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Profile: Karyn L. Lai (University of New South Wales)
  1.  51
    Karyn L. Lai (2006). Li in the "Analects": Training in Moral Comptence and the Question of Flexibility. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):69 - 83.
    It is proposed here that the Confucian li, norms of appropriate behavior, be understood as part of the dynamic process of moral self-cultivation. Within this framework li are multidimensional, as they have different functions at different stages in the cultivation process. This novel interpretation refocuses the issue regarding the flexibility of li, a topic that is still being debated by scholars. The significance of this proposal is not restricted to a new understanding of li. Key features of the various stages (...)
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  2. Karyn L. Lai (1995). Confucian Moral Thinking. Philosophy East and West 45 (2):249-272.
  3.  37
    Karyn L. Lai (2003). Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical holism (...)
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  4.  20
    Karyn L. Lai (2009). Judgment in Confucian Ethics. Sophia 48 (1):77-84.
  5.  10
    Karyn L. Lai (2003). Confucian Moral Cultivation : Some Parallels with Musical Training. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court
  6.  44
    Karyn L. Lai (2007). Ziran and Wuwei in the Daodejing : An Ethical Assessment. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):325-337.
    In Daoist philosophy, the self is understood as an individual interdependent with others, and situated within a broader environment. Within this framework, the concept ziran is frequently understood in terms of naturalness or nature while wuwei is explained in terms of non-oppressive government. In many existing accounts, little is done to connect these two key Daoist concepts. Here, I suggest that wuwei and ziran are correlated, ethical, concepts. Together, they provide a unifying ethical framework for understanding the philosophy of the (...)
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  7.  3
    Karyn L. Lai (2006). Philosophy and Philosophical Reasoning in the Zhuangzi: Dealing with Plurality. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):365-374.
  8.  25
    Karyn L. Lai (2000). The Daodejing: Resources for Contemporary Feminist Thinking. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):131–153.
  9.  20
    Karyn L. Lai (2009). Chong, Kim-Chong, Early Confucian Ethics: Concepts and Arguments. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):467-470.
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  10.  20
    Karyn L. Lai (2000). Introduction: Feminism and Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):127–130.
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  11.  3
    Karyn L. Lai & Wai Wai Chiu (2013). Ming in the Zhuangzi Neipian: Enlightened Engagement. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):527-543.
    In this article, we present an account of ming 明 in the Zhuangzi's Neipian in light of the disagreements among the thinkers of the time. We suggest that ming is associated with the Daoist sage's vision: he sees through the debaters' attempts to win the debates. We propose that ming is primarily a meta-epistemological stance, that is, the sage understands the nature of the debates and does not enter the fray; therefore he does not share the thinkers' anxieties. The sage (...)
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  12.  15
    Karyn L. Lai (2007). A Review of Antonio S. Cua's Human Nature, Ritual, and History: Studies in Xunzi and Chinese Philosophy , in Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy, Vol. 43, Washington, D.C., Catholic University of America Press, 2005, 406 Pp., ISBN: 0813213851, Hb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (2):203-205.
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  13.  9
    Karyn L. Lai (2007). Introduction: New Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (s1):3-8.
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  14.  5
    Karyn L. Lai (2012). Knowing to Act in the Moment: Examples From Confucius'Analects. Asian Philosophy 22 (4):347-364.
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  15.  2
    Karyn L. Lai (1999). Clara Wing-Chung Ho, Ed., Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women: The Qing Period, 1644–1911. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):251-256.
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  16.  7
    Karyn L. Lai (2008). Learning From the Confucians: Learning From the Past. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):97-119.
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  17.  1
    Karyn L. Lai (2007). Understanding Change: The Interdependent Self in its Environment. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (s1):81-99.
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  18.  5
    Karyn L. Lai (2003). Critical Notice of Joel J. Kupperman, Learning From Asian Philosophy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):126 – 133.
  19. Chung-Ying Cheng, Roger T. Ames, Vincent Shen, Kim-Chong Chong, Paul R. Goldin, Karyn L. Lai & Tan Mingran (2008). Philosophy of Xunzi and Antonio S. Cua. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1).
     
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  20.  0
    Karyn L. Lai (2007). A Review of Antonio S. Cua's, in Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy, Vol. 43, Washington, DC, Catholic University of America Press, 2005, 406 Pp., ISBN: 0813213851, Hb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (2):203-205.
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