands are often met by the introduction of a metalevel which encompasses the notions of 'system' and 'lawful behaviour'. In classical mechanics, the division between universal and particular leaves its traces in the separate treatment of cinematics and dynamics. This (...)
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  2. Karin Verelst (2014). Newton Versus Leibniz: Intransparency Versus Inconsistency. Synthese 191 (13):2907-2940.
    In this paper I argue that inconsistencies in scientific theories may arise from the type of causality relation they—tacitly or explicitly—embody. All these seemingly different causality relations can be subsumed under a general strategy developed to defeat the paradoxes which inevitably occur in our experience of the real. With respect to this, scientific theories are just a subclass of the larger class of metaphysical theories, construed as theories that attempt to explain a (part of) the world consistently. All metaphysical theories (...)
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  3. Maarten van Dyck & Karin Verelst (2013). “Whatever Is Neither Everywhere Nor Anywhere Does Not Exist”: The Concepts of Space and Time in Newton and Leibniz. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (3):399-402.
  4. Karin Verelst (2008). On What Ontology is and Not-Is. Foundations of Science 13 (3):347-370.
    In this paper I investigate the relation between physics and metaphysics in Plato’s participation theory. I show that the logic shoring up Plato’s metaphysics in paraconsistent, as had been suggested already by Graham Priest. The transformation of the paradoxical One-and-Many of the pre-Socratics into a paraconsistent Great-and-Small bridges the abyss between archaic rationality and the world of classical logic based ultimately on the principle of contradiction. Indeed, language is an organ of perception, not simply a means of communication. J. Jaynes, (...)
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  5. Karin Verelst (2006). Zeno's Paradoxes. A Cardinal Problem. 1. On Zenonian Plurality. In J. Šķilters (ed.), Paradox: Logical, Cognitive and Communicative Aspects. Proceedings of the First International Symposium of Cognition, Logic and Communication,. University of Latvia Press.
    In this paper the claim that Zeno's paradoxes have been solved is contested. Although "no one has ever touched Zeno without refuting him" (Whitehead), it will be our aim to show that, whatever it was that was refuted, it was certainly not Zeno. The paper is organised in two parts. In the first part we will demonstrate that upon direct analysis of the Greek sources, an underlying structure common to both the Paradoxes of Plurality and the Paradoxes of Motion can (...)
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  6. Karin Verelst (2002). On the Ontology Realised in Technological World-Reconstruction. Dialogue and Universalism 11 (3):55-68.
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  7. Karin Verelst (2002). Towards an Ontology of Experience-Methodological Reflections1. Ludus Vitalis 10 (17):149-162.
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  8. Rudolf De Smet & Karin Verelst (2001). Newton's Scholium Generale: The Platonic and Stoic Legacy — Philo, Justus Lipsius and the Cambridge Platonists. History of Science 39 (123):30.
  9. Karin Verelst & Bob Coecke (1999). Early Greek Thought and Perspectives for the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: Preliminaries to an Ontological Approach. In S. Smets J. P. Van Bendegem G. C. Cornelis (ed.), Metadebates on Science. VUB-Press and Kluwer.
    It will be shown in this article that an ontological approach for some problems related to the interpretation of Quantum Mechanics could emerge from a re-evaluation of the main paradox of early Greek thought: the paradox of Being and non-Being, and the solutions presented to it by Plato and Aristotle. More well known are the derivative paradoxes of Zeno: the paradox of motion and the paradox of the One and the Many. They stem from what was perceived by classical philosophy (...)
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