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  1. Karl Widerquist, JosÉ Noguera, A., Yannick Vanderborght & Jurgen De Wispelaere (eds.) (2013). Basic Income: An Anthology of Contemporary Research. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  2. Karl Widerquist (2010). How the Sufficiency Minimum Becomes a Social Maximum. Utilitas 22 (4):474-480.
    This article argues that, under likely empirical conditions, sufficientarianism leads not to an easily achievable duty to maintain a social minimum but to the onerous duty of maintaining a social maximum at the sufficiency level. This happens because sufficientarians ask us to give no weight at all to small benefits for people above the sufficiency level if the alternative is to relieve the suffering of people below it. If we apply this judgment in a world where there are rare diseases (...)
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  3. Karl Widerquist (2010). Lockean Theories of Property: Justifications for Unilateral Appropriation. Public Reason 2 (1):3-26.
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  4. Karl Widerquist (2010). The Physical Basis of Voluntary Trade. Human Rights Review 11 (1):83-103.
    The article discusses the conditions under which can we say that people enter the economic system voluntarily. “The Need for an Exit Option” briefly explains the philosophical argument that voluntary interaction requires an exit option—a reasonable alternative to participation in the projects of others. “The Treatment of Effective Forced Labor in Economic and Political Theory” considers the treatment of effectively forced interaction in economic and political theory. “Human Need” discusses theories of human need to determine the capabilities a person requires (...)
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  5. Karl Widerquist (2009). A Dilemma for Libertarianism. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (1):43-72.
    Many libertarians make a moral argument that liberty requires the freedom to exercise strong property rights. From this, they argue that no more than a minimal state with sharply limited powers of taxation can be justified. A larger state would supposedly interfere with private property rights and thereby reduce liberty. In response, this article shows how natural rights to property do not entail any particular vision of the state. It demonstrates that the principles of natural property rights support monarchy just (...)
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  6. Karl Widerquist (2009). Ken Binmore, Natural Justice (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), Pp. XII + 207. Utilitas 21 (4):529-532.
  7. Karl Widerquist (2009). Why Do Philosophers Talk so Much and Read so Little About the Stone Age? Politics, Philosophy, and Economics 8 (1):43-72.
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