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Profile: Kate Abramson
  1. Kate Abramson (2014). Turning Up the Lights on Gaslighting. Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):1-30.
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  2. Kate Abramson (2013). Affective Conflict and Virtue: Hume's Answer to Aristotle. In Jon Miller (ed.), The Reception of Aristotle's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  3. Kate Abramson & Adam Leite (2011). Love as a Reactive Emotion. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):673-699.
    One variety of love is familiar in everyday life and qualifies in every reasonable sense as a reactive attitude. ‘Reactive love’ is paradigmatically (a) an affectionate attachment to another person, (b) appropriately felt as a non-self-interested response to particular kinds of morally laudable features of character expressed by the loved one in interaction with the lover, and (c) paradigmatically manifested in certain kinds of acts of goodwill and characteristic affective, desiderative and other motivational responses (including other-regarding concern and a desire (...)
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  4. Kate Abramson, Donald Ainslie, Lilli Alanen, Annette Baier, Tom Beauchamp, Helen Beebee, Martin Bell, Christopher Berry, Lorraine Besser-Jones & John Biro (2010). Hume Studies Referees, 2009–2010. Hume Studies 36 (2):261-263.
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  5. Kate Abramson (2007). Hume's Distinction Between Philosophical Anatomy and Painting. Philosophy Compass 2 (5):680–698.
    Although the implications of Humes distinction between philosophical anatomy and painting have been the subject of lively scholarly debates, it is a puzzling fact that the details of the distinction itself have largely been a matter of interpretive presumption rather than debate. This would be unproblematic if Humes views about these two species of philosophy were obvious, or if there were a rich standard interpretation of the distinction that we had little reason to doubt. But a careful review of the (...)
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  6. Kate Abramson (2006). Happy to Unite, or Not? Philosophy Compass 1 (3):290-302.
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  7. Kate Abramson, Donald Ainslie, Lilli Alanen, Julia Annas, Margaret Atherton, Carla Bagnoli, Donald Baxter, Martin Bell, Richard Bett & Colin Bird (2006). Hume Studies Referees, 2005-2006. Hume Studies 32 (2):391-393.
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  8. Kate Abramson, Larry Arnhart, Carla Bagnoli, Martin Bell, Theodore Benditt, Christopher Berry, Deborah Boyle, John Bricke, Justin Broackes & Janet Broughton (2004). Hume Studies Referees, 2003–2004. Hume Studies 30 (2):443-445.
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  9. Kate Abramson, Donald Ainslie, Donald L. M. Baxter, Tom L. Beauchamp, Martin Bell, Richard Bett, John Bricke, Philip Bricker, Justin Broackes & Stephen Buckle (2003). Hume Studies Referees, 2002–2003. Hume Studies 29 (2).
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  10. Kate Abramson (2002). Two Portraits of the Humean Moral Agent. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):301–334.
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  11. Kate Abramson (2001). Sympathy and the Project of Hume's Second Enquiry. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 83 (1):45-80.
    More than two hundred years after its publication, David Hume's Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals is still widely regarded as either a footnote to the more philosophically interesting third book of the Treatise, or an abbreviated, more stylish, version of that earlier work. These standard interpretations are rather difficult to square with Hume's own assessment of the second Enquiry. Are we to think that Hume called the EPM “incomparably the best” of all his writings only because he preferred that (...)
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  12. Donald Ainslie, Kate Abramson, Karl Ameriks, Elizabeth Ashford, Martin Bell, Simon Blackburn, Martha Bolton, M. A. Box, Vere Chappell & Rachel Cohan (2001). Hume Studies Referees, 2000-2001. Hume Studies 27 (2).
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  13. Kate Abramson (1999). Correcting Our Sentiments About Hume's Moral Point of View. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):333-361.
  14. Kate Abramson (1999). Hume on Cultural Conflicts of Values. Philosophical Studies 94 (1-2):173-187.
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